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Product Talk: Atlantic salmon


Scared of cooking salmon at home? Don’t be. With our precise instructions, anybody who can set a timer can sear salmon like a pro.

Salmon is a popular fish for a reason – it’s meaty, tasty AND heart-healthy. (It’s full of those Omega-3 fats we’re all supposed to be eating.) And yet it’s one of the easiest, most forgiving fish to grill, sauté or sear.

With this precisely timed recipe, all the salmon needs is a few minutes in a hot pan, plus a squirt of lemon juice or a sprinkle of fresh herbs to “finish” it if you desire.  Serve with a side of rice and a green vegetable for a heart-healthy meal worthy of a restaurant chef, but at affordable, cook-at-home prices.

PAN-SEARED SALMON

Serves 4

Ingredients:
4 salmon fillets (skin-on), each about 6 ounces and 1 to 1 1/4 inches thick
Salt and ground black pepper

Directions:
1. Heat a 12-inch heavy-bottomed skillet for 3 minutes over high heat. Sprinkle salmon with salt and ground black pepper.

2. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. When oil shimmers (but does not smoke) add fillets skin side down and cook, without moving fillets, until pan regains lost heat, about 30 seconds. Reduce heat to medium-high; continue to cook until skin side is well browned and bottom half of fillets turns opaque, 4 1/2 minutes. Turn fillets and cook, without moving them, until they are no longer translucent on the exterior and are firm, but not hard, when gently squeezed: 3 minutes for medium-rare and 3 1/2 minutes for medium. Remove fillets from pan; let stand 1 minute. Pat with paper towel to absorb excess fat on surface, if desired. Serve immediately.



Shop the sale: Shrimp with pasta


Seafood is traditional during Lent, which starts today – I’m pretty sure that, growing up, we all ate a lot of fish sticks during this season. So this week, we have special prices on lots of your favorite fish and shellfish, including Atlantic salmon, tilapia, and my favorite, shell-on shrimp.

This shrimp dish is easy to throw together – even if you have to clean the shrimp, you can get it on the table in 30 minutes or less, so it’s perfect for a quick after-work supper.

You can substitute other favorite fresh herbs, depending on your tastes, but I don’t recommend dried herbs for this dish; they just won’t give it the depth of flavor.

Shrimp with Capellini and Herbs

Ingredients:
Makes 4 servings

1 pound capellini (angel hair) pasta
1/4 cup olive oil, divided
1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 garlic cloves, sliced
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup chopped fresh chives
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1-2 tsp. Kosher salt
Pepper to taste

Directions:
Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Cook the pasta according to package directions until al dente. Drain and set aside in a large bowl. Toss with 2 tablespoons of olive oil.

In a large skillet, heat the remaining olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the shrimp and the garlic and salt and pepper. Sauté the shrimp until they are pink on both sides, about 2 or 3 minutes. Add the pasta to the skillet along with the herbs, lemon juice, and salt. Toss to coat. (Note: To make it easier use a separate large mixing bowl to toss all ingredients)

Serve immediately.



Dine-In: New Orleans Fried Oysters


Gear up for Mardi Gras next week with this classic New Orleans-style dish – fried oysters.

This recipe gets some heat from the cayenne pepper, but if you like it hotter, kick it up a notch with up a little extra cayenne.

These are good all by themselves, hot out of the fryer with a little squeeze of fresh lemon juice or dunked into a side of cocktail sauce. (Serve guests their own ramekin of cocktail sauce and put out some hot sauce on the side, so each can doctor it to their own level of heat.) Or to really channel that Mardi Gras feeling, turn them into oyster po’boys: Stuff hoagie rolls with fried oysters (at least six per roll), lettuce, tomato, and a good squeeze of tartar sauce. And let the good times at the table roll.

FRIED OYSTERS

Serves 6-8

Ingredients:
3/4  cup fine-ground cornmeal
3/4  cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/2  tsp. salt
3/4  tsp. ground black pepper
1/4  tsp.  Cayenne pepper
1 pound shucked Oysters , in their liquor (about 45 oysters)
5 – 6 cups peanut or vegetable oil
Lemon wedges

Directions:
Heat the oven to 200 degrees.

In a large, shallow dish, mix together cornmeal, flour, salt, pepper, and cayenne. In a separate, medium bowl, combine all oysters with their liquor (juices) and remove any bits of shell.  Using a slotted spoon, scoop up about 8 oysters, briefly allowing the excess liquor to drip off, and scatter them across the cornmeal mixture. Shake the dish to coat the oysters evenly with cornmeal mixture. Transfer the oysters to a baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining oysters.

Heat 1 inch of oil in a large, heavy-bottomed Dutch oven over high heat until the oil reaches a temperature of 400 degrees. Drop 1/3 of the breaded oysters (about 15 oysters) in the hot oil. Using a wire skimmer, stir and poke at the oysters as they fry to prevent them from fusing together. Adjust the heat as necessary to keep the oil at 400 degrees. Remove the oysters from the hot oil with the wire skimmer when they have turned golden brown and the frying has slowed, about 1 minute.

Transfer the oysters to a plate lined with several layers of paper towel, then transfer to oven to keep warm. Return the oil to 400 degrees and repeat with remaining oysters. Serve with lemon wedges or dipping sauce.

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Posted in: Dine In, Seafood


Shrimp with Rosemary Skewers


Grilling Goodness!

Ingredients:
6 (6-8 inch) Rosemary sprigs
12 Large Shrimp, peeled and deveined (keep tails on)
2 teaspoon Olive Oil
3/4 teaspoon Seasoned Salt
3/4 teaspoon Garlic Powder with Parsley

Directions:
Remove rosemary leave to within 2 inches of the tip.  Soak sprigs in water for 4 hours.  Remove sprigs from water.   Skewer 2 shrimp per sprig.  Brush each side of shrimp with oil and sprinkle with Seasoned Salt and Garlic Powder with Parsley.  Grill over medium-high heat, until shrimp turn opaquie and pink about 2 to 4 minutes.  Turn once during grill time.

Recommended wine pairing:  Chardonnay, Moscato or Sweet Red



Product Talk: Catfish-Beyond the fryer


If, like most of us, you’re trying to eat more healthily, you probably know you should be eating more fish. 

Personally, I love just about every kind of seafood, cooked almost any way. But I know  many people who think they only like fried fish, or that they don’t really like fish at all.  So I always like to recommend a widely available fish that almost everybody knows and likes: Catfish. 

Sure, you probably grew up thinking the only way to eat it was fried, preferably with hush puppies on the side. But today’s farm-raised catfish is so mild and meaty, it tastes great prepared many ways – grilled, baked, sautéed, poached or just popped under the broiler for a few minutes. And because catfish is so mild, it pairs well with a strongly flavored sauce or lots of herbs, especially dried or fresh dill or spicy, Cajun-style seasonings. 

And, if you don’t fry it, catfish is a really good choice for a low-fat, heart-healthy diet. It’s sometimes overlooked because, compared to fattier fish like salmon and mackerel, catfish does not contain as much of the omega-3 fatty acids that are associated with good heart health. However, catfish is relatively low in total fat and saturated fat, and high in protein. And it also has more omega-3s than a comparable serving of hamburger, steak, or chicken. 

One more thing – catfish is a relatively sustainable fish. That means, unlike some species that are being overfished in the world’s oceans, lakes and rivers, catfish are responsibly raised by farmers in fresh-water ponds. U.S.-raised catfish, like you’ll find at Brookshire’s, are fed high-quality grain that contribute to their mild flavor. Catfish sold at Brookshire’s come from a plant in Hughes Springs, Texas, which has attained Best Aquaculture Practices certification. 

Because they are farmed, not wild-caught, catfish filets have always tended to be more reasonably priced than many other forms of seafood. However, over the past several months, you may have noticed higher prices for catfish. That’s because as more corn has gone into ethanol production, catfish feed prices have risen sharply, causing some catfish farmers to turn to other ventures. That’s created a catfish shortage. However, I’m happy to report that the shortage is easing up; you may already be seeing lower prices. 

If you’d like to move beyond the deep-fryer, this easy grilled catfish dish is a great one to start with. The dill sauce adds lots of flavor, but because it calls for low-fat dressing, not a ton of fat. The filets will cook in only about ten minutes.  If you’re uncomfortable putting fish on the grill, you can prepare this recipe according to instructions but then bake it in a 350-degree oven for about 7-10 minutes, or until fish is just starting to flake. (Thinner filets will need slightly less time; thicker pieces will need the maximum.)

http://brookshires.mywebgrocer.com/RecipeDetails.aspx?Pos=0&Search=catfish&SRC2=0&RecipeID=1841&cc=1&s=157366646&g=bea86b31-3622-4957-8ed3-6233a61f4b33&uc=DC97B



Fish Tacos


Ingredients:
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1/8 tsp salt
1/8 tsp garlic powder
1 1/2 lbs red snapper or white fish fillets
8 6-inch corn tortillas
2 cups shredded cabbage
8 Tbs Leigh Oliver’s Creamy Jalapeño Dip 

Garnish: chopped cilantro and radishes
Directions:
Preheat oven to 425° F. To prepare tacos, combine cumin, smoked paprika, salt and garlic powder in a small bowl. Sprinkle spice mixture evenly over both sides of fish. Place fish on a baking sheet that has been sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork and is opaque. Place fish in a bowl, and gently break into pieces with a fork. Cover tortillas with damp towel and heat in microwave on low until warmed through, about 30 seconds. Divide fish evenly among tortillas; top each with 1/4 cup cabbage and 1 tablespoon Leigh Oliver’s Creamy Jalapeño Dip.

Serve immediately with optional garnishes.



Product Talk: Canned Tuna


Why do we snub our noses at canned tuna? It’s a great, healthy food and it’s convenient, too! If tuna salad and tuna casserole are all you can think of, maybe you need to think again!

Tuna can make a quick weeknight supper. Stir a can into tomato sauce, add some spices and crushed red pepper. Serve over hot pasta and you’ll be a convert! Or add some tuna and roasted red peppers to your favorite tossed salad for a protein boost….or melt tuna, shredded cheddar and a tomato slice on an English muffin. See what we mean?

Canned tuna generally comes in light, white and albacore varieties. White and albacore (terms are used interchangeably) are generally milder and chunkier. You can also find tuna in pouches rather than cans. Many prefer the flavor of pouched tuna, since it doesn’t have water or broth included. It’s also very easy to take as a portable lunch!

Interested in tuna trivia? Check out Tuna Facts here:

http://www.healthytuna.com/about-tuna/tuna-facts



Dine-In: Grilling Salmon


Seafood has never been my favorite category of food. I always eat fish for their omega-3 fatty acids, but have not really enjoyed it. A few weeks ago I was in a restaurant in Chicago looking over the menu. I looked at the chicken, which is normally what I pick, then the salmon and beef. The salmon came with roasted sweet carrots, asparagus and potatoes. The vegetables sounded delicious so, out of character, I selected the salmon. After one bite of the salmon I knew I made the right choice. As soon as I got back to Texas all I wanted was cedar plank salmon.
 
This weekend I strongly suggest grilling salmon for you and your family. Fresh salmon will give you the best results, but frozen will work just fine. Drizzle a little extra virgin olive oil over your salmon; make sure the fish is evenly coated. Sprinkle your favorite seasoning over the fish. When I grill salmon I normally use either Julio’s or citrus grilling seasoning. Preheat your grill to medium heat. I recommend using either a fish basket or cedar plank to grill your fish. I personally enjoy using cedar planks to grill my fish. If you use the planks, soak them in water for at least an hour before grilling. Place your fish on the grill and grill for 5 minutes for every ½-inch thickness. I hope you and your family enjoy grilling salmon this weekend!



Dine-In: Crab Cakes


Crab Cakes

Serves: 6

Prep Time: 20 minutes        Cook Time: 10 minutes 

Ingredients:

1 lb lump crabmeat

3 Food Club Eggs

1 tsp Food Club Yellow Mustard

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 tsp ground cayenne pepper

1 Tbs Worcestershire sauce

1 lemon, juiced

1/2 cup chopped bell pepper

1/4 cup chopped green onions

3/4 cup fresh breadcrumbs

3/4 cup crushed crackers

1 Tbs Food Club Extra-Virgin Olive Oil 

Directions:

In a large bowl combine all crab cake ingredients except olive oil and shape into patties. In a skillet add olive oil and patties; brown for 5 to 6 minutes, flip and cook for an additional 3 minutes.  

Nutritional Information:  Calories per Serving: 232, Fat: 9 g (2 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 169 mg, Sodium: 455 mg, Carbohydrates: 17 g, Fiber: 1 g, Protein: 21 g. 

© 2011, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



Salmon Waldorf Salad


Prep Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 4 

Salad:

Ingredients:
1 (14.75 oz) can traditional pack salmon or
2 (6 oz) pouches skinless, boneless salmon, drained and chunked
2 ribs celery, diced
1 large apple, chopped
1/2 cup chopped walnuts 

Dressing:

Ingredients:
1/2 cup low-fat mayonnaise
1/4 cup plain non-fat yogurt
1/4 tsp lemon-pepper seasoning
1/2 tsp dried thyme
1/4 tsp salt 

Directions:
In a small bowl combine mayonnaise, yogurt, lemon-pepper seasoning, thyme and salt. In a large bowl combine salmon, celery, apple and walnuts. Pour dressing over salad. 

Nutritional Information:  Calories Per Serving: 354 Fat: 21 g (3 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 65



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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