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Family Matters: Baby Dove


Baby DoveOne of the softest things in the world is the feel of your baby’s skin.

It can also be one of the trickiest things to care for.

You don’t want to use anything on baby’s skin that wouldn’t be good for him, and that’s where Dove® comes in. With their long-standing commitment to quality products, Baby Dove is now a line you can feel confident about using on your precious child.

The Baby Dove Rich Moisture line features body washes, lotions and shampoos that keep your baby’s skin and hair soft and vibrant. You can even personalize the Tip to Toe wash and Lotion bottles with your baby’s name!

Baby Dove Sensitive Moisture is great for even the most delicate skin. Choose from body washes, lotions and shampoos. There are even bars and wipes to help meet all your needs.



Family Matters: Baby Survival Must-Haves


Baby Survival Must-HavesWellements™ has the baby remedies you need for the first year and beyond. You can feel good about using them, too!

At Wellements™, the employees are also parents, so they understand that making choices about what you give your little one is a big deal! That is why they put love, countless hours and research into every product. They have created safe, high-quality products that are consistent with the company’s belief that ingredients do matter.

All of the Wellements™ products are:

  • Certified-Organic
  • Preservative-Free
  • Made in glass packaging: No harmful plastics!

Organic Gripe Water: When the crying and fussing just won’t stop!
Wellements™ Organic Gripe Water is an herbal supplement that safely and effectively helps ease occasional stomach discomfort and gas often associated with colic, fussiness and hiccups.*

Baby Tooth Oil: Teething turned happy!
Wellements™ Organic Baby Tooth Oil has a touch of sweetness to help make teething a happier time. The benzocaine-free, belladonna-free and alcohol-free formula is specifically designed to be gentle on baby’s gums.

Baby Move for Constipation: Help your little one move things along!
Wellements™ Organic Baby Move relieves occasional constipation and promotes regular bowel movements.* Designed without the use of harsh laxatives, this organic prune and prebiotic formula is safe and gentle for infants and toddlers starting at 6 months of age.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, and they are the own opinions of the Wellements™ company. These products are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease.



Family Matters: Eczema


Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, is a common condition that affects 10 percent of infants and children. It’s basically dry skin and nothing to worry about.

More scientifically, eczema is a skin condition that usually has two components: dry, easily irritated skin and allergies.

Children with eczema have a tendency toward dry skin and do not retain moisture well. Their skin can take on a dry, rough texture and be prone to irritation. Dry skin can be itchy, leading to scratching that can lead to more irritation. Eczema can really be a vicious cycle for your child.

Underlying allergies can be a big component of eczema, even if you’re not aware of what the allergies may be. Already dry and irritated skin is less able to handle an allergic reaction and heal itself quickly.

Eczema can look like dry skin, with red patches or white bumps, in localized sections or in folds of the skin. It’s rarely covering the body, but it can in severe cases.

The best way to treat eczema is to moisturize from the inside out! Make sure your child stays well-hydrated, and then use an over-the-counter or prescription topical cream, lotion or ointment on their skin regularly.

Avoid irritants like perfumed lotions or detergents.

Try to identify triggers, like foods or environmental factors that may cause flare-ups. Your pediatrician should be able to order allergy testing that can help you identify these things.



Family Matters: Soothing Gas Pains


When my second son was born, he was a champion eater. He also had some award-winning gas pains. He’d draw his legs up toward his tummy and howl after a feeding. It was horrible. Babies get gassy when they swallow air, either when they are feeding, sucking on a pacifier or simply crying.

He ended up having to take a prescription gas-relieving medication, but there are so many things you can try (and we tried) to naturally help relieve gas in your infant.

First, keep their head higher than their body during feedings. That way, the milk sinks to the bottom, and air goes to the top without getting trapped. If you’re bottle-feeding, using a bottle with a collapsible liner allows air to be removed from the bottle as the baby feeds, so there’s not excess air trapped there as well. If bottle-feeding, using a low-flow nipple also helps with reducing air intake.

Burp your baby after feeding, or even during if you’re nursing and switching sides or if baby takes a natural break. Hold him on your shoulder and pat or rub firmly until he belches. If he doesn’t burp, wait a few minutes and try again.

You can help your baby work out gas by laying him on his back and pumping his legs in a bicycle motion. Hopefully this will help him pass gas. Rubbing his belly gently might help as well.

Sometimes a warm bath can also help relax them enough to pass gas.

If the problem is chronic, take a look at what formula you’re using or what you’re eating. You might need to eliminate foods from your diet if you’re nursing or change formulas if you’re bottle-feeding.

Finally, over-the-counter gas drops might provide some relief for your gassy baby! Check with your pediatrician.



Family Matters: First Foods


Around six months old, baby will start eating solid foods!

Some pediatricians recommend the transition around four months; pay attention to your baby. If he’s still vigorously thrusting a spoon out of his mouth at four months, try again at five or six. I think I tried at four months with my first child, which caused some digestive issues, so we tried again at six months with no problem. Jjust pay attention to your child’s needs! Baby should be able to hold his head erect and upper body stable before he starts solid foods.

Cereal is a good first food. I preferred single-grain oatmeal to rice (rice was constipating for both of my boys). I mixed it with breastmilk. You can use formula or water to get it to a consistency your baby can eat easily. Just a few spoonfuls should be enough to start.

When introducing solids, you only want to introduce a new food every three to four days. This way, you can make sure that if baby has a reaction, you know which food he is reacting to. After cereal, mashed avocado is a good one to try, or pureed sweet potato. Cooked and pureed carrots and other nutrient-rich veggies are good first foods. Then, move on to fruits, and cooked and pureed meats after that.

Don’t get discouraged if baby rejects a food once, twice or several times. This is normal! Keep trying. After you’re sure he is not allergic, mix it with something you know he likes to introduce it again.



Family Matters: Potty Training Tips


Potty training may start during this time period in your child’s life, but let me just stress to you that if it doesn’t, don’t fret and don’t push it.

While some little girls may potty train right around age 2, some little boys might not be ready until they’re well over age 3. They will do it when they’re ready. From my experience, there’s only so much you can do until they are ready!

In the meantime, let them pick out some fun underpants! For my younger son, potty training amounted to a basic request, “Don’t pee pee on Thomas the Train, okay?” He didn’t. My older son didn’t care who was on his underwear, however.

Get a potty chair that your child likes. For some, this is a small, freestanding chair. Others might prefer a stool with a potty insert for the “big” potty, like they see mommy, daddy or an older sibling using.

Plan to stay home in the early days of potty learning, and bring them to the potty often. Read books about the potty. Sing songs about the potty. Watch videos about the potty. Camp out on the potty, if necessary. Some children’s first success on the potty is by accident! They just go, realize that’s what all the fuss is about, and that helps them learn.

Some parents choose a reward system. My mom kept a jar of M&M’s® in the bathroom (eww, maybe in the kitchen instead). My brother got one every time he went, after he washed his hands of course. For him, this was major motivation. For your child, it might be a sticker or a success chart.

Praise him when he goes and expect some accidents along the way. Again, just wait until he’s ready!



Family Matters: Teething Pain


Right around this time, if not already, your baby will be sprouting teeth!

For some, this is a painless process, and they seem to wake up one morning with a pearly white popping through their gums. That’s how it was with my first baby; I didn’t even know he was cutting a tooth until he bit me!

My second son didn’t have it so easy. He drooled so constantly that we had to change clothes frequently. His gums were swollen and irritated. He was irritable and didn’t sleep.

There are many ways to help relieve teething pain.

You can give your baby something to gnaw on, like a teething biscuit or a toy designed for teething that’s made of hard plastic that has textures that feel soothing to baby’s gums. My son liked a soft, rubbery teething toy that we kept in the freezer, and I let him gnaw on it when he needed relief. He also liked a cold drink in his sippy cup to help relieve some pain.

A small dose of Tylenol® or ibuprofen is probably fine to help relieve pain, too. Just check with your pediatrician on the correct dosage for your little one.

Some doctors recommend a topical pain reliever, like Orajel™, applied directly to the gums.

Sometimes, you’ll need to try all of the above, but know that this too shall pass!



Family Matters: Sucking to Soothe


Studies (and tons of moms and dads) have shown that most all babies use sucking as a soothing mechanism.

Whether it’s the breast, a bottle, a finger (yours or his own), pacifier or other object, sucking is reflexively soothing to your infant.

You can help facilitate baby learning to self-soothe by leaving his hands free (no mittens or hand coverings) so he can find his fingers, or by providing a pacifier for the times he’s not eating.

Besides sucking to soothe, some babies like motion, white noise or skin-to-skin contact. You might have to try all of these, sometimes in combination, to help meet your baby’s needs. He’ll eventually learn to seek out what he needs and provide it for himself.



Terrible Twos


Last weekend, I watched my friend’s toddler have a meltdown at a birthday party.

No. No. No. He did NOT want to play the game. He did NOT want the green cupcake; he wanted the BLUE cupcake. He did NOT want to sing the appropriate song to the birthday boy.

It was terribly frustrating, and I’d dare say embarrassing for his parents, yet, at the same time, entirely developmentally appropriate. They certainly weren’t the only ones in that same position. (Sophie had to be taken to the car when there weren’t any PINK cupcakes.)

About the time your little wonder wall hits age 2, they begin to develop defiance, and that’s okay. He’s learning to test his limits, and he’s learning what he likes and does not like. He’s also learning how it’s appropriate to vocalize those likes and dislikes, and it’s up to you to teach him how to set those boundaries.

When your toddler screams with rage when it’s time to leave the playground because he doesn’t want to, it’s not your place to give in. It’s time to leave the playground. You might want to manage his expectations by giving him a countdown. “Joshua, we’re going to leave in 2 minutes.” (Toddlers don’t have a great concept of time, but a countdown can help prepare them). “Joshua, we’re going to leave in 1 minute.” Then, you leave. Don’t backtrack on what you say you’re going to do; be consistent.

If there’s not a pink cupcake, give Sophie options. “You can have the green cupcake, or you don’t get a cupcake. What do you choose?” Chances are, Sophie will pick the green cupcake. Remind Sophie that it’s Bryce’s special day, not hers. When it’s HER special day, SHE can pick the pink cupcake.

Also, keep in mind that your toddler needs to go into situations well-rested and well-fed. Keep him on his schedule. If you’re going to a birthday party, make sure he’s had his nap first and eaten his lunch. If you’re going to an unfamiliar house, pack his favorite foods just in case he needs a backup. (See Gerber’s Lil Entrees, below.)

TIP: Gerber’s Lil Entrees are great meals for your toddler to not only feed himself but also get great nutrition. Gerber’s recipes, with entrees like Chicken and Brown Rice with Peas and Corn, are designed specifically for toddlers, with a taste your little one will love, an easy-to-eat texture and the perfect size for easy self-feeding. If your little one doesn’t like his food touching, like my older son didn’t, Gerber made these entrees with two compartments that keep food separate.



The pincer grasp


The pincer grasp is a big deal for your baby to develop during the latter half of their first year.

The pincer grasp, or using their thumb and pointer finger to pick up objects, is a handy movement used for feeding and grabbing objects when playing.

To encourage use of the pincer grasp, give baby small bites of food, like Cheerios if your baby is ready for that kind of food or soft bits of fruits or veggies otherwise, and let him pick them up off of his high chair tray or plate and eat them. Food is always a good incentive!

Board books with peekaboo flaps are also good for using the pincer grasp as baby has to open the flaps to see what’s inside. Activity boards with slider windows, buttons or other knobs also help develop this skill.

TIP: Organics Happy Baby Clearly Crafted Stage 2 pouches are perfect foods for your little one to enjoy. Thick and smooth, these are specially formulated for the child aged 6 months and up exploring the world of solid foods. These foods are all certified USDA organic, non-GMO project verified, gluten-free and kosher without artificial flavors. They do have delicious flavors like Bananas, Sweet Potato and Papaya; Pears, Squash and Blackberries; Apples, Kale and Avocados; Apples, Guava and Beets; Pears, Pumpkin and Passion Fruit; and Pears, Zucchini and Peas.



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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