share. The Brookshire's Blog

Product Talk: New, improved Food Club Soda Sweepstakes – Win $50 loaded to your Thank You Card!


Each week during August, beginning August 3, 2011 through 11:59 p.m. CDT, August 30, 2011 we are randomly giving away $50 to be loaded to your Brookshire’s Thank You Card. 

Customers who email their name, phone number, and Brookshire’s Thank You Card number to facebook@brookshires.com will be entered for a chance to win the Brookshire’s Food Club Soda Sweepstakes (“Sweepstakes”). Not responsible for lost, late, or misdirected entries not received in time for the random drawings, faulty machinery or other mechanical error, or information entered incorrectly. Limit one (1) entry per Thank You Card number per week. Entries must be received by 11:59PM CDT, 08/30/11.   View the Food Club Soda bracket!

See official rules for details.  View our Privacy Policy.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Product Talk: The whole chicken


Back in the day, any cook worth her (or his) salt knew how to handle a whole chicken. Whether you roasted it, stewed it, or cut it apart for frying, that’s just how chickens came at the market. 

Today, however, many people seem to be intimidated by a whole chicken –even though it is a much more economical choice. It’s just too easy to pick up a package of skinless breasts, or thigh quarters, rather than wrestle with a full chicken, bones, skin, and all.

But if you know how to cook a real chicken, you’ll save money , as they can cost less than half what you might pay for specialized packages of prepared, boned or skinless chicken. And, you’ll find the flavor is often richer and deeper, since you’re getting flavor from all the fat, skin and bones.

If you don’t want to mess with cutting up a chicken, there are three easy ways to cook the bird whole, with almost no mess and fuss. Note: Always remove any “innards” such as neck or giblets, from inside the chicken cavity, before cooking.

Crockpot: This is stupid-simple, and produces a really moist dish.  Roughly chop a couple of onions and carrots and place in the crockpot, then add a three-to-four-pound chicken, seasoned with salt, pepper and any herbs or spices you like. You don’t need liquid. Cook for four-five hours, and the chicken will be falling-off-the-bone tender. Bonus: If you pick the meat off the bones before serving, you can make chicken stock from the carcass. Just add more carrots, chopped celery, and maybe some thyme, and enough water to reach the top of the crockpot. Cook on low 6 to 8 hours, or overnight.

Stew: Almost as easy as the crockpot. Use the same carrot-onion-herb combo as in a crockpot chicken; you may also want to add some celery. Place everything in a large stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and cook on low up to about 90 minutes. Again, it’s done when the meat is tender and pulls away easily from the bone. Tip: For a richer flavor, replace some of the water with chicken broth.

Roast: Baking a chicken can be the trickiest way to go, because it’s easy to overcook it and end up with a dry bird. I recommend the use of a meat thermometer. This country-style roasted chicken, reminiscent of an old-fashioned Sunday dinner, is a good recipe to start with:

http://brookshires.mywebgrocer.com/RecipeDetails.aspx?Pos=0&Search=whole%20chicken&SRC2=94&RecipeID=3016&cc=1&s=163621546&g=20f32517-1188-4840-9708-c630c05db238&uc=DC97B

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Product talk: Delicious “donut” peaches


A doughnut peach isn’t much to look at, at least compared to a beautifully shaped, traditional peach. A doughnut peach is small, flat and kind of squashed, almost like it got stuck under the wheels of a grocery buggy. 

But once you try one, you’ll understand why your mother always told you to never judge a book by its cover.  Doughnut peaches are really delicious – sweeter and often juicier than most regular, full-sized peaches, with a slightly different flavor that some people think tastes like almonds.

Doughnut peaches – which are also called saucer peaches, Saturn peaches and UFO peaches by some growers – are not some weird, recently developed hybrid. They’re an actual peach variety that has been grown for centuries in China, and was first planted in the United States more than 100 years ago. It’s only been a few years, however, that doughnut peaches were rediscovered by U.S. growers, and have been widely available in supermarkets here.

They’re getting more popular fast, though, and as a peach fan, I understand why.  Because they’re small and fit nicely in the palm of your hand, they’re easier, and less messy, to eat than a regular peach. (Kids especially seem to like them, because of their cute, petite size.  And the name. Who doesn’t want to eat something called “donut”?)

Doughnut peaches are also freestone, meaning  the small  pit doesn’t cling to the flesh of the peach. Again, that makes it easier, and less messy, to eat. The skin has just a thin layer of fuzz,  so if you’re one of those who don’t like the fuzzy skin of regular peaches, you may happily eat this one without peeling it.

Finally, doughnut peaches also have a slightly later growing season than many other varieties. They’re at peak freshness now and into the fall.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Product Talk: Gluten-free Rice Krispies


The simple Rice Krispie Treat is one of the joys of childhood, not to mention one of the staples of the elementary school bake sale. But for some kids, and adults, the traditional confection is off-limits. That’s because the traditional Rice Krispies formulation contains gluten, making the cereal a no-go for people who have celiac disease or certain food allergies or sensitivities. 

The new Gluten-Free Rice Krispies cereal changes that.  Like many foods, the gluten in original Rice Krispies is kind of hidden. Regular rice also does not contain gluten in and of itself. But the original formulation of the cereal contains malt flavoring, which does. 

This new version is made with brown rice instead of white. But more importantly, it does not contain that malt flavoring.

 The gluten-free version also contains slightly less sugar than the original, less than one gram per one-cup serving. But otherwise, they look and taste very similar to the classic version. 

And, yes, most importantly – they produce that trademark Snap! Crackle! Pop! as soon as you pour on the milk. 

You can substitute this gluten-free cereal in your favorite recipes. This fun-to-make (and gluten-free) treat is a good change of pace from regular Rice Krispie treats. Check the label on the caramels you choose to make sure they are gluten free. Kraft is one variety that is gluten free.

Try this recipe:

http://brookshires.mywebgrocer.com/RecipeDetails.aspx?Pos=0&Search=rice%20krispie&SRC2=118&RecipeID=4808&cc=1&s=160827854&g=1c49f65b-5365-4a50-bc27-db740c12681a&uc=DC97B

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Product Talk: New, improved, Food Club Sodas!


On a hot day like today, a cool, refreshing soft drink sounds like just the ticket. Especially one of our new, improved Food Club sodas, with better taste, new packaging and some exciting new flavors, all at the great prices you’ve come to expect from Food Club.

Have you tried one yet? Our Food Club soda lineup now includes 17 flavors, including five diet varieties. 

We’re especially proud to introduce three new flavors:

  •   Vanilla Cream: The old-fashioned, American favorite.
  •   Cherry Cola: Our great cola taste, perked up with sweet cherry flavor.
  •   Cola Zero: All the taste, zero calories!

We’ve updated and improved all our flavors, creating brighter, fresher tastes. But all your old favorites are still in the soda lineup, including grape, lemon-lime, root beer, strawberry, orange, diet lemon-lime, diet root beer and regular diet cola.

By the way, we’ve updated the packaging too. Food Club sodas are still available in  two-liter bottles, great for a crowd, and 12-ounce cans. But now, if you prefer the convenience of a reclosable bottle, try our new 6-packs of 16.9 ounce plastic bottles – great when you’re on the go!

Each week during August, we are randomly giving away $50 to be loaded to your Brookshire’s Thank You Card.  Just send your Thank You Card number to facebook@brookshires.com for a chance to win.  View the Food Club Soda bracket!  Contest starts on Wednesday, August 3, 2011.

See official rules for details.  View our Privacy Policy.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Product Talk: Pork Butt


The cut of pork known as pork butt doesn’t get much as much respect as trendier, leaner, and fancier  cuts like pork tenderloin.

But I really prefer pork butt for many dishes, especially pulled pork sandwiches and tacos. Think of it as the pork version of pot roast. Because it’s got better marbling and higher fat content, it stays moist and cooks up tender, especially if you use a slow-cooking method like a crockpot. (Pork loin and pork tenderloin are both easy to overcook, giving you a dried-out, tough piece of meat.)

Pork butt also has a deeper, richer, meatier flavor than some of those other “white-meat” pork cuts.  And it absorbs flavor nicely during cooking, without a lot of work. If you’re cooking in the oven or a crockpot, for instance, you can just coat the meat with a dry rub before cooking. Or to create the Mexican dish known as carnitas, great in tacos, cook with chiles and orange juice, or another citrus.

Plus, did I mention it’s affordable, often just about half the price of leaner cuts?

This recipe makes a great weekend supper, and makes enough that you can invite a few friends. If you’re short on time, you can use your favorite prepared barbecue sauce instead of putting together homemade.

Oven Pulled Pork with Homemade BBQ Sauce

Serves 6 to 8.

Ingredients

For the Pork

 1 cup + 2 Tbs salt

½ cup + 2 Tbs sugar

3 Tbs + 2 tsp liquid smoke

5 lbs boneless pork butt

¼ cup creole mustard

2 Tbs ground black pepper

2 Tbs smoked paprika

1 tsp cayenne pepper

For the BBQ Sauce

1 ½ cups ketchup

¼ cup  molasses

2 Tbs Worcestershire sauce

1 Tbs Louisiana hot sauce

½ tsp kosher salt

½ tsp black pepper, fresh ground

Method

For the Pork 

  1. Deeply score pork 5-6 time to allow brine to penetrate.
  2. Dissolve 1 cup salt, 1/2 cup sugar, and 3 Tbs liquid smoke in 4 quarts cold water in large container. Submerge pork in brine and refrigerate for 2-3 hours.
  3. While pork brines, combine mustard and remaining 2 tsp liquid smoke in small bowl; set aside. Combine black pepper, paprika, remaining 2 Tbs sugar, remaining 2 tsp salt, and cayenne in second small bowl; set aside. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees.
  4. Remove pork from brine and dry thoroughly with paper towels. Rub mustard mixture over entire surface of of pork. Sprinkle entire surface of each piece with spice mixture. Place pork on wire rack set inside foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Place piece of parchment paper over pork, then cover with sheet of aluminum foil, sealing edges to prevent moisture from escaping. Roast pork for 3 hours.
  5. Remove pork from oven; remove and discard foil and parchment. Carefully pour off liquid in bottom of baking sheet. Remove fat from liquid and reserve for sauce. Return pork to oven and cook, uncovered, until well browned, tender, and internal temperature registers 200 degrees on instant-read thermometer, about 1½ hours. Transfer pork to serving dish, and let rest for 20 minutes.
  6. FOR THE SAUCE: While pork rests, pour 1/2 cup of defatted cooking liquid into medium bowl; whisk in sauce ingredients.
  7. TO SERVE: Using 2 forks, shred pork into bite-sized pieces. Toss with 1 cup sauce and season with salt and pepper. 

Serve, passing remaining sauce separately.



Product Talk: Yogurt the Greek way


Greek-style yogurt has really exploded in popularity over the last couple of years, as more brands have hit the market and popular U.S. yogurt makers like Dannon and Yoplait have started making it, too. So what’s the big deal? It’s just yogurt, right? 

Well, yes and no. Like the standard American-style yogurt you probably already eat,  Greek yogurt is a fermented milk-based product. Both types are good sources of probiotics, healthy bacteria which is thought to help the digestive system. 

But Greek yogurt is thicker, creamier, and richer-tasting than most other forms of yogurt, and it can be healthier for you too. 

Greek yogurt is traditionally made by straining regular yogurt. This allows whey and liquid to filter out of the yogurt. So, Greek-style yogurt is not just creamier, it’s also more concentrated than traditional yogurts you may be used to eating. 

Partially because it’s more concentrated, Greek-style yogurts have about two times as much protein as regular yogurt. Some varieties have as much as 20 grams of protein per serving – that’s almost half the recommended daily allowance for an adult woman. It’s also lower in carbohydrates and lactose than other types of yogurt. So, if you’re diabetic, watching your weight, or lactose-sensitive, Greek yogurt may be a better choice for you. 

Many fans, however, like it just for the flavor. You can buy it sweetened with fruit or flavorings, or plain. Some varieties have fat; others don’t. But even if you buy low-fat or no-fat versions, Greek yogurt tastes as rich as sour cream. You can serve it the same way you use regular yogurt – plain or with fruit or granola, blended into a smoothie, or as a dressing for fruit salad. 

But this yogurt’s creaminess also makes it great for baking and cooking, because it doesn’t separate. (Just substitute it for buttermilk or sour cream in recipes.) Or, basically, you can substitute plain Greek-style yogurt for anything you might normally use sour cream for. Use it to top baked potatoes or try it in your favorite dip and salad recipes. Finally, you can even use it as a substitute for mayonnaise; try it instead of mayo in your favorite tuna, chicken or potato salad recipe. 

Look for Greek yogurt, by popular makers Dannon, Yoplait and Athenos, all in the dairy section of your neighborhood Brookshire’s, right next to the traditional yogurt.  



Product Talk: Catfish-Beyond the fryer


If, like most of us, you’re trying to eat more healthily, you probably know you should be eating more fish. 

Personally, I love just about every kind of seafood, cooked almost any way. But I know  many people who think they only like fried fish, or that they don’t really like fish at all.  So I always like to recommend a widely available fish that almost everybody knows and likes: Catfish. 

Sure, you probably grew up thinking the only way to eat it was fried, preferably with hush puppies on the side. But today’s farm-raised catfish is so mild and meaty, it tastes great prepared many ways – grilled, baked, sautéed, poached or just popped under the broiler for a few minutes. And because catfish is so mild, it pairs well with a strongly flavored sauce or lots of herbs, especially dried or fresh dill or spicy, Cajun-style seasonings. 

And, if you don’t fry it, catfish is a really good choice for a low-fat, heart-healthy diet. It’s sometimes overlooked because, compared to fattier fish like salmon and mackerel, catfish does not contain as much of the omega-3 fatty acids that are associated with good heart health. However, catfish is relatively low in total fat and saturated fat, and high in protein. And it also has more omega-3s than a comparable serving of hamburger, steak, or chicken. 

One more thing – catfish is a relatively sustainable fish. That means, unlike some species that are being overfished in the world’s oceans, lakes and rivers, catfish are responsibly raised by farmers in fresh-water ponds. U.S.-raised catfish, like you’ll find at Brookshire’s, are fed high-quality grain that contribute to their mild flavor. Catfish sold at Brookshire’s come from a plant in Hughes Springs, Texas, which has attained Best Aquaculture Practices certification. 

Because they are farmed, not wild-caught, catfish filets have always tended to be more reasonably priced than many other forms of seafood. However, over the past several months, you may have noticed higher prices for catfish. That’s because as more corn has gone into ethanol production, catfish feed prices have risen sharply, causing some catfish farmers to turn to other ventures. That’s created a catfish shortage. However, I’m happy to report that the shortage is easing up; you may already be seeing lower prices. 

If you’d like to move beyond the deep-fryer, this easy grilled catfish dish is a great one to start with. The dill sauce adds lots of flavor, but because it calls for low-fat dressing, not a ton of fat. The filets will cook in only about ten minutes.  If you’re uncomfortable putting fish on the grill, you can prepare this recipe according to instructions but then bake it in a 350-degree oven for about 7-10 minutes, or until fish is just starting to flake. (Thinner filets will need slightly less time; thicker pieces will need the maximum.)

http://brookshires.mywebgrocer.com/RecipeDetails.aspx?Pos=0&Search=catfish&SRC2=0&RecipeID=1841&cc=1&s=157366646&g=bea86b31-3622-4957-8ed3-6233a61f4b33&uc=DC97B



Product Talk: Baked Goodies for Special Diets


The problem with many bakery products produced for those on special diets – whether sugar-free or gluten-free – is that it’s often all too easy to taste what’s missing. The sugar, for one. Or the wheat flour that gives cakes and muffins their moist, delicate texture.

That’s why I’m so proud of the Tasty Bakery line of specialty loaf cakes, muffins and cakes that we introduced recently. Having tried them all, I can say these are so good, you’d be happy eating them even if you don’t have dietary concerns.

But for the growing number of people who have food sensitivities, allergies, or a need to cut down on their sugar intake, these goodies are an especially great find.

Take the no-sugar-added cookies, cakes and muffins. Fruit nectar, not artificial sweeteners, creates the sweet taste of goodies like blueberry muffins, apple loaf cake and oatmeal raisin cookie. Fruit nectar doesn’t deliver the “aftertaste” or off-taste you may have experienced eating some other no-sugar-added goods. And they are still lower in fat, calories and carbs than traditional recipes.

The sugar-free baked goods, like the loaf cake, are sweetened with lacticol, an ingredient made from milk sugar lactose. Lactitol does not raise blood glucose or insulin levels, so it’s considered a good sweetening alternative for diabetics. In addition, you may find lactitol easier to digest than other sugar-free sweeteners, which in some people cause stomach discomfort.

And the gluten-free items – like chocolate chip cookies, wild blueberry muffins and peanut butter cookies – are made without wheat or other gluten-containing ingredients, like malt flavoring or modified food starch with a wheat source. They are baked in a dedicated facility, so there’s no contamination by these allergens. However, again, if you didn’t know they didn’t contain wheat, you might not guess.

The Tasty Bakery line is also certified kosher. The last piece of good news? They come packaged in cute little gift boxes that make them a great take-along hostess gift or party offering. Or, of course, just a little present to yourself and your family.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Product Talk: Organic Milk


Most of us have some sort of milk ritual. It could be your breakfast is incomplete if not accompanied by a cold, creamy glass of milk, or your mother’s warm chocolate chip cookies are not the same without milk to dunk them in. From as far back as I can remember, before bed, my grandfather would get the same cup out of the cabinet and pour himself a glass of milk. For at least 22 years I don’t believe that man went a night without a cold glass of milk. 

Unlike my grandfather, I don’t consume milk every night, but I always seem to need it for a recipe. My biggest problem with milk is that it seems to be out of date every time I open my refrigerator door. I always get frustrated that I have to pour so much milk down the drain. Lately, I have been buying organic milk for more than the reason of it being organic. If you notice organic milk tends to have a longer expiration date. For that reason, you can justify paying a little more for organic milk. 

If you’re curious why organic milk is different than regular cow’s milk, here’s why: The USDA has a program, called the National Organic Program, which has set up guidelines on what can be labeled organic. This way you can’t just slap the word organic on just any product. Organic milk is milk that comes from cows that have not been injected with antibiotics or a hormone that will increase their production of milk. The next guideline is the food the cows eat must not be treated with any pesticides. Lastly, the cows must have some kind of access to a pasture or outdoors. 

Now you know what the pros are to buying organic milk! 

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS