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Dine In: Stuffed Pork Chops


Stuffed Pork ChopsWe debated going out to dinner Friday night, but it was drizzling. It had been a long week, and we had to catch up on Netflix.

Staying home and dining in won out.

During the week before, Paul had mentioned making stuffed pork chops for dinner, but the New York Strips that were on sale at Brookshire’s won out.

On Friday night, however, we went for the pork chops.

It’s funny how, in all my love of Southern cooking, I’d never stuffed a pork chop. Paul, however, knew just how he wanted to make them. The house smelled amazing while they were cooking, and the result was fabulous.

Stuffed Pork Chops

Ingredients:
4 (2-inch thick) pork loin chops
2 Tbs Cajun seasoning
1 Tbs black pepper
1 lb Jimmy Dean Hot Sausage
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1 box Stouffer’s Cornbread Dressing (including ingredients to prepare it)

Directions:
Cut a slit in the center of each pork chop, creating a pocket. Season each chop with Cajun seasoning and black pepper. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 425° F.

Prepare cornbread dressing mix according to package directions. Set aside.

Brown sausage in a large, oven-proof skillet. Remove meat with a slotted spoon to a large bowl. Stir in chopped green onions and cornbread dressing until well-combined. Stuff 1/4 of each mixture into each chop, pressing meat together to seal.

Reheat the sausage drippings over high heat. Sear each chop in the hot pan, turning once to sear each side. Place pan in the oven; cook for 30 minutes.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 1088, Calories from Fat: 707, Fat: 79 g (28 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 264 mg, Sodium: 1419 mg, Potassium: 1057 mg, Carbohydrates: 26.6 g, Fiber: 1 g, Sugar: 2 g, Protein: 65 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Family Matters: Christmas Baking


Christmas BakingOne of my favorite memories of childhood is helping my mom with the Christmas baking.

Our house always smelled good at holiday time, and there was never a shortage of baked treats to eat. In fact, lunch on Christmas Day was usually Christmas cookies sandwiched between a big breakfast of homemade cinnamon rolls and sausage and the Christmas dinner.

You’d know when the season would start because my mom would make her cinnamon raisin bread. We’d take bundles of those loaves of sweet deliciousness in our arms, and we’d carry them to neighbors and to our teachers who looked forward to them every year. I was back home visiting last year, and someone even asked, “Does your mom still make that raisin bread?” Indeed, she does.

One of the best parts of the raisin bread was helping her knead the dough, punching it down, and wrapping the golden-brown loaves in aluminum foil to deliver to loved ones.

Baking with kids is so much fun. It’s great quality time to spend together over scents of yeast, cinnamon and heaps of sugar.

I loved learning how to knead dough until it was no longer sticky but not yet tough, how to punch it down when it had doubled in volume, and how to never open the oven door when it was baking. I got to talk to mom, too. Sometimes, in a household with five kids, one-on-one time was hard to come by, but I could always count on baking together.

We also baked Christmas cookies, usually three or four varieties, but the highlight of the cookie-baking experience was always the Saturday when we made the sugar cookies. It was an all-day endeavor, and it became a tradition that my mom continues with some of my nephews who live nearby. We’d make the dough the night before, so it would have a chance to chill before we rolled it out and cut the shapes. They included candy canes, stars, trees and even Santa, himself. Then, each kid would get a baking sheet and some decorations, and they could decorate to their hearts’ content. My brother was the painstaking one who’d line up individual sprinkles on the cookies in intricate patterns. My other brother was a dumper: the more colored sugar he could get on a cookie, the better. I was somewhere in between. My favorite part was really creaming together the butter and the sugar to make a light yellow, fluffy cloud of cookie base. It was also being in the kitchen with my mom.

Kids can help with so many Christmas treats. Make a memory and a tradition today by picking out a project to make with them. It doesn’t have to be complicated. Dip pretzel rods in melted chocolate, and roll in Christmas-colored sprinkles. Bake pumpkin bread or pecan pie. Whatever you choose, food, family and fun make the holidays special.



Shop the Sale: Turkey Talk


Turkey TalkIt’s time to talk turkey, since the big day is coming right up.

First of all, go ahead and buy your turkey this week since they’re on sale at Brookshire’s.

Secondly, don’t forget to take it out of the freezer in time. Been there, done that. Give it three to five days to thaw in the refrigerator, depending on the size of the bird.

Last year, we smoked our turkey. This year, we’re going to roast it, but we’re also going to brine the bird.

Brining is simply soaking the bird in a solution of salt and some acid (and a little sweetness) to lock the juices into the bird before cooking. It’s like marinating the turkey because your bird will absorb the fluids and flavors by osmosis. Brine your turkey for 18 to 24 hours before roasting it for best results.

Your brine can consist of almost anything, but you want to make sure to use 1 cup kosher salt and 1/2 cup sugar for every gallon of brine you make. You’ll probably need at least two gallons to cover your turkey.

You can flavor your brine with slices of citrus like lemons or limes; with sliced apples; with lots of fresh herbs like sprigs of rosemary and sage or chunks of ginger; or with cloves of garlic. You can use cider or broth in place of the water (although if you’re using cider or something sweeter, I’d only replace half of the water).

After you’ve mixed all the ingredients together until well-combined, submerge your turkey, and place in the refrigerator. Some people feel safe brining in a clean cooler, but I don’t trust Texas weather to keep it cool enough. You can use a roasting bag, a large stockpot/baking pan or whatever vessel is large enough to hold your turkey and the brine and still fit in the fridge.

For extra-crispy skin when you roast the bird, remove from brine the night before Thanksgiving and let dry. Rub with butter and herbs; replace in the refrigerator, UNCOVERED, overnight. Bring to room temperature for an hour before roasting.



Healthy Living: Perimeter Shopping


Perimeter ShoppingI ran into one of my uber-healthy friends while grocery shopping this morning. In addition to the fact that she’s beautiful, fit and ENJOYS eating celery, I was wearing scuzzy clothes and didn’t have on any makeup. Of course, that’s pretty much the law when you leave the house in a state of disrepair. The best I had going for me is that I was clean.

However, makeup and T-shirt aside, I found myself wanting to hide my shopping cart from her. Oh yeah, I had salmon, broccoli, zucchini and grapes, but I also had frozen waffles and ice cream. Hey, they are for my KIDS, okay?

Then, I started thinking that I should probably shop so that I don’t feel the need to hide my cart when a healthy eater walks by. My next thought was that I should do a better job of emphasizing healthy choices to my kids.

I put the frozen waffles back. My son will be just as happy with Greek yogurt for protein and dairy, and a banana for fruit and fiber. The other son can have real scrambled eggs instead of a frozen breakfast pastry.

I left the ice cream because I think it’s fine for growing, active kids to have a treat every once in a while.

One of the best ways to shop in a healthy way is to shop the perimeter of the grocery store, where the fresh fruits and vegetables are stored, along with the meats and dairy. I really do love walking through the Brookshire’s produce department and seeing the beautiful displays of colorful fruits and veggies.

Maybe next time I run into her, I won’t feel the need to hide my cart.

I’ll try to be wearing some makeup as well.

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Product Talk: Louisburg Honeycrisp Apple Cider


Louisburg Honeycrisp Apple CiderLouisburg Honeycrisp Apple Cider reminds me of picking apples on Carter’s Mountain and being able to taste the cider pressed right after the apples came out of the field.

Louisburg Cider Mill aims for exactly that flavor. It captures the freshness and bright sweetness of a honeycrisp apple, and bottles it for Brookshire’s customers.

The Mill in Louisburg, Kansas processes apples at the peak of freshness, so your cider tastes like it was just poured from the tree itself.

“Our cider-making method dates back 2,000 years, and it still produces the best quality cider,” the Louisburg Mill website says. “We continue our old-fashioned methods in the manufacture of our many other products as well.”

Look for Louisburg Honeycrisp Apple Cider near the honeycrisp apples in your Brookshire’s produce department. This cider is delicious at room temperature, chilled or even served warm, with a cinnamon stick for stirring.



Copyright © 2010-2018, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

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