share. The Brookshire's Blog

Terrible Twos


Last weekend, I watched my friend’s toddler have a meltdown at a birthday party.

No. No. No. He did NOT want to play the game. He did NOT want the green cupcake; he wanted the BLUE cupcake. He did NOT want to sing the appropriate song to the birthday boy.

It was terribly frustrating, and I’d dare say embarrassing for his parents, yet, at the same time, entirely developmentally appropriate. They certainly weren’t the only ones in that same position. (Sophie had to be taken to the car when there weren’t any PINK cupcakes.)

About the time your little wonder wall hits age 2, they begin to develop defiance, and that’s okay. He’s learning to test his limits, and he’s learning what he likes and does not like. He’s also learning how it’s appropriate to vocalize those likes and dislikes, and it’s up to you to teach him how to set those boundaries.

When your toddler screams with rage when it’s time to leave the playground because he doesn’t want to, it’s not your place to give in. It’s time to leave the playground. You might want to manage his expectations by giving him a countdown. “Joshua, we’re going to leave in 2 minutes.” (Toddlers don’t have a great concept of time, but a countdown can help prepare them). “Joshua, we’re going to leave in 1 minute.” Then, you leave. Don’t backtrack on what you say you’re going to do; be consistent.

If there’s not a pink cupcake, give Sophie options. “You can have the green cupcake, or you don’t get a cupcake. What do you choose?” Chances are, Sophie will pick the green cupcake. Remind Sophie that it’s Bryce’s special day, not hers. When it’s HER special day, SHE can pick the pink cupcake.

Also, keep in mind that your toddler needs to go into situations well-rested and well-fed. Keep him on his schedule. If you’re going to a birthday party, make sure he’s had his nap first and eaten his lunch. If you’re going to an unfamiliar house, pack his favorite foods just in case he needs a backup. (See Gerber’s Lil Entrees, below.)

TIP: Gerber’s Lil Entrees are great meals for your toddler to not only feed himself but also get great nutrition. Gerber’s recipes, with entrees like Chicken and Brown Rice with Peas and Corn, are designed specifically for toddlers, with a taste your little one will love, an easy-to-eat texture and the perfect size for easy self-feeding. If your little one doesn’t like his food touching, like my older son didn’t, Gerber made these entrees with two compartments that keep food separate.



The pincer grasp


The pincer grasp is a big deal for your baby to develop during the latter half of their first year.

The pincer grasp, or using their thumb and pointer finger to pick up objects, is a handy movement used for feeding and grabbing objects when playing.

To encourage use of the pincer grasp, give baby small bites of food, like Cheerios if your baby is ready for that kind of food or soft bits of fruits or veggies otherwise, and let him pick them up off of his high chair tray or plate and eat them. Food is always a good incentive!

Board books with peekaboo flaps are also good for using the pincer grasp as baby has to open the flaps to see what’s inside. Activity boards with slider windows, buttons or other knobs also help develop this skill.

TIP: Organics Happy Baby Clearly Crafted Stage 2 pouches are perfect foods for your little one to enjoy. Thick and smooth, these are specially formulated for the child aged 6 months and up exploring the world of solid foods. These foods are all certified USDA organic, non-GMO project verified, gluten-free and kosher without artificial flavors. They do have delicious flavors like Bananas, Sweet Potato and Papaya; Pears, Squash and Blackberries; Apples, Kale and Avocados; Apples, Guava and Beets; Pears, Pumpkin and Passion Fruit; and Pears, Zucchini and Peas.



Cradle cap


One of the most common ailments for newborns is cradle cap. It kind of looks like dandruff for your baby, which might strike you as kind of weird to see your precious, perfect newborn with a scaly scalp. Don’t worry; it’s totally normal.

Cradle cap looks like scaly or yellow crusty patches on your baby’s head. It doesn’t imply illness or that your baby is dirty. It just happens.

It’s not harmful, and it will resolve itself, usually by six months but almost always by baby’s first birthday.

To help healing along, all you need to do is treat cradle cap at home, with products you can find at Brookshire’s.

About an hour before baby’s bath, rub his scalp with Top Care Baby Oil, mineral oil or petroleum jelly to help loosen the scales or crusty parts.

Then, when you’re ready to shampoo with Top Care Baby Shampoo, get his scalp wet, and then gently scrub the scalp with a soft bristle brush (a soft toothbrush actually works really well!) for a few minutes to remove the scales. Wash with baby shampoo. Rinse well, and towel dry.

TIP: OXO On-The-Go Wipes Dispensers are a must-have for your diaper bag, your car, your stroller, your travel tote, your beach bag, your briefcase or anywhere else baby might be. These sleek, streamlined, waterproof and leak-proof cases are perfect for carrying extra baby wipes for when you need them most. They fit into your purse or portable pack, and they are essential for carrying wipes for cleaning emergencies. The best part? You really don’t even need a baby to need baby wipes.



Family Matters: Caramel Popcorn


When I was growing up, my mom would make popcorn every night after we went to bed. I suppose it was her treat after surviving the day with five kids.

When I was old enough to be aware of the popping sound coming from the stove downstairs, the sound of the Revere™ Ware pan shaking across the electric elements and, of course, the delicious aroma wafting up the staircase, I vowed that as soon as I was old enough, I’d make popcorn every night, too.

It turns out that I don’t, but that’s okay because my mom will still make it for me every time I go home. I’m pretty sure she even still uses the same pan.

When I was a teenager, I’d stay up with her, and she’d make us each a bowl. We’d talk every evening over our bowl of popcorn. I think some evenings, it was the only time I’d emerge from my room after a busy day of school, field hockey practice and homework. I think some days, it probably served as my main meal of the day, if whatever she left me on a plate under a piece of waxed paper got carefully packaged back up and put in the refrigerator for leftovers if I got home way too tired to heat it up.

It’s funny how I was never too tired for popcorn, though, and for stories about how mean the coach was at practice that day, or how Tina J. had said something rude about Kimberly D’s double-layered socks in the hallway at school, or how frustrating it was to have a bottom locker, or how difficult it was to make it all the way to the math hallway in only 3 minutes after fourth period English class. Mom listened, and munched.

In the fall, she’d make double batches of popcorn at night. The next day, we’d use the cool bowls to make caramel corn. Then, we’d have huge batches of sweet stuff that she’d store in a big, white Tupperware® container that also doubled as a cake plate if you flipped it over and used the lid as the base of the cake plate. This was my brother, Jim’s, favorite way to eat popcorn and what he most often requested for his birthday treat to bring to school for his class, which happened to fall the day after Halloween. We’d package up baggies full of caramel popcorn to send in instead of cupcakes. If my memory serves me correctly, we also packaged up bags of caramel popcorn to send home with guests after his wedding 15 years ago, too.

Caramel Popcorn

Ingredients:
10 cups popped popcorn
salt
1 cup salted butter
1 cup brown sugar, packed
2 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp baking soda

Directions:
Pop popcorn on stove according to package directions. If using microwave popcorn (use plain, not buttered), pop in package. Salt and let cool.

Melt 1 cup of butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the brown sugar, and stir until thoroughly combined. Stirring continuously, bring the butter and sugar mixture to a boil.

Boil for 4 minutes without stirring. Add the vanilla; stir to mix. Boil for 1 more minute, and add the baking soda.

Remove from heat. Spread the popcorn on a baking sheet covered with waxed paper, parchment paper or aluminum foil. Drizzle the caramel over the popcorn. Stir, coating all the kernels. Let cool.

Chef Tip: Store this in an airtight container, or it will get sticky and messy.

If you’d like to make this into popcorn balls, form them into a ball shape right after pouring the caramel over the popcorn. You might want to wear food-grade gloves to protect your hands.

Add Ins: Mix in nuts, marshmallows, chocolate candies or other treats to make a fun, festive snack mix.

Serves 10

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 251, Fat: 19 g (12 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 49 mg, Sodium: 664 mg, Carbohydrates: 21 g, Fiber: 1 g, Sugar: 14 g, Protein: 1 g.



Family Matters: Castor & Pollux® Dog Cookies


In the lore of Greek mythology, Castor and Pollux were twin brothers with different fathers. They became the constellation Gemini and associated with horsemanship.

Today, we’re talking about the amazing products of Castor & Pollux® that you can feed your pup from Brookshire’s pet aisle.

Personally, I went for the Castor & Pollux® Organix™ Dog Cookies, Cheddar Cheese Flavor, to be exact.

Astro loves them.

Tell him that he has a “T.R.E.A.T” (shhhhh…don’t say it out loud….), and he’ll run to the corner of the carpet and sit patiently to wait for it….

If Astro wasn’t already pretty well-trained, these cookies would be ideal for training and rewarding good behavior, or my sweet pup has THAT look about him. These all-natural treats feature 95-percent organic ingredients, including organic free-range chicken as the No. 1 ingredient in all varieties. They’re easy to break, yet nice and crunchy. Each 1 1/2-inch long cookie contains only 8 calories and delivers a robust taste that dogs like Astro crave. They are also USDA certified-organic and all-natural with no corn, wheat or soy, and they are available in a 12-ounce size. Most of all, they’re made with love.



Family Matters: Purely Fancy Feast®


My cat, Carl, wakes up every morning begging for a good meal.

Let’s just be straight: Carl begs for a good meal pretty much every time he sees me, whether it be when  I wake up in the morning, when I come in the door in the evening, if I happen to stop by during the lunch hour, or really any time my eyes are open.

Carl gets his good meals in the form of a high-quality dry cat food.

Once a week, he also gets Purely Fancy Feast® from Purina®, on the pet food aisle at Brookshire’s. Purely Fancy Feast® entrées are made with pure seafood, chicken or beef, and no by-products or fillers for a wholesome, complete and balanced meal for mature felines.

He loves his Thursday treats, and I know he’s getting good nutrition to boot!



Family Matters: Utensils


During these years, your toddler will stop picking up his food with his fingers and learn to use utensils.

You’re going to want to encourage this new-found skill by providing him with easy-to-use, toddler-friendly starter forks and spoons.

Whether you choose plastic or a coated metal, find kid-friendly products in the baby aisle at Brookshire’s.

Toddler utensils are shorter, making it easier for your little one to navigate his food into his mouth.

They’re plastic or coated metal, so in case he misses, he can’t hurt himself (or you.)

Often, they’re curved to help him negotiate the space between his arm and the angle to get the food into his mouth.

Having contoured handles or grips also helps your toddler hold on to his fork and spoon more easily.

Generally speaking, your toddler might start out “dipping” his utensil into his food before he starts scooping or spearing his food, but that’s developmentally appropriate. He’ll work up to the finer points of eating with utensils. Just keep providing them for him, modeling the correct way to use them, and he’ll be a pro before you know it.



Family Matters: Teethers


Around this time, your baby is probably getting teeth.

For some little ones, this is a painless process. For others, they will spend the next several months drooling, fussing and chewing on everything in sight.

This is where the selection of teethers at Brookshire’s comes in handy. Pick up a variety to see which ones your baby prefers to gnaw on to relieve some of their discomfort.

Teethers are made from materials such as silicone for softer versions and plastic for harder varieties. They can come in different textures, too, with ridges, bumps or swirls that baby might like against his tender gums. Some types can be chilled to add some gentle relief to swollen or sore gums. Other varieties vibrate gently when baby applies pressure, which also feels good as baby is cutting teeth.

When choosing a teether, make sure it is phthalate-free and BPA-free, as well as made of only non-toxic materials. Only buy teethers new in packaging, and sterilize before use.



Family Matters: Bottles with Disposable Liners


One of the very best inventions for your infant, in my opinion, are bottles with disposable liners.

Sold in bulk packages, these pre-sterilized liners drop into plastic baby bottles to hold formula or expressed breast milk. They are disposable, making cleanup instantaneous.

As your baby eats, the liner gently collapses, just like mom’s breast would. This air-free feeding helps to reduce gas in your baby, which in turn helps reduce colic. Because baby takes in less air as he feeds, he has less gas, colic and discomfort.

The collapsible liners also mimic natural breast-feeding more closely by simulating the same suck, swallow and breathe patterns as breast-feeding, so your baby breathes more naturally during feeding.

Again, because these are pre-sterilized and disposable, you can rest assured that they are safe and clean. You spend less time washing, assembling and preparing your infant’s meals.

Liners are BPA-free and fit most standard-sized bottles.



Family Matters: Making School Lunches with Your Kids


Dinner is finished.

The kitchen is cleaned up.

Homework is completed.

Now comes the time of the evening we like to prepare school lunches for the next day.

I used to do it in the morning when the kids were small. Now that my boys can help, we prefer to have it done the night before and save the extra minutes in the morning. It also helps that my older son has to be at school when it’s still dark for cross country practice, so getting lunch packed the night before gives us both peace of mind that he’ll be ready to roll out the door in the morning with a nutritious lunch.

Your kids can help you pack their own lunches from an early age. It’s a nice time to talk and be together, and when they help, it guarantees they’re getting things in their lunches they’re eating, not trading.

If you haven’t gotten a lunch kit yet or are using brown paper bags, Brookshire’s has some great ones still on the shelves, like the cute Fit & Fresh thermal lunch kits with adorable designs, the super practical and stylish Bento Lunch Kit with insulated bag and removable ice packs (I’ll just go ahead and confess: I got one of those for myself to bring to work), the Fit Fresh bag in sweet patterns like Riley Ladybug, or the durable Lifoam Lunch Plus Soft-Sided Lunch Kit that comes in styles and colors great for boys.

I try to make sure we’re packing a large bottle of water, a sandwich or good protein, a fruit, a veggie and some kind of snack. Because let’s face it, lunch is more fun with a snack. I’m an “everything in moderation” kind of mom. My sister-in-law doesn’t send any “junk food” to school with her kids, and I admire that tremendously. If you do, no judgment here.

My boys like things like ham sandwiches on King’s Hawaiian® rolls, turkey and cheese roll-ups on whole wheat tortillas, Flatout® wraps stuffed with baby spinach and Roma tomatoes, or good old peanut butter and jelly on Sara Lee® Delightful™ slices of whole-wheat bread.

They love almost any fruit, so that’s easy. They favor bananas, peaches, apples or anything that’s “easy” to eat at school. Veggies are easy, too: baby carrots or celery with hummus, cucumber slices or spears, small bowls of salad in take-home containers, strips of bell peppers. Again, anything easy to eat!

Little bags of almonds are great protein and brain food for the day, as are slices of apple with peanut butter. The options are endless!

One thing we like to do is pack up plastic, zip-top bags of veggies and snacks for the week, so the process in the evening is more streamlined.

These no-bake granola bars are also a great snack option (I categorize them somewhere between a snack food and something healthy). Kids love them. They can help you make them, and you can feel good about packing them!



Page 3 of 6412345678910...Last »
Copyright © 2010-2017, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco