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Rubbed the right way!


Savory Chicken Rub
1/3 cup salt
1/4 cup black pepper
1/4 cup garlic powder
1/4 cup dry mustard
2 Tbs paprika
1 Tbs thyme

Seafood Rub
1/4 cup Old Bay or other seafood seasoning blend
2 Tbs flour
2 tsp brown sugar
2 tsp black pepper

Spicy Steak Rub
1/4 cup paprika
2 Tbs course salt
2 Tbs chili powder
2 Tbs black pepper
2 Tbs garlic powder
1 1/2 Tbs sugar
1 Tbs onion powder
1 Tbs dried coriander
1 1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp ground allspice



Shop the Sale: Ground Chuck


There are some sales that you really look forward to, because you know you can stock up, save some serious money and not be at a loss for what to do with the product. This is one of those sales: ground chuck. 

Ground chuck, as we’ve discussed before, is the perfect type of beef for burgers. It has just enough fat to retain the juiciness, but not so much fat that your burgers cook away into little nuggets. The fat-to-meat ratio means that you get more meat for your dollar, too. 

But besides burgers, ground chuck is great for tacos, for soups, for spaghetti and lasagna and a dozen other casseroles. I like to buy it in larger lots and take it home for dividing. Some of it will be browned and packaged in 1-pound freezer containers. Some of it will be put in 1-pound packs as uncooked meat. Then I have plenty of options, all waiting in the deep freeze. It makes you feel safe and secure on a cold winter’s day, that’s for sure!



Dine-In: Unbelievable Roast


Need something to feed a crowd that fills that comfort food craving? Try this amazing roast. It uses chuck roast—easy on the budget—and a few packaged ingredients.

Toss it in the slow cooker while you go about your daily activities and it’ll be ready when you get home. Serve it as a roast, or shred and serve over noodles, mashed potatoes or rice. Shredded beef on a bun? Amazing!!  

 Unbelievable Roast 

Ingredients:

3 lb chuck or arm beef roast

1 (2 oz) package dry ranch dressing mix

1 (3 oz) package brown gravy mix

1 (2 oz) package Italian salad dressing mix

1 cup water 

Directions:

Trim any visible fat from the beef and place it in the slow cooker. Combine all three packages of mixes and sprinkle over the roast. Add the water. Cook on low for 7 to 9 hours. 

Reduced-fat tip: after cooking, put the cooked meat and broth in the refrigerator. The fat will rise to the top of the container and you can easily skim it off.



Dine In: Apple-Roasted Pork Tenderloin


This recipe fits with the cold weather—apples and pork are a great duo. Cook this easy dinner in under an hour and listen for the compliments!

Apple-Roasted Pork Tenderloin
Serves 4

Prep time: 10 minutes; Cook time: 40 minutes

 

 2 large sweet-tart apples, such as Fuji or Braeburn, sliced
1 large bulb fennel, trimmed, cored and thinly sliced (or use several ribs of celery)
1 large onion, sliced
1 Tbs plus 2 tsp canola oil1 lb pork tenderloin, trimmed
1 tsp kosher salt
¼ tsp black pepper
3 Tbs cider vinegar

Preheat oven to 475° F.

Toss apples, fennel and onion with 1 Tbs oil in a large bowl. Spread out on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast on the lowest oven rack, stirring twice until tender and golden, about 30 minutes.

About 10 minutes after putting the apples in the oven, sprinkle pork with salt and pepper. Heat the remaining 2 tsp oil in a large ovenproof skillet and sear the pork about 2 minutes per side. Then transfer the pork and pan to the upper shelf of the oven. Roast until just barely pink in the center, to a reading of about 145° F (about 12 to 14 minutes).

Transfer the pork to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Stir vinegar into the pan and scrape up any browned bits. Add the vinegar mixture to the pan of apples.

Slice the pork thinly and serve with the apples. If desired, sprinkle with a few fennel leaves as a garnish.

 

Nutritional Information
Calories Per Serving: 279,   Fat: 10 g (2 g  Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 74  mg, Sodium:371 mg, Carbohydrates: 25 g, Fiber: 5 g, Protein: 25 g.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



Shop the Sale: Big Meat


You know it’s the holidays when the big meats are on sale. Brookshire’s has whole and sliced hams and standing rib roast advertised this week. This is the perfect time for some investment cooking: that’s where you cook up something big like this, and end up with enough meals to last a week! Stock your freezer or feed the family! 

Ham? Day One is the sliced ham. The next day is ham sandwiches. On the weekend you cook up the ham bone for some split pea soup. And if there’s still some left, how about a mac-n-cheese  casserole with ham chunks?

Standing rib roast is the diamond cut of beef. It’s an over-sized prime rib, so the meat is fork-tender and juicy enough to skip the gravy. Fix an elegant roast, and then cook up the bones and scraps to make the best tasting beef broth you’ve ever had. That’s the start of awesome soup, casserole sauce or an amazing beef, gravy and noodles. 

Yup, this is investment cooking. Cook now, enjoy several times down the road!



Shop The Sale: Ground Chuck


A burger’s a burger, right? Actually, no. The type of beef that makes up your burger has a big impact on how it’s going to taste. Extra-lean, ground sirloin, ground beef, ground chuck….which to choose?

 It might surprise you, but the really-really lean beef isn’t the best for a basic burger. You see, burgers need a little bit of fat to maintain juiciness. If you get 97% lean beef, you’ll end up with a lean but tough sandwich.  Ground chuck is the way to go. There’s a bit of fat, but not so much that you have burger shrinkage to deal with.

And you know what else is great about chuck? Factoring in the fat that cooks out, chuck is a better deal than cheaper ground beef! If you take a pound of ground beef and a pound of ground chuck, cook and drain, you’ll have more usable meat left at the end if you use the chuck. Pretty nifty!

Brookshire’s has ground chuck on sale this week, so take advantage of the great price and stock the freezer. You can brown up several pounds of it, divide among freezer bags, and be ready for last-minute casseroles. And this time of year, that’s always a smart move!



Shop The Sale: Split Chicken Breasts


Don’t you love it when you find a great sale, stock up, and can eat cheaply for weeks and weeks? Well, here’s your chance!

This week Brookshire’s has chicken split breasts on sale. A split breast is the kind of chicken that has the bone still in. And it’s split because what we call chicken breasts are really breast halves—a full breast has two big meaty sections.

Being big pieces of chicken, with bones still in, split breasts take longer to cook. If you freeze them as they are, they’ll also take a while to thaw. So to best use this sale, you might want to think ahead and do a little prep work. Here are a couple ideas:

Cook in advance. Place split breasts in a single layer on a baking sheet—as many as you can fit in the pan. Bake about 45 minutes at 375° F.—until the chicken is done. Now you can shred or chop this cooked meat, put in individual-sized freezer bags and fill your freezer with ready-to-use chicken meat. That’s more convenient than a rotisserie chicken! Enchiladas, soup, stir fries, you name it: just add the other ingredients and you’re good to go!

Season in advance. Take several split breasts (however many you need for one meal) and season them—sprinkle on fajita seasoning, or a roasting blend of thyme, basil and rosemary. Slide these pieces in a freezer bag, add a few chopped onions and peppers and stash in the deep freeze. Now, when you’re ready to cook, you’ve got the prep work all taken care of! Just bake and serve.

Use them now. Sounds like a no-brainer, but it really works out to your advantage. Make soup: place several split breasts in a pot of water with onions, carrots and celery; simmer until the chicken is cooked. Remove the chicken and cut the meat up. Add more veggies, some noodles…….and you have soup!

And the same goes for roasted breasts. Fix some for dinner, but fix twice as much as you need. Freeze the rest, or save a day or two to use as a second dinner.

When you get a great price on chicken, you’re smart to take advantage of it. What’s your secret for getting maximum mileage out of split breasts?



Dine In: Grilled Greek Chicken


It’s getting chilly outside! Lots of us southerners grill year round, but when it’s rainy and windy, even the best of us decide against grilling out.

But here’s an idea: do you have a grill pan? I don’t mean an electric grilling machine (the George Forman style)—I’m talking about a grill pan. It looks like a skillet but it has ridges in the bottom that do a really good job of simulating your outdoor grill.

Food sits on the ridges in the pan, and juices and fat drain away. The ridges provide some charring and caramelization, so that gives food that yummy grilled taste. You can use your pan for just about anything—meats, poultry, fish and even vegetables.

Grill pans make grilling easy, especially when it it’s cold outside. Here’s a great recipe for Greek chicken that uses a grill pan. And if you’re outside at the big grill, it works great, there, too.

Grilled Greek Chicken
Serves 4

Prep time: 10 minutes, plus chilling; Cook time: 10 minutes

3 Tbs lemon juice
2 Tbs sherry or red wine vinegar
1 Tbs olive oil
2 tsp chopped parsley
2 tsp minced garlic
1 tsp dried oregano
¼ tsp crushed red pepper.
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
¼ tsp salt

Whisk all the ingredients except chicken and salt in a small bowl. Place chicken pieces in a resealable plastic bag. Add the marinade and turn to coat. Refrigerate at least an hour, or up to 10 hours, turning occasionally.

Remove chicken from the plastic bag and discard the marinade. Sprinkle chicken pieces with salt. Heat the grill pan over medium-high heat until hot. Cook chicken 4 to 5 minutes per side until no longer pink.

Nutritional Information
Calories Per Serving: 160,   Fat: 4 g (1 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol:  75 mg, Sodium: 215 mg, Carbohydrates: 5 g, Fiber:  0 g, Protein: 27 g.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



Shop The Sale: Turkey


It just wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without turkey, would it? But sometimes, turkey is a lot of hassle. It’s big, it’s complicated, it takes up a lot of room in your fridge—but you know, once you get the hang of it, turkey isn’t that hard.  Just think of it as a big chicken, and follow the same rules you’d use when roasting a hen. And since we’re featuring turkeys on sale this week, this is the perfect time for a little Turkey 101.

If you choose a frozen turkey, allow plenty of thawing time—about 1 day for every 5 pounds of turkey. A 15-pound turkey would require three days of thawing time, so make sure to clean out the fridge to have plenty of room If you’re expecting 10 guests for Thanksgiving dinner, a 15-pound turkey will give you plenty of meat, plus some leftovers. 1 ½ pounds per person is a good way to estimate how large a turkey to buy.

Most nutritionists—and I’m a nutritionist—will advise you not to stuff your turkey. It increases cooking time and increases the chances of foodborne illness. It’s a much safer bet to cook the stuffing in a separate baking pan. If you do stuff your turkey, however, fill the turkey cavity only 2/3 full of loosely packed stuffing, and make sure the internal temperature reaches at least 165 degrees.

So what do you get for your work? Turkey is full of health benefits. It’s low in cholesterol and fat, and it provides nearly 50 percent of the daily allowances for folic acid. That helps protect against birth defects, some forms of cancer, and heart disease. A 3-ounce serving of turkey has about 100 calories and plenty of protein. It’s good for you! It’s what you put on the plate along with the turkey that leads to problems!

If you’re new to all this,  you can contact the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline for answers in English or Spanish from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays (or 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day) by calling 1-888-674-6854. And, the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service of the USDA offers the “Ask Karen” service at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Food_Safety_Education/Ask_Karen/index.asp. You can type in your food safety question and receive a list of questions and answers related to your inquiry. 



Dine In: Chipotle Salad


Taco salad. Easy peasy. Anyone can make it and it tastes just fine. But if you’re going to make taco salad the centerpiece of a homemade dinner, here’s the secret to making AMAZING taco salad: it’s the dressing. The dressing ties it all together and turns it into a salad experience—one you’ll remember and share again and again.

So this weekend, why not try our special Chipotle Chicken Taco Salad? It’s simple to toss together, even after a busy day. But the flavors will transport you…and after that, restaurant taco salad just won’t be good enough. Trust me.

Chipotle Chicken Taco salad

Serves 4

Prep time: 34 minutes

Dressing:
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
2/3 cup light sour cream
1 Tbs minced chipotle, canned in adobo sauce*
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp chili powder
1 Tbs lime juice
1/8 tsp salt

Salad:
4 cups shredded romaine lettuce
2 cups chopped, cooked chicken (about 2 breasts….maybe from a rotisserie chicken?)
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
½ cup diced avocado
1 (15 oz) can black beans, drained
1 (8 oz) can corn, drained

*Chipotle chile: If you’ve never used this product before, look in the Mexican foods aisle. It’s in a small can. The sauce is what’s hot and spicy.

To prepare the dressing: combine all ingredients and let stand a few minutes while you prepare the salad. This will blend flavors. Note: if you like hot foods, add some of the adobo sauce from the chilies. Go easy with the adobo: just a bit!

To prepare the salad, combine all ingredients. Drizzle dressing over salad and toss again to coat. Serve immediately.

For a more special salad, place the lettuce on a large plate and arrange the salad ingredients in separate mounts on a plate; then drizzle with the dressing.

Good for diabetic and gluten-free diets (always read product labels to be safe).

Nutritional Information
Calories Per Serving: 249,   Fat: 8 g (2 g  Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 50 mg, Sodium: 550 mg, Carbohydrates: 25 g, Fiber: 7 g, Protein:23 g.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



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Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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