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Dine In: Crunchy Chicken Nuggets!


Eating healthy has its drawbacks. Sometimes you get a big ole hankering for a greasy cheeseburger, and fixing one at home just doesn’t satisfy the craving. My kids always loved chicken nuggets and fries, and try as I might, my homemade version just never made the grade.

Until I learned how to do it up right, that is. Here’s a great recipe, with no deep-frying required. As for the fries, I’ll leave that up to you. If you want to get a bag of frozen potatoes, go for it! By baking them instead of frying, you’ll already be serving a healthier version. But if you prefer to make your own oven fries, I know they’ll make everyone smile. And they’re easy, too! Just slice up potatoes into fry-sized pieces. Toss them with just a tablespoon of oil in a zipper-top plastic bag. Spread out on a baking sheet and bake at 400° F until done. Stir once.

Crunchy Homemade Chicken Nuggets

Serves 4
Prep time: 15 minutes; Cook time: 25 minutes

1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breast, rinsed and patted dry
1 ½ cups plain yogurt (or sour cream)
3 cups crushed corn flakes (finely crushed is key to success)
3 Tbs fresh parsley, chopped
½ tsp salt
½ tsp pepper

Slice chicken breast into 2-inch strips. Marinate the chicken pieces in yogurt for one to 24 hours, refrigerated.

Preheat oven to 375° F.

Prepare the crust by combining the corn flakes, parsley, salt and pepper in a plastic bag. Place chicken pieces, a few at a time, into the bag and shake well to completely coat. Remove chicken pieces and place on a baking pan that has been sprayed with nonstick coating.

Bake about 25 minutes, or until crunchy on the outside and cooked through.

Serve with your favorite sauce.

Nutritional Information
Calories Per Serving: 260,   Fat: 3 g ( 1 g  Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 65 mg, Sodium: 506  mg, Carbohydrates: 25 g, Fiber: 1 g, Protein: 30 g.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.

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Posted in: Cooking, Dine In, Kids


Family Matters: Kids and Crafts


Kids are naturally creative. They’re not restricted by the rules of what ‘should’ be matched and how we arrange designs. If they like it, they do it! With such a liberating view of the world, it’s no wonder kids never run out of things to create.

As a parent, you balance the creativity with a little bit of order. You encourage bold, exciting ideas, but you also make sure that safety comes first. Safety often means organization. Here are some ideas for organizing your kids’ craft activities: 

  • Put materials where they’ve visible and accessible. Labeled boxes and colorful folders help children see the value in keeping everything in its place.
  • Less can be more. Stacks and stacks of paper, and boxes and boxes of crayons just get overlooked. Stock a good amount of inventory, but don’t overwhelm with too much.
  • Craft together. Kids watch how adults do things and take hints from that. If you demonstrate scissor safety and how to squeeze the most glue from a nearly-empty bottle, little ones will learn a lot.
  • Let the process guide the project. If there’s only one correct way to create a project, it can be frustrating. But if just about anything will work, that encourages expression and creativity. This isn’t about scoring points or winning. It’s about having fun!


Family Matters: Juice, Juice, Juice!


How much juice should you give to your baby, and when? Mothers and pediatricians have debated this for ages. Interestingly, opinion is shifting on the matter. While fruit juice is extremely healthy, it’s also extremely sweet, so should actually be given in moderation. After all, it takes a good 10 oranges to make a cup of orange juice. That’s a lot of oranges to be consuming—and a lot of calories!

Pediatricians generally agree that before age 6 months, babies should only receive breast milk or formula, because those are complete foods. (source: American Academy of Pediatrics) After 6 months, if your baby is drinking from a cup, you can introduce some juice into his or her diet. Don’t give juice in a bottle and never put your baby to bed with a bottle of juice. The natural sugars can lead to cavities. Four to six ounces a day is plenty. An option to juice is mashed or pureed whole fruits and vegetables.

As your baby gets older, his or her needs will change. Fruit juice is sweet and many toddlers will overindulge if given the chance. Don’t give your toddler a sippy cup full of juice, or a juice box, to walk around with all day. The prolonged exposure to natural sugars can cause dental problems. Use juice, instead, as a treat or a snack.

When it comes to beverages, babies and toddlers do just fine when introduced to water as the drink of choice. And as always, discuss food concerns with your family doctor or pediatrician.



Family Matters: Compromise, Not Sacrifice!


My kids are much older now, but when they were little, I was a real fanatic about serving only the most-healthy foods possible. Compromise was out of the question. In the years since then, I’ve softened my position, and while my family still eats healthier than most, sometimes you have to give a little here and there. And it’s compromise, not sacrifice. We stay true to the most important aspects of our food plan, but there are some areas where a little splurge now and then can be a good thing!

For instance, in their lunch boxes, or in the snack bag when we went to visit friends, I used to insist on ultra-healthy, ultra-natural foods. And I’m still not going to put cookies and chips in the bag, but I have decided that some of the pre-packaged items I’d always boycotted weren’t really that bad! Crust-less sandwiches, frozen yogurt tubes and juice boxes were still a lot cheaper than buying fast food, and they weren’t as pure as foods I prepared myself, but you know what? They’ll still work just fine. Kids do like to fit in with their friends, and the convenience of ready-to-use items is really handy. At home, they’re happy to eat what they’ve always eaten, but when it’s a special time, the food can be special, too.

We saved these items for play dates and lunch boxes, and it turned out to be a compromise that worked.



Product Talk: School Supplies


Now that school is well underway, you and your children have most likely settled into a routine. It’s amazing how that routine flows pretty smoothly until a sudden disruption throws life into chaos. How often do you get the last-minute news that your child needs to turn in a special project the next day? Maybe it’s the science club volcano or the map of Peru….but regardless, when that call goes out for the super-duper project, it’s the parents who snap to attention and make it all happen. 

The next time you’re on special-project alert, stop by our stores and see what materials we have to help you and your child come out on top. And to get the jump on those last-minute assignments, you can stock up while you’re picking up groceries. A pair of scissors, some poster board, colored pencils and report folders….they’re all right here. Won’t your young student be surprised when you calmly pull out the supplies, instead of panicking? Hey, that’s what parents are for!

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Posted in: Kids, Product Talk


Family Matters: Take ‘Em Along!


Do you dread taking your kids along to the grocery store? I have to admit, it’s always easier when I’m alone, and I definitely stick to my list better when there’s nobody else along to sneak forbidden foods into the buggy. But what about when there’s no choice and the kid(s) will be joining you? Don’t groan; you CAN make this work!

And of course, the key element is to plan ahead. Sometime, totally unrelated to the shopping trip, gather a few tools that will make grocery trips more do-able. Depending on the age of your children, maybe you can make up a bingo card of items to spot in the store; maybe you can have your child match up coupons with products; younger children can help make veggie choices—like broccoli over carrots, or red grapes instead of green. Kids are great at matching colors—even the youngest child can help you look for the reddest bell pepper, or the largest beet.

Does your child pester for treats and candy? How about making a coupon, one per child; once they find what they want, they redeem their coupon to you, and that’s it. Whenever they see a great potential snack item, you can ask your children if they feel this is the best choice for their coupon….often they’ll reconsider!

In short, the success of your shopping trip will depend on a positive attitude all around, as brief a trip as possible, and if you know of any trouble areas (the candy aisle, perhaps?), discuss them before you ever enter the store.

Grocery shopping with kids is a great educational opportunity. You can learn about fractions, budgets, prioritizing, nutrition and making change. It really is worth it!



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Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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