Baby Club: Relax Baby with Massage

A friend of mine had her first baby about two weeks ago, and her response to my first post-partum text was, “No one EVER told me it was going to be like this.”

Her baby, like every baby, cries. A lot. She doesn’t always know why. Even when she’s fed, dry and comfortable, sometimes she cries.

That’s just the way it goes.

Unless your baby has an underlying medical condition, it’s going to cry for reasons we can’t always figure out.

There are some nice ways to soothe baby, though, and I suggested infant massage.

Johnson’s Bedtime Baby Lotion is a lavender-infused, hydrating lotion which is good for baby’s skin and promotes calm.  Lavender has long been used to help induce sleep and relaxation, and now it’s blended with the baby-friendly properties of Johnson’s lotions.

If you’re going to try baby massage, be sure to be very gentle. Start near baby’s torso and work your way out. You can start with baby on her tummy and gently massage her back, moving to her legs and arms, neck, shoulders and head. Then flip her over and massage her front, using light, circular movements of your thumbs, to do her tummy, arms and legs. You probably want to warm the lotion in your hands rather than squirting it directly on her skin.

After you’re finished, swaddle your baby in a soft blanket and hold her close to you until she’s drowsy, then place her in her bed and wish her sweet dreams!

TIP: Johnson’s also makes a Lavender Bath Wash. Start with that, and bathe your baby in warm water, before doing baby massage for the ultimate baby relaxation experience.

Published 02/28/19
 


Kids and Colds

Cold and flu season is in full swing, and it’s hard to escape without a sniffle, especially if your little one is exposed to other kids at day care, school or church.

Really, they can pick up a cold anywhere, even riding in the cart with you at the grocery store!

There are plenty of ways to mitigate cold and flu season without hibernating all winter long.

If your baby is 6 months or older, he’s eligible to get the flu vaccine. You can a get a shot at Brookshire’s pharmacy, or take him to his pediatrician for the flu mist (call ahead, not all providers offer flu mist). This not only reduces his chances of contracting the flu, but also lessens the risk of severe ramifications if he does contract the illness.

Wash hands. Wash hands a lot, using warm water and soap. Scrub for a minute.

This one is obvious, but avoid contact with people who are clearly sick themselves. In the meantime, as parents, keep yourselves healthy, so you can take care of your kids the best you can.

If your little one DOES get sick, alternating doses of acetaminophen and ibuprofen can help bring down a fever (check with your pediatrician or a Brookshire’s pharmacist for exact dosage), while warm baths can help loosen congestion. Sometimes a humidifier or sitting in a steamy bathroom can also help alleviate a cough or labored breathing. If congestion becomes too severe, seek medical attention.

Bulb syringes or other suction apparatus and saline drops can help clear stuffy noses. Stock up on soft tissues to help wipe your little one’s sensitive nose.

If your child has symptoms of a cold or cough or runs fever for more than 48 hours that you can’t break, bring him in to see his pediatrician.

Published 11/29/18