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Healthy Living: Vacations and Vaccinations


It’s that time of year again! School is almost finished, and a much-needed summer vacation is calling your name.  

You’ve already started planning for that fantastic getaway, and it seems like you’ve got everything set. You’ve booked your hotel and made all of your travel reservations. You’re so ready to escape your routine that you are already starting to relax. But wait. Are you really ready? 

Each year, thousands of Americans travel abroad for their summer vacations, but by traveling to different countries, vacationers are exposed to many risks not present in the United States.  Being prepared to handle those risks is very crucial, and Brookshire’s offers a helping hand.   

The pharmacy at FRESH by Brookshire’s and the Brookshire’s Pharmacy on Roseland Blvd. in Tyler, Texas, offer travel immunizations to help protect our customers from diseases or infections they could contract on their journey abroad.

It is important to be prepared and plan ahead. Ask your pharmacist or physician for any preparations that need to be done, and get your vaccinations done at least eight weeks before your departure. Remember, vacations should be a time of fun and adventure so let the pharmacy at FRESH by Brookshire’s or the Brookshire’s Pharmacy on Roseland Blvd. help protect you and your loved ones from any threat of sickness this vacation season. 

Your friendly neighborhood pharmacist,

Dr. Charlotte Weller



Healthy Living: Spring Allergies


Spring has sprung and so has allergy season!  Unfortunately this beautiful time of year is also the time for runny noses, watery eyes and lots of sneezing. But your allergies don’t have to keep you from enjoying your daily life. Follow these helpful tips to help fight off your spring allergies and enjoy the great outdoors!

Keep pollen under control- Pollen is easily tracked inside your home, so it’s a good idea to wash your bed’s sheets weekly in hot water. And after a long day of working in the yard or spending family time outside, take a shower and wash your hair as soon as you come inside. 

Keep your indoor air free from the outdoors- It is tempting to open all the windows in my house on these gorgeous spring days, but for allergy sufferers, it’s best to keep all the windows closed during pollen season. Spring breezes carry pollen through the air…and the cleaner you keep your air, the clearer your eyes! 

Talk to our pharmacists about taking allergy medicine- You don’t have to suffer through spring. There are lots of remedies and reliefs available now – from over-the-counter nasal saline rinses to antihistamines and decongestants. It can be confusing to decide which allergy medication is best for you or your children, so you are always welcome to stop by one of our Brookshire’s pharmacies to talk with one of our pharmacists and find just what you need. 

Don’t let allergies take you away from enjoying your favorite springtime outdoor activities. By following a few easy steps, you can say goodbye to your sneezes and watery eyes and welcome this beautiful season with open arms!



Healthy Living: Allergy & Asthma


April showers bring May flowers, and what do May flowers bring? Not pilgrims, but sneezes, teary eyes, itching, and other forms of allergenic reactions from those beautiful May flowers. Even those with extrinsic asthma may experience more reactions from the increased pollen in the air.

Brookshire’s is here to help treat your allergenic or asthmatic needs. Through a wide variety of medicines, a friendly pharmacy and providing you with knowledge, we are here to help treat your pesky allergy symptoms.

Those with asthma usually suffer from two types: extrinsic or intrinsic. Whatever your triggers may be asthma can cause your airways to become inflamed and constricted. At Brookshire’s Pharmacy we are eager to meet your medicinal needs, and help provide you with your asthma medicine in a timely fashion so that you can stay happy, healthy, and breathing.

Most individuals who live in East Texas experience some form of allergy problems at some point throughout the year. Whether it is pollen, mold, or even pet dander, allergies can run a person down. Stuffy noses, sinus headaches, and watery eyes can be aggravating and distracting. At Brookshire’s, let our staff help you find convenient and affordable ways to treat and prevent your symptoms.

So don’t let your allergies or asthma become a burden. Instead, drop by your local Brookshire’s where we will work to not only help treat your symptoms, but try to make it where you can enjoy those May flowers too. 

Your friendly neighborhood pharmacist,

Dr. Charlotte Weller



Healthy Living: Avoiding the Recalls


As of late, drug recalls have seemed to be running rampant from familiar, traditional brands such as Johnson & Johnson to common household items such as McNeil’s Tylenol or Sudafed. In the midst of these recalls, it’s hard to know whether you’ve purchased a recalled item, or what brand names you can trust. Thankfully, Brookshire’s has provided a simple solution to the problems caused by the unsettling recalls.

Top-Care. 

Top-Care is Brookshire’s own brand of health care products that are closely monitored and haven’t been affected by the recalls. Supplying a vast array of medicines and other personal needs, Top-Care offers an easy alternative. Whether you’ve got a stubborn headache or allergies are getting you down, Top-Care has a variety of generics that are affordable, convenient, and most importantly, effective.

So avoid the recall issue altogether, and let Brookshire’s find a way to make your shopping more convenient and enjoyable.

Your friendly neighborhood pharmacist,

Dr. Charlotte Weller 



Family Matters : What To Take On a Walk With Your Dog


When the weather is warm and the sun is shining, I enjoy spending as much time as possible outdoors. One outdoor activity that I enjoy is walking my dog.  If you’re taking your dog on a walk, ASPCA suggests bringing along water and treats.  It’s not only important to keep yourself hydrated while being outdoors, but also keeping your dog hydrated. 

I always carry a jar of water and a plastic bowl with me when taking my dog on a walk. Periodically, my dog and I will stop for a brief water break to help hydrate ourselves. Another item to bring is your dog’s favorite treats. You never know when the perfect training opportunity will arise and it’s important to have treats to reward your dog for good behavior.

 



50% of Flu Cases Are in February


Still debating on whether or not you should get your seasonal flu shot? At your local participating Brookshire’s pharmacies it’s not too late. Nearly 50% of all flu cases occur in February. The timing and duration of flu season can vary. Even though flu outbreaks can happen as early as October, the influenza activity usually peaks in January or later. Well it’s February and Brookshire’s is geared up to help you fight the flu. Through the month of February at participating pharmacies with a new or transferred prescription you will receive a FREE flu shot. Transfers are very easy! Just give us a call or come by the pharmacy with your prescription information and leave the rest up to us! Don’t have a new or transferred prescription? Stop by any participating Brookshire’s pharmacy and get a flu shot for only $ 14.00. Visit www.brookshires.com to get a full list of participating pharmacies. Offer valid only for customers of the age 7 and up, hurry in offer ends February 28, 2011.  

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Healthy Living: Influenza


Although influenza activity has been relatively low in 2010, the CDC is reminding Americans it is expected to increase as we move into the winter months. It has been reported that there is a sharp increase in influenza-like illness reported in the southeast United States, particularly in Georgia. 

CDC said influenza B strain is the main culprit of the activity in Georgia and is primarily occurring in school-aged children. The agency also indicated that current evidence suggests that this season’s vaccine is a good match for the three influenza virus strains (2009 H1N1A virus, influenza A H3N2 and influenza B) primarily seen thus far. 

Although most people recover from the flu with no problems, over 200,000 Americans are hospitalized each year with the illness and as many as 36,000 die.  

With that being said, What is the different between the cold and flu? 

The common cold and the flu are both respiratory illnesses with similar symptoms.  The main difference between the common cold and the flu is the severity of the symptoms.   

Common cold symptoms:
• Gradually get worse over a few days.
• Are more likely to include runny or stuffy nose than the flu.
• Often include a sore throat, while flu rarely does.
• May cause tiredness, but it is much less severe than what is experienced with the flu.
• Generally do not result in serious health problems and hospitalizations.

Flu symptoms generally:
• Come on quickly and are more severe.
• Include fever (which can last 3 to 4 days and is generally higher than the low grade fever that may accompany a cold.)
• Include body aches, extreme tiredness, weakness, fatigue, headache, and dry cough.

The flu can result in serious health complications including bronchitis, and pneumonia. 

What is the treatment? 

Cold

Depending on your symptoms and your health, you may have several options for cold and flu treatments.  A cold does not usually require a visit to the doctor.  You can do a lot to take care of yourself and your family at home.  While there is no cure for the common cold, taking over-the-counter medications to ease the symptoms, getting extra rest, and taking care of your self is essential.  Some good old chicken soup is not a bad idea either! 

Flu

The best way to treat the flu, of course, is to prevent it.  Getting a flu shot every year will greatly reduce your risk of getting the flu. Flu shots are available at many Brookshire/Super 1 pharmacies.  Ask your pharmacist for details.   

Once you have the flu, early detection is critical.  If you realize or suspect that you have the flu within 48 hours of the start of symptoms, you could suffer a lot less.  Taking Tamiflu or another antiviral medication may help shorten the duration or reduce the symptoms of the flu.  Taking over-the-counter medications, getting extra rest, and some good old chicken soup, are also other ways to help make you more comfortable.

Since the common cold and the flu are both caused by viruses, antibiotics will not help.  Plus, taking antibiotics when you have a virus may do more harm than good. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk of getting an infection later that resists antibiotic treatment. 

Hopefully these tips will help if you find yourself feeling “under the weather.”  Don’t’ forget frequent hand washing is one of the most effective ways to stop germs from spreading from one person to another.  Also remember, “An apple a day, keeps the doctor away!” 



Healthy Living: How to Live with Diabetes


November is Diabetes Awareness Month, here are some helpful tips on how to live right and stay healthy while living with Diabetes. 

SELF-TESTING-

If you have diabetes, your doctor may tell you to regularly check your blood sugar levels at home. There are a number of devices available, and they use only a drop of blood. Self-monitoring tells you how well diet, medication, and exercise are working together to control your diabetes. It can help your doctor prevent complications.

The American Diabetes Association recommends keeping blood sugar levels in the range of:

  • 80 – 120 mg/dL before meals
  • 100 – 140 mg/dL at bedtime

Your doctor may adjust this depending on your circumstances. 

WHAT TO EAT-

You should work closely with your health care provider to learn how much fat, protein, and carbohydrates you need in your diet. A registered dietician can help you plan your dietary needs.

People with type 1 diabetes should eat at about the same times each day and try to be consistent with the types of food they choose. This helps to prevent blood sugar from becoming extremely high or low.

People with type 2 diabetes should follow a well-balanced and low-fat diet. 

HOW TO TAKE MEDICATION-

Medications to treat diabetes include insulin and glucose-lowering pills called oral hypoglycemic drugs.

People with type 1 diabetes cannot make their own insulin. They need daily insulin injections. Insulin does not come in pill form. Injections are generally needed one to four times per day. Some people use an insulin pump. It is worn at all times and delivers a steady flow of insulin throughout the day. Other people may use inhaled insulin. See also: Type 1 diabetes

Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes may respond to treatment with exercise, diet, and medicines taken by mouth. There are several types of medicines used to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetes. See also: Type 2 diabetes.Medications may be switched to insulin during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Gestational diabetes may be treated with exercise and changes in diet. 

EXERCISE-

Regular exercise is especially important for people with diabetes. It helps with blood sugar control, weight loss, and high blood pressure. People with diabetes who exercise are less likely to experience a heart attack or stroke than those who do not exercise regularly.

Here are some exercise considerations:

  • Always check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program.
  • Ask your doctor or nurse if you have the right footwear.
  • Choose an enjoyable physical activity that is appropriate for your current fitness level.
  • Exercise every day, and at the same time of day, if possible.
  • Monitor blood glucose levels before and after exercise.
  • Carry food that contains a fast-acting carbohydrate in case you become hypoglycemic during or after exercise.
  • Carry a diabetes identification card and a cell phone in case of emergency.
  • Drink extra fluids that do not contain sugar before, during, and after exercise.

You may need to change your diet or medication dose if you change your exercise intensity or duration to keep blood sugar levels from going too high or low. 

FOOT CARE-

People with diabetes are more likely to have foot problems. Diabetes can damage blood vessels and nerves and decrease the body’s ability to fight infection. You may not notice a foot injury until an infection develops. Death of skin and other tissue can occur.

If left untreated, the affected foot may need to be amputated. Diabetes is the most common condition leading to amputations.

To prevent injury to the feet, check and care for your feet every day.



Healthy Living: Routine


As a diabetic, it is important to have a routine. With a routine you will begin eat, take your medication, and exercise about the same time everyday. Eating and taking your medication about the same time everyday will help prevent you from skipping a meal or forgetting to take your medication. Find a good time of the day to eat, exercise, and take your medication.



Healthy Living: The Flu


It’s that time again, that’s right it’s flu season. Be prepared to fight the flu bug before it bites you. Here are some helpful tips to help you fight the three letter word we all fear F.L.U. 

Take time to get a flu vaccine.

CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. 
While there are many different flu viruses, the flu vaccine protects against the three viruses that research suggests will be most common. 
The 2010-2011 flu vaccine will protect against an influenza A H3N2 virus, an influenza B virus and the 2009 H1N1 virus that caused so much illness last season. 
Everyone 6 months of age and older should get vaccinated against the flu as soon as the 2010-2011 season vaccine is available. 
People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older. 
Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness. 
Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to high risk people. 
Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for them should be vaccinated instead.
Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.
 Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. 
• Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.* 
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way. 
• Try to avoid close contact with sick people. 
• If you are sick with flu–like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.) 
• While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.
• If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can treat your illness. 
• Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter. 
• Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. 
• It’s very important that antiviral drugs be used early (within the first 2 days of symptoms) to treat people who are very sick (such as those who are hospitalized) or people who are sick with flu symptoms and who are at increased risk of severe flu illness, such as pregnant women, young children, people 65 and older and people with certain chronic health conditions. 
• Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. 
Let us help you beat flu season, contact your local Brookshire’s Pharmacy for your vaccination services. 
It’s that time again, that’s right it’s flu season. Be prepared to fight the flu bug before it bites you. Here are some helpful tips to help you fight the three letter word we all fear F.L.U. 

Take time to get a flu vaccine.

  CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. • While there are many different flu viruses, the flu vaccine protects against the three viruses that research suggests will be most common. • The 2010-2011 flu vaccine will protect against an influenza A H3N2 virus, an influenza B virus and the 2009 H1N1 virus that caused so much illness last season. • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get vaccinated against the flu as soon as the 2010-2011 season vaccine is available. • People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older. • Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness. • Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to high risk people. • Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for them should be vaccinated instead. 

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.* • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way. • Try to avoid close contact with sick people. • If you are sick with flu–like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.) • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them. 

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can treat your illness. • Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter. • Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. • It’s very important that antiviral drugs be used early (within the first 2 days of symptoms) to treat people who are very sick (such as those who are hospitalized) or people who are sick with flu symptoms and who are at increased risk of severe flu illness, such as pregnant women, young children, people 65 and older and people with certain chronic health conditions. • Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. 

Let us help you beat flu season, contact your local Brookshire’s Pharmacy for your vaccination services.



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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