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Dine-In: German Beef Rolls


A lot of people think that German food is just schnitzel, sausage and beer.  But there’s so much more to it than that. Today, I’m sharing one of my favorite German dishes, beef rouladen

Rouladen is a very traditional dish of thinly sliced beef, rolled around a filling of bacon, onions, pickles and hearty German mustard, and slowly braised until it is tender. After the beef is cooked, you make a nice thick gravy, and serve that over the rouladen. 

Because it uses inexpensive cuts of beef, this was originally a workingman’s dish. But now, it is popular throughout Germany, and in fact, you usually see it at holidays, festivals or in restaurants. Over there, beer or wine is often added to the beef stock to bring out a richer flavor. 

To make it really traditional, you should serve it with cooked red cabbage and either spatzle (a type of German egg noodle), potato dumplings, or boiled potatoes. But it is also good with mashed potatoes and roasted winter vegetables, like squash, Brussels sprouts or carrots. 

Rouladen

Serves 6 

Ingredients:
1 1/2 lbs. flank steak
1/2 lb. thick-sliced bacon
2 large onions, sliced
10 German pickles (Gundelsheim is the best) sliced lengthwise
2 tablespoons butter
2 1/2 cups beef broth
1/2 cup German mustard
2 tsp corn starch 

Directions:
Cut the flank steak into thin filets; about 1/4” thick and 3 inches wide. 

Generously spread one side of each filet with mustard to taste. Place bacon, onions and pickle slices on each filet and form into a roll. Use string or toothpicks to hold the roll together. 

Heat a skillet over medium heat and melt butter. Place the rolls in the butter and sauté until browned. 

Once browned, pour broth over rolls, cover and simmer for an hour or until tender. When beef is tender, remove from skillet and keep warm. 

Place corn starch in small mixing bowl and add enough water to make a slurry. Be sure to dissolve corn starch well for a smooth sauce. Add this mixture to the skillet and bring to boil. Once sauce is thickened, return rouladen to pan, cover with sauce and serve.



Shop the sale: Ribs, ribs, ribs


The secret to great ribs is time. You have to let the ribs marinate in the sauce, so they absorb deep flavor, and you have to be patient cooking them, a long time at a lower temperature, so they get fall-off-the-bone tender.

Especially this time of year, the easiest way to cook them is in the oven. Even if you’re a rib purist, and think you can’t make ribs without putting them in the smoker, I think you’ll like this recipe, and the ease of this technique. It requires very little work once you put them in the oven, produces a nice tender rib, and gets a wonderful spicy/smoky flavor from the chipotles.

Any of the three types of ribs on sale this week at Brookshire’s – St. Louis-style pork ribs, medium pork spareribs, or pork baby back ribs- would work in this recipe, but I’d probably pick the St. Louis-style ribs. “St. Louis-style” ribs just means that the tips, which can be gristly anyway, have been cut away, leaving a nice, flat, rectangular slab that will fit nicely in a roasting pan.

Oven BBQ’d Ribs

Serves 8

Ingredient:
2 tablespoons  vegetable oil
1/2  yellow onion, chopped fine
2 cloves  garlic, minced
1 3/4 cups  ketchup
3/4 cup chipotles, canned
1 cup   molasses
1/3 cup  sugar
8-10 pounds ribs (about two St. Louis style rib racks, each cut in half, or about four baby-back rib racks)
Kosher salt, to taste

Directions:

Heat the oil in medium saucepan on medium-high, and add the onion and garlic. Sauté until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the rest of the ingredients, except the ribs; turn heat to low, and simmer uncovered for 25 minutes. Cool to room temperature.

Put the ribs and the sauce in a large plastic sealable bag, and refrigerate overnight.

Preheat oven to 300°F. Remove ribs from bag and reserve liquid and set aside. Season ribs with salt. Arrange the ribs on a foil-lined baking sheet and cover tightly with foil. Bake for 2 1/2 hours. Meanwhile, bring the barbecue sauce to a boil in a pot on the stove. Boil for 3 minutes, and set aside.

Uncover the ribs, turn them over, and bake an additional 30 minutes. Brush with barbecue sauce on both sides, and serve hot.



Dine-In: Chicken Cacciatore


Chicken cacciatore is a fancy name for what’s really a pretty simple dish – braised chicken, Italian style. 

The name comes from the Italian phrase for “hunter’s style,” which in culinary terms usually means “with mushrooms,”  but in this case also means cooked with tomatoes and wine. Chicken cacciatore was a popular dish in the ‘60s and ‘70s, and you can still find it in some old-school Italian restaurants, but for the most part it is one of those dishes you just don’t see much anymore. 

I don’t really understand that, because it’s actually a very solid dish, easy to make but full of flavor. Serve it over pasta, or with some warm, crusty bread, and you have a hearty dinner for a cool evening. 

I prefer using thigh meat, because I think the dark meat is moister and more flavorful, but if you like white meat better, you can substitute an equivalent amount of bone-in chicken breasts, probably about one package of four breasts, depending on the size. Do not use boneless, skinless breasts unless that’s all you have; cooking the chicken with the bones and skin adds a much richer flavor. 

In all, this is a pretty classic recipe, including the use of red wine. If you are not used to cooking with wine, be aware that the alcohol evaporates during the cooking. If you prefer not to use it, perhaps because of allergies to the sulfites in red wine, you can substitute additional chicken stock, but the finished dish will not have quite the depth of flavor as the original recipe. 

Chicken Cacciatore with Mushrooms and Herbs 

Serves 4 

Ingredients:
8 bone-in chicken thighs (about 3 pounds), trimmed of excess fat
1 tsp. teaspoon olive oil 
1 medium onion, chopped
3 portobello mushroom caps, wiped clean and cut into 3/4-inch cubes
4 medium cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 tbls.unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/2  cups dry red wine
1/2 cup chicken stock or low-sodium canned chicken broth
1 can diced tomatoes (14 1/2 ounces), drained
2 tsp. fresh thyme leaves, minced
1 piece Parmesan cheese rind (2 inches, about 1 ounce), optional
2 tsp. fresh sage leaves, minced 

Directions:
1. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 2 minutes. Add four chicken thighs, skin-side down, and cook, not moving them until skin is crisp and well browned, about 5 minutes; using tongs, flip chicken and brown on second side, about 5 minutes longer. Transfer browned chicken to large plate; brown remaining chicken thighs, transfer to plate, and set aside. 

2. Drain off all but 1 tablespoon fat from pot. Add onion, mushrooms, and 1/2 teaspoon salt; sauté over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until moisture evaporates and vegetables begin to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile, remove and discard skin from browned chicken thighs. Add garlic to pot and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in flour and cook, stirring constantly, about 1 minute. Add wine, scraping pot bottom with wooden spoon to loosen brown bits. Stir in stock, tomatoes, thyme, cheese rind (if using), 1/2 teaspoon salt (omit salt if using cheese rind), and pepper to taste. Submerge chicken pieces in liquid and bring to boil; cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer until chicken is tender and cooked through, about 45 minutes, turning chicken pieces with tongs halfway through cooking. Discard cheese rind, stir in sage, adjust seasonings with salt and pepper, and serve. 

If your Dutch oven is large enough to hold all the chicken pieces in a single layer without crowding, brown all the pieces at once instead of in batches. The Parmesan cheese rind is optional, but it is recommended for the robust, savory flavor it adds to the dish. An equal amount of minced fresh rosemary can be substituted for the sage.



Chicken with Pomegranate


Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes

Serves: 8 

Ingredients:

2 Tbs Food Club Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1/2 tsp Food Club Salt, or to taste
1/2 tsp Food Club Ground Black
Pepper, or to taste
1 3/4 cups chicken stock
1 small yellow onion, julienne
1 poblano pepper, julienne
1 tsp ground cumin
2 cups Greek yogurt
2 Tbs Food Club All-Purpose Flour
1 pomegranate, seeds removed and separated
1 Tbs cilantro, roughly chopped 

Directions:

Heat oil in a saucepan. Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper. Add chicken and chicken stock to skillet; brown chicken on both sides. Once chicken
is nicely browned, remove from pan. 

Add onions and poblano pepper to pan; cook until golden. Stir in the cumin; cook for 1 minute. Cover and cook, on low heat, for 10 minutes. The liquid
will reduce slightly. 

Mix yogurt with flour. Add yogurt to saucepan; mix well. Gently heat throughout.  Remove from heat and add pomegranate seeds and cilantro to sauce. Drizzle sauce over chicken. 

Nutritional Information:  Calories Per Serving: 343, Fat: 10 g (2 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 146 mg, Sodium: 443 mg, Carbohydrates: 6 g, Fiber: 0 g, Protein: 54 g.  



Tex-Mex cheese steak nachos


Ingredients:
1 Tbs vegetable oil
1 cup chopped poblano pepper
1 cup chopped white onion
6 oz sirloin, flank steak or rib eye, sliced into strips and then cut into bites
1 jar Leigh Oliver’s White Queso, any flavor
Salt and pepper
1 can refried beans or refried black beans
6 oz tortilla chips 

Garnish: sour cream, chopped tomato, guacamole, chopped onion, jalapeño

Directions:
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add peppers and onions
and sauté for about 4 minutes, until tender. Remove peppers and onions from
skillet and set aside. Sprinkle sirloin with salt and pepper. Add to skillet and cook
over medium-high heat until brown, but still medium-rare, about 4 minutes.
Remove from heat. Heat refried beans in microwave until warmed throughout,
about 2 minutes, stirring once. 

Arrange chips on serving platter and top each with a dollop of refried beans and a slice of sirloin. Drizzle with Leigh Oliver’s White Queso and garnish as desired. Serve immediately.



Healthy Living: Healthy Lunches


It’s that time of year again, summer is ending and school is just around the corner. Parents prepare their children for the start of the school year by purchasing new school uniforms, new school supplies, and helping to finish all the school summer projects. What parents may fail to adequately prepare is healthy school lunches. As you prepare your child for the school year, do not neglect their nutrition. A healthy mind stems from a healthy body and a healthy diet. 

A healthy diet includes all three nutrient classes: carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. All three nutrients make the body healthy and strong. A proper diet is essential in children, as they need these nutrients in order to grow strong, both physically and mentally. A carbohydrate is the body’s energy source. Good carbohydrates to include in your child’s lunch are: fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread products, and low-fat dairy products. Try to avoid empty, unhealthy carbohydrates, such as: chips, cookies, crackers, and sweets. Protein is important in normal growth and development. It helps children develop strong muscles. Good protein sources include: beans, nuts, turkey, ham, and peanut butter. Lastly, healthy fats are important in your child’s development. Healthy fats include: salad dressings, such as Italian dressing and low-fat Ranch dressing as a nice side to dip their carrots or celery in. 

Just because your child needs a healthy lunch, does not mean it needs to be boring. A few tips to encourage your child to eat their healthy lunch include:

  1. Include a low-fat dip, such as peanut butter or low-fat ranch with the vegetables (carrots, celery) so that your kids enjoy the taste more.
  2. Instead of a sweet dessert, include a low-fat yogurt, Jell-O, or fruit choice, as these are sweet and healthy substitutes.
  3. Instead of including regular potato chips, use baked chips or pretzels as a healthier alternative.
  4. When preparing sandwiches, use whole-grain bread instead of white bread. Go easy on the mayonnaise.
  5. As for drinks, include low-fat milk or water frequently. Use juice or soda sparingly. These are full of sugar and empty calories.           


Product Talk: Pork Butt


The cut of pork known as pork butt doesn’t get much as much respect as trendier, leaner, and fancier  cuts like pork tenderloin.

But I really prefer pork butt for many dishes, especially pulled pork sandwiches and tacos. Think of it as the pork version of pot roast. Because it’s got better marbling and higher fat content, it stays moist and cooks up tender, especially if you use a slow-cooking method like a crockpot. (Pork loin and pork tenderloin are both easy to overcook, giving you a dried-out, tough piece of meat.)

Pork butt also has a deeper, richer, meatier flavor than some of those other “white-meat” pork cuts.  And it absorbs flavor nicely during cooking, without a lot of work. If you’re cooking in the oven or a crockpot, for instance, you can just coat the meat with a dry rub before cooking. Or to create the Mexican dish known as carnitas, great in tacos, cook with chiles and orange juice, or another citrus.

Plus, did I mention it’s affordable, often just about half the price of leaner cuts?

This recipe makes a great weekend supper, and makes enough that you can invite a few friends. If you’re short on time, you can use your favorite prepared barbecue sauce instead of putting together homemade.

Oven Pulled Pork with Homemade BBQ Sauce

Serves 6 to 8.

Ingredients

For the Pork

 1 cup + 2 Tbs salt

½ cup + 2 Tbs sugar

3 Tbs + 2 tsp liquid smoke

5 lbs boneless pork butt

¼ cup creole mustard

2 Tbs ground black pepper

2 Tbs smoked paprika

1 tsp cayenne pepper

For the BBQ Sauce

1 ½ cups ketchup

¼ cup  molasses

2 Tbs Worcestershire sauce

1 Tbs Louisiana hot sauce

½ tsp kosher salt

½ tsp black pepper, fresh ground

Method

For the Pork 

  1. Deeply score pork 5-6 time to allow brine to penetrate.
  2. Dissolve 1 cup salt, 1/2 cup sugar, and 3 Tbs liquid smoke in 4 quarts cold water in large container. Submerge pork in brine and refrigerate for 2-3 hours.
  3. While pork brines, combine mustard and remaining 2 tsp liquid smoke in small bowl; set aside. Combine black pepper, paprika, remaining 2 Tbs sugar, remaining 2 tsp salt, and cayenne in second small bowl; set aside. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees.
  4. Remove pork from brine and dry thoroughly with paper towels. Rub mustard mixture over entire surface of of pork. Sprinkle entire surface of each piece with spice mixture. Place pork on wire rack set inside foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Place piece of parchment paper over pork, then cover with sheet of aluminum foil, sealing edges to prevent moisture from escaping. Roast pork for 3 hours.
  5. Remove pork from oven; remove and discard foil and parchment. Carefully pour off liquid in bottom of baking sheet. Remove fat from liquid and reserve for sauce. Return pork to oven and cook, uncovered, until well browned, tender, and internal temperature registers 200 degrees on instant-read thermometer, about 1½ hours. Transfer pork to serving dish, and let rest for 20 minutes.
  6. FOR THE SAUCE: While pork rests, pour 1/2 cup of defatted cooking liquid into medium bowl; whisk in sauce ingredients.
  7. TO SERVE: Using 2 forks, shred pork into bite-sized pieces. Toss with 1 cup sauce and season with salt and pepper. 

Serve, passing remaining sauce separately.



Dine In: Well, hot dog!


Nearly every kid loves hot dogs, but a lot of adults do, too. After all, Americans will eat 7 billion hot dogs this summer, so kids can’t be eating all of them! 

July is National Hot Dog month, so it’s a great time to throw some ‘dogs on the grill for an easy summer cookout. (If you’re worried about the fat content, look for all-turkey dogs, or low-fat or non-fat varieties that can have as few as 50 calories each.) 

And how will you dress your dog? The National Hot Dog & Sausage Council, which tracks such things, says mustard is the most popular condiment, followed by ketchup and then chili, with relish and onions far behind. But why not mix it up a bit? Check these ideas for bringing some unusual, gourmet, or regional flavors to your table: 

  • Top with fried onions (like Durkee’s) and spicy mustard.
  • Top with ranch dressing and cooked, crumbled bacon. A more adult alternative: Use blue cheese dressing and crumbled blue cheese along with the bacon!
  • Instead of offering chopped raw onions, grill or sauté slices of onions and red and green bell peppers, similar to the topping you typically get on Italian sausage.
  • Frito-pie dog: Top with chili, grated cheese, and crumbled Fritos.
  • Make it Asian style: Instead of ketchup, use teriyaki sauce; soy sauce; sriracha sauce, a spicy, Asian-inspired chile sauce; or hoisin, a slightly sweet, slightly spicy Chinese-style sauce.
  • Chicago ‘dog: Load it up with yellow mustard, relish, chopped raw onion, tomato slices, celery salt, and serve in a soft poppy seed bun. A dill pickle spear can be stuffed in the bun as well.
  • Kansas City ‘dog: Melted Swiss cheese and warm sauerkraut, stuffed into a sesame-seed bun.
  • Mexico ‘dog: At streetside stalls across Mexico, the hot dog is given star treatment: It’s wrapped in bacon and grilled, then topped with chopped raw onion and tomato; tomatillo (green) salsa; and a squirt of hot sauce, and served in a soft egg bun. You can then add mayonnaise, ketchup and mustard if you please.

This easy topping recipe is billed as a Texas-style ‘dog, thanks to its barbecue sauce and pickle-spiked coleslaw.

http://brookshires.mywebgrocer.com/RecipeDetails.aspx?Pos=0&Search=hot%20dogs&SRC2=0&RecipeID=53616&cc=1&s=158775443&g=3a38de0d-8f21-4a24-b69a-4468a4b3a35c&uc=DC97B 



Dine In: Spicy Thai Beef Salad


Usually, I’m a meat-and-potatoes kind of guy. Serve me a salad for dinner, and I’ll be looking around, wondering where you hid the main course.

This spicy beef salad is an exception to that rule. It’s one of my absolute favorite Thai dishes, combining spicy, sweet and savory flavors, all in each bite.

I’ve had versions with tomatoes, Chinese long beans, bell peppers, and other vegetables added in. But I like to keep it more traditional and simple, both to highlight the great flavors of the ingredients and to keep it quick to make.

Especially in the summer, this salad makes a light and refreshing dinner, but yet it’s hearty enough that you won’t be left asking where’s the beef. When the weather cools down, I might serve this as a first course, maybe with a Thai curry or soup, for an Asian-inspired soup-and-salad dinner.

 

Thai beef salad

Serves 3-4

For the dressing
3 limes, juiced
1 ½ tablespoons fish sauce (found in Asian section of grocery)
1 tablespoon sugar
1 small red onion, roughly chopped
1 jalapeno, roughly chopped

For the salad
1 pound skirt steak
salt and pepper to taste
1 small head butter lettuce, clean and leaves separated
1 medium carrot, julienned
½ cup cucumber, peeled and sliced
¼ cup fresh mint, chopped
½ cup fresh cilantro, chopped

  1. Place dressing ingredients in a food processor and puree until liquid. The dressing should be sweet, sour, salty and spicy. All of these can be adjusted to taste. Set aside. 
  2. Season skirt steak with salt and pepper and grill over high heat. Cook to medium rare. When the meat is done, set aside to rest for a few minutes while you make the salad.
  3. Toss the salad ingredients together in a large bowl.
  4. Slice the steaks across the grain into small bite-size pieces and mix with dressing. Save any of the meat juices and mix with the dressing. Combine with the salad while steak is warm.
  5. Arrange salad on plates and serve.


Texas, Our Texas


Oven Pulled Pork with Homemade BBQ Sauce  

Prep Time: 30 minutes, plus brining
Cook Time: 4 hours

Serves: 8   

 

 

Ingredients: 
Pork:
5 lbs boneless pork butt
1/4 cup creole mustard
2 tsp liquid smoke
2 Tbs Food Club Ground Black Pepper
1/2 tsp Food Club Salt, or to taste
2 Tbs smoked paprika
1 tsp cayenne pepper
2 tsp Food Club Sugar 

BBQ Sauce:
1 1/2 cups Food Club Ketchup
1/4 cup molasses
2 Tbs Food Club Worcestershire Sauce
1 Tbs Louisiana Hot Sauce
1/2 tsp Food Club Salt
1/2 tsp Food Club Black Pepper 

Directions:
Prepare brine for pork with 4 quarts water, 1 cup salt, 1/2 cup sugar and 3 tablespoons liquid smoke. Add pork to brine and refrigerate 2 to 3 hours. In a small bowl combine mustard, liquid smoke, seasonings and sugar; set aside. 

Preheat oven to 325° F. Remove pork from brine and dry with paper towels. Rub mustard mixture over pork. Place pork on wire rack set inside foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Place parchment paper over pork, then cover with sheet of aluminum foil, sealing edges to prevent moisture from escaping. Roast pork for 3 hours. 

Remove pork from oven. Carefully pour off liquid in bottom of baking sheet. Return pork to oven and cook, uncovered, until well browned, tender and internal temperature registers 200° F on instant-read thermometer, about 1 1/2 hours. 

Transfer pork to serving dish and let rest for 20 minutes. In a medium bowl whisk together sauce ingredients. Shred pork and toss with 1 cup BBQ sauce. Serve pulled pork on hamburger bun with coleslaw. 

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 242, Fat: 6 g (0 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 101 mg, Carbohydrates: 33 g, Fiber: 0 g, Protein: 18 g.



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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