share. The Brookshire's Blog

Product Talk: Red Diamond Tea

Red Diamond TeaWhere’s a girl to get unsweet tea around these parts?

Brookshire’s, of course.

I know I might be the only person in the Lone Star State who doesn’t drink sweet tea, but I like my tea crisp and devoid of any kind of sweetener.

At Brookshire’s, I can get Red Diamond Tea already brewed in a gallon or in a 12-ounce bottle (I pack those in my lunch.) without having to worry about it being sweet.

Of course, if I wanted it sweet, Red Diamond has that, too.

Red Diamond is freshly brewed right before it’s bottled for a clear, distinct flavor. The tea always tastes fresh and is never muddy.

I even love grabbing a bottle on-the-go from the refrigerated section near the juice and drinking it on the way home.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk

Product Talk: Talenti Gelato

I’ve told you before that I lived overseas for almost four years after I graduated from college.

While I lived in a small hamlet in Germany, I was able to travel extensively.

One of the places I loved the most was Italy. I think it’s genetic; my maiden name is “Brocato,” after all. My dad’s family is from Sicily; my mom’s family is scattered around Northern Italy. I’ve got all kinds of Italian heritage.

My ancestry really is neither here nor there; anyone can enjoy Italy (and should!). In fact, there’s a grotto restaurant on the Mediterranean Sea that I want to bring my boyfriend, Paul, to someday. He’s Irish. Again, that doesn’t matter.

One of the most magnificent things about Italy (aside from the ancient architecture, history, landscapes, art and culture) is the food. I could die happy if I could spend a year in Tuscany learning authentic Italian cooking. I could also probably die happy just eating there.

I will never forget my first visit to Florence. It was there, in the shadows of the Ponte Vecchio on a medieval arch bridge over the Arno River, that I experienced gelato for the first time. Gelato is a combination of ice cream and sherbet in a light, airy, rich and creamy frozen dessert. It was heavenly. I had an espresso flavor and marveled over the dichotomy of light and rich.

Brookshire’s has recaptured that moment for me, in the form of Talenti Gelato. Found in the frozen section (duh), the gelato conjures up that warm spring afternoon on the bridge in Florence. Talenti Gelato is made from scratch with only the finest ingredients imported from around the world, according to the company’s website. They start with fresh milk straight from the farm and fine, pure cane sugar – absolutely never high-fructose corn syrup. They hand-pour the sugar from large sacks, blend in the milk and add the finest ingredients sourced from all around the world to craft their 26 flavors of gelato and sorbetto, their website confirms.

My taste buds confirm this is true.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk

Product Talk: Frozen Meatballs

This year, for the first time in a long time, I was invited to a Super Bowl party. I’m not sure if the invites tapered off because (1.) I’m not a huge football fan, (2.) I’m known to fall asleep before 8pm or (3.) because I’m not a good cook and no one wants my potluck dish.

Okay, we can eliminate No. 3, but No. 1 and 2 are viable reasons.

However, I was invited this year (I didn’t fall asleep and I knew which two teams were playing), and I brought a delicious antipasto platter that was scarfed up immediately.

My friend, Mathilda, made a dish that took the basic cocktail meatball to a whole new level, though. These bite-sized appetizers were delicious.

I can’t wait to try them myself.

Cheesy Meatball Cups

2 (8 oz) cans crescent rolls
flour, for dusting
5 oz queso fresco, crumbled
16 frozen meatballs
1/2 cup garlic spaghetti sauce
1 Tbs fresh parsley, finely chopped

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Prepare two muffin tins (16 molds total) with nonstick cooking spray.

Extend dough on a lightly floured surface. Pull apart dough triangles and press each inside a muffin mold, covering the bottom of mold and pressing up the sides.

Sprinkle each dough cup with 1 teaspoon shredded cheese. Place a meatball on top of cheese, lightly pressing into the dough.

Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven and top with 1 teaspoon of sauce and 1 teaspoon shredded cheese. Place back in the oven and bake for 10 more minutes, or until dough is golden-brown and the cheese bubbles.

Serve with a sprinkle of fresh parsley.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 170, Calories from Fat: 86, Fat: 10 g (4 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 13 mg, Sodium: 465 mg, Potassium: 10 mg, Carbohydrates: 14 g, Fiber: 1 g, Sugar: 3 g, Protein: 6 g

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

Product Talk: Smart Ones Breakfast Quesadillas

Smart Ones Breakfast QuesadillasI have high standards for my breakfast.

First of all, it has to be delicious.

Second, it has to be portable. I eat in the car. Not ideal, but such is life.

Third, it has to be nutritionally sound. I never know what my day is going to bring, so I have to have the proper fuel for whatever comes my way.

Enter Smart Ones Breakfast Quesadillas.

They are delicious. I love how the egg and the cheese get all warm and melty, and the turkey bacon provides a nice textural contrast. The red and green peppers are pretty, too.

I can eat them in the car without trashing my vehicle. No crumbs, no mess, no spills. They also only take a little over two minutes in the microwave, so I can grab it as I’m walking out the door.

They are nutritionally sound. Each quesadilla contains 230 calories with 7 grams of fat, 7 grams of fiber and 12 grams of protein.

Really, what more could you ask for?

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk

Product Talk: Sister Schubert’s Parker House Style Rolls

Sister Schubert’s Parker House Style RollsParker House Rolls are admittedly one of those things I usually only think about during the holidays. However, today I knew I had a package in the freezer that were left over from Thanksgiving, so I decided to pull them out to serve with the beef stew had slow cooking.

They were as delicious today as they would have been in November.

A Parker House roll is a bread roll made by flattening the center of a ball of dough with a rolling pin so that it becomes an oval shape and then folding the oval in half. They are made with milk and are generally quite buttery, soft and slightly sweet with a crispy shell. They were invented at the Parker House Hotel in Boston during the 1870s.

The Sister Schubert Company has prepared Parker House Rolls in a quick-baking, frozen method to make life easier on us.

Sister Schubert’s Parker House Style Rolls have zero trans fats, no preservatives and no artificial flavors. In other words, they taste homemade. You simply take them out of the plastic packaging and leave them in their foil pan. Just bake for a few minutes until heated through. You get the homemade taste without the homemade work!

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk

Product Talk: White Pepper

When my boyfriend said he was making dinner on Christmas Eve, he brought everything he needed with him. He’s good that way.

He even brought the spices he needed, including one I didn’t have: white pepper.

White pepper is also from the pepper plant (like black pepper), but this outer layer of the plant is removed before or after drying, leaving only the inner seed. (For black pepper, the fruit is left on the plant until ripe and sun-dried.)

White pepper tastes hotter than black but is less complex with fewer flavor notes. Often used for aesthetic reasons like to avoid “specs” in mashed potatoes, white pepper is often used in French cooking.

We used it in mashed potatoes. I liked the depth of flavor the white pepper adds; it gives the dish a heat that takes a minute to register on your palate. While I don’t care about “specs” in my food, it does make it taste delicious, and that’s all that really matters.

Product Talk: Smithfield Bacon

Smithfield BaconI just realized that I write about bacon a lot.

However, I don’t know anyone who doesn’t like, OK, LOVE, bacon.

Smithfield Bacon with Sea Salt is one of my favorite brands. Nestled in the refrigerated case at Brookshire’s, the Smithfield Bacon with Sea Salt still has a salty flavor with less sodium than regular cured bacon.

I will admit being partial to this product because the company was founded in 1936 in Smithfield, Virginia, as a small meat-packing company along the James River.

Well, I’m from Virginia, and Smithfield isn’t that far from my hometown of Richmond. Every year, when we drove east to go to the beach on summer vacation, we’d pass through Smithfield where the company is still thriving and the backbone of the town. It smells SO GOOD when you drive through. The smell of smoky meats just hang in the air in Smithfield no matter the time of day. You might also have heard of Smithfield hams, perhaps the most famous of the company’s pork products.

The bacon cooks up to crisp perfection.

Grab some today.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk

Product Talk: Ryvita Dark Rye Crispbread

Ryvita Dark Rye CrispbreadYou call it a cracker; we call it crispbread.

I kind of like the way “crispbread” sounds, don’t you?

Basically, Ryvita Dark Rye Crispbreads are savory crackers full of flavor that you can find in the frozen foods section at Brookshire’s.

Ryvita Crispbread is known for its naturally crisp texture, mild nutty taste and excellent nutritional value. (They’re chock full of fiber.) Ryvita products are all made with rye, are kosher-certified and are low in fat, sugar and salt. Ryvita is baked using pure natural ingredients with no added artificial preservatives, additives or chemicals.

A fun alternative to a traditional cracker, these are great topped with cheeses, meats, fruits, spreads and anything else you can imagine. The texture really sets them apart from other crackers, and the taste is much more robust.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk

Product Talk: David Wade’s Worcestershire Powder

You’ve heard of Worcestershire sauce, but have you ever used Worcestershire powder?

Once you do, you’ll be hooked.

Invented by Texas celebrity chef David Wade, one of the original television chefs, Worcestershire Powder is delicious rubbed into any red meat, poultry, seafood, vegetables or Asian dishes. It’s also darn good in a Bloody Mary.

Essentially a dehydrated Worcestershire sauce, the product touts that it “permeates the food and magnifies its flavor to bring out the mouthwatering goodness of any dish.”

That it does. I promise you.

The first time my boyfriend cooked for me, he used it on the most beautiful steaks I’d ever seen. He had rubbed Worcestershire powder into the steaks well before I’d arrived that evening, so when I took my first bite, I thought I’d died and gone to heaven. Surely a man who could cook a steak like this was right up there in the celestial rankings. His secret, beyond the fact he’s just good at the grill, was Worcestershire powder. We’ve since had it on all cuts of steak and a prime rib, and I’m going to use it in some enchiladas shortly. It’s good stuff.

David Wade, who retired in Tyler, Texas, was an award-winning chef, newspaper columnist, radio personality, hymn singer, cookbook author, television fixture and cookbook author. He’s as known for his neat ascot and crested blazer as he is for his eloquence, showmanship and delicious Worcestershire powder.

Found on the aisle near the condiments and Worcestershire sauce, the distinctive brown paper packaging calls out to be used. Listen to it.

Product Talk: Owens Smoked Sausage Kolaches

Owens Smoked Sausage KolachesBack in my grad school days, I lived within striking distance of West, Texas. Not to be confused with the geographic region, West is a town as well-known for West Fest and The Czech Stop as it is for being the scene of a tragic fertilizer plant explosion a few years ago.

West, Texas, was settled by people of Czechoslovakian descent, and arguably the best food in town is to be had at The Czech Stop.

While it looks like a gas station (admittedly, it’s next to one), The Czech Stop serves up the very best authentic, homemade kolaches in the state of Texas.

Southerners call kolaches by different names: kolaches or pigs in a blanket, usually. The very best ones are in West.

I tried to duplicate them myself but failed miserably until I happened upon Bob Evans’ Owens Smoked Sausage Kolaches in the frozen foods aisle of Brookshire’s, near the breakfast foods.

A tender sausage link is encased in a mass of flaky doughiness for a heavenly treat that’s easy to heat in a toaster oven or microwave for a quick breakfast or snack. They could easily be a main dish or a party staple as well. Owens sausage, with its world-renown, gives these kolaches a full-bodied flavor that would be enviable in certain other cities.

My son eats them, along with Greek yogurt, every morning.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk

Page 4 of 2912345678910...Last »
Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS