share. The Brookshire's Blog

Family Matters: Leftovers


LeftoversSometimes, no matter how well we plan, some leftovers are inevitable, which is perfectly fine with me. This means a night of hassle-free cooking after working all day.

This week on Monday, I put a roast, carrots and potatoes in the slow cooker to cook on low heat all day. This recipe is so easy. You just add a can of fat-free cream of mushroom soup and a packet of Lipton Onion Soup mix to the slow cooker with your roast and vegetables. It’s really yummy, and you could eat leftovers of this for the next day. However, my family isn’t crazy about having the same meal the next day.

The next day, I took the leftover meat only and put it in the slow cooker with a chopped onion and barbecue sauce to make barbecue beef sliders. This meal was so easy to throw together using the leftovers from the night before, and it was a huge hit with my kiddos.

So, clean out the fridge at least once a week and get creative! Cooking is about creating not wasting, and using leftovers is actually a great way to make something new!



Family Matters: Introducing Your Cat to Your Baby


Introducing Your Cat to Your BabyWhich came first, the baby or the pet?

In a lot of cases, the pet came first and the baby joins the family later. However, that doesn’t mean it has to be an either/or proposition.

Plan ahead as you prepare to welcome baby into your family.

Set boundaries with your cat and the baby’s room immediately. Keep the door closed, or firmly remove the cat whenever he enters. Make sure the nursery is deep-cleaned to remove pet hair or dander, especially if it was a room your cat used to frequent. Do not let your cat sleep on the baby’s bouncy chair, crib, rocking chair or anything else that will be exclusively the baby’s.

Take your cat to the vet to make sure he is up-to-date on all of his shots before the baby arrives.

Keep the cat’s nails trimmed.

If the cat is accustomed to being held, get him used to sitting next to you instead of on your lap.

Do not tolerate any aggression toward the baby, and monitor them closely until you know how your cat will react to his new family member.



Family Matters: Introducing Your Dog to Your Baby


Introducing Your Dog to Your BabyFido was your first baby, but now there’s going to be another one. One who will probably take more kindly to being dressed up in adorable outfits and Halloween costumes.

The first thing you have to do is set clear boundaries for the baby’s space. Even if your pup is super gentle, he’s also probably a lot bigger than your new bundle of joy. Make the baby’s room off-limits to your pooch, just for safety. Go ahead and set up the baby’s swing, bouncy seat and portable play mat, and teach your dog not to touch them.

After baby is born, have your partner bring a burp cloth or blanket home from the hospital before baby arrives. Then, have him hold it at a distance from your dog, teaching your pup some restraint with the little one.

When your baby is ready to come home from the hospital, it’s best that your dog is calm and ready. Maybe take him for a long walk first, so he’s a little tired out. Your dog can sniff near the baby, but most dogs will get the idea pretty quickly.

As your baby grows, also teach him how to touch the dog gently and with respect.



Family Matters: Bird Safety


Bird SafetyDid you know that your pet bird is the adventurous sort?

Well, he is!

The first way to keep him safe is to make sure his environment, in most cases, his cage, doesn’t pose any unseen dangers. Make sure the bars are close enough together so that he can’t fit his head through, or else he might get it caught. Use a water bottle and feeder that are designed for your cage and that don’t pose an extra safety risk. Check doors and spring-locked mechanisms so that your bird can’t get a beak, head, wing or foot trapped either.

If your bird is allowed to fly around your house, make sure the house is bird-proofed, too. Watch for crayons, household cleaners or foods that are harmful to birds. Blankets, yarns, threads in sewing supplies, ropes, macramé decorations and small toys, such as Lego bricks, can also be hazardous. Put away table salts and insecticides, too.

Certain houseplants are toxic for your bird, including avocados, calla lilies, coffee beans, eggplants, Jerusalem cherry, milkweed, mistletoe, philodendron, tobacco, tomatoes, Virginia creeper and yew.



Family Matters: Small Pet Safety


Small Pet SafetySmall animals like hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs and mice can make great pets, but you have to keep them safe!

First of all, make sure their habitat is secure, and they can’t escape! Take care to make sure cage lids, latches, doors and other openings can’t be pried open by your small pet. Also, make sure no one else in your house (i.e. curious children) can leave them open by mistake.

Then, make sure that large pets don’t have access to your small pet. Cats and dogs can definitely be a danger to a hamster, gerbil or other small animal.

Make sure the lining in a small pet’s cage or crate is appropriate. Dryer lint isn’t safe to use for pets because it’s flammable.

When you let your pet out of the cage, make sure they are being monitored and can’t scamper easily under any furniture or appliances.

Finally, do not sleep with your small pet, as you run the risk of suffocating them.



Family Matters: Springtime Benefits


Springtime BenefitsDays of beautiful springtime weather are upon us. We begin to breathe a little deeper, closing our eyes and inhaling as much fresh air as possible…what an amazing feeling! Another great feeling is getting out of the house and doing something with your family, like working in the yard.

I know, your first thought is “what is great about that?” Well, how about working side-by-side with your kids to pick up limbs, rake leaves, mow the yard, clean flower beds and plant flowers. If you are not looking for a big task, just get plastic containers, fill them with potting soil, and plant a few tomato , onion or radish plants, a little “garden” so to speak. The time you spend working together, communicating and spending time in the sun is so rewarding for a parent and the child. You have their undivided attention doing something that does not involve an electronic device, and you get the health benefits of the fresh air and sunshine. Even if you can afford to have someone else do your yard work, you need to do this once and see the benefits firsthand. You could also volunteer to do yard work for a friend or neighbor that needs help. Setting an example for our kids is so important.

Our youngest daughters like working at the barn with their dad, building things out of materials laying around and tearing things down to take to the scrap yard (for spending money). They built a wire cage to put our empty aluminum cans in and a planter made out of a pallet to put herbs in (herbs that keep mosquitoes away). These are things, along with yard work, that they enjoy doing, and it teaches them responsibility of helping around the house and earning money for “extra” things they might want.  All the time that they are working, they are visiting with dad about school, friends and life in general.  There is always a lot of laughter involved, and nothing is sweeter than seeing your child happy and smiling.

Springtime is a great time to reconnect with your kids – get outside and enjoy them, Time passes quickly, and they are grown and gone. Work together to accomplish something around the house. Laugh together to remind you of the joy of having kids, of raising them and of knowing you are teaching them to be strong, independent and thankful. Count your blessings daily, and give thanks for time with your family!



Family Matters: Group Activities


Group ActivitiesYour toddler probably loves group activities.

They’re important for parents, too, as you can make new friends and socialize with someone who speaks in complete sentences and gets you out of the house for a while.

Lots of toddlers like a story time at the local library or bookstore. These are usually free and often involve a story read to the toddlers, with lots of exciting voices and maybe puppets or actors, some songs and games, and maybe a craft project.

You don’t have to take a class to get involved in a music group. You probably have a parent friend with a rudimentary knowledge of music and some spare instruments. Get your toddlers together and let them make some noise, I mean, music.

Tumbling or movement classes provide great sensory input and great fun for your little one. A local gym might have a toddler class, or just go to the playground and swing, run and jump.

Older toddlers might like some kind of art or craft group, with projects fitting for gross and fine motor skills. They can paint large murals, do handprint or footprint crafts, or paint splatter projects. They might also like craft dough and finger paints.

A just play group is great, too. Let the toddlers decide what they’re doing and enjoy watching them interact.



Family Matters: Playtime


PlaytimeI just asked my sons, now 12 and 14 years old, what their favorite toys were when they were about 9 months old.

They each rattled off a list so quickly it made me laugh.

First, they probably don’t have a lot of memories from that time period.

Secondly, I guarantee they were not playing with little Legos at that age.

It was still funny to hear and brought back memories of what were their actual favorite toys in the second half of their first year.

  • Board books, especially the ones with the peek-a-boo windows, were a huge favorite of both my kids. We’d spend hours opening the windows and seeing what was revealed in each story. At 7 months, I was still opening the windows for them. At 12 months, they were trying to do it themselves.
  • Anything that played music. If they could whack it with a chubby hand and make it play music, it was a favorite. We had a plastic toy radio that they could turn on by pressing a button, and it was great to see how they developed to be able to do it themselves.
  • Wooden stacking blocks. Again, at 7 months, they had only rudimentary command of stacking, maybe two at a time, but they could manage a whole lot more by 12 months.
  • Mirrors! Anything reflective is super fun.
  • Baths. Bathtime was often the very best part of the day. The warm water, plus a lot of splashing, was a great combination.
  • Boxes. Empty pots and pans, anything they could just explore completely, with sounds, textures and experiences.
  • The shape sorter! I can’t count the number of hours we played with this. Lots. Lots and lots. It evolved from banging it around to actually sorting the shapes and naming them.

Whatever your baby likes, let him have a lot of playtime. It’s really learning time!



Family Matters: Never Leave Baby in a Car


Never Leave Baby in a CarAs the weather heats up, this blog post is for all parents, not just those with babies.

Do. Not. Leave. Your. Child. In. The. Car.

Each year, approximately 38 children die from overheating because they were left in a car during warm months.

That’s 38 too many.

So far this year, and it’s only April, two children have died from heat-related deaths in cars.

Parents and caregivers, this is 100 percent preventable.

Do not leave your child in the car, period.

It doesn’t matter if you crack the windows; the car will still get too hot. On an 80-degree day, the interior temperature of the car will reach 123 degrees in only one hour.

Heatstroke is defined as when a person’s temperature exceeds 104° F, and their thermoregulatory mechanism is overwhelmed and cannot continue to function properly.

Symptoms of heatstroke include dizziness, disorientation, agitation, confusion, sluggishness, seizures, hot dry skin that is flushed but not sweaty, loss of consciousness, rapid heartbeat and hallucinations.

When the core body temperature reaches 107 degrees, cells are damaged, and internal organs begin to fail and will rapidly lead to death. This happens three to five times faster in children, who cannot regulate their body temperatures as effectively as an adult.

In 54 percent of cases where a child died of heatstroke, their caregiver “forgot” them in the car.

In an additional 24 percent of cases, a child was playing in the car and could not get out.

Teach your children to never, ever play in the car. If they are in the car, you must be in the car with them.

Develop a system of double-checking the car before you leave and lock it. Some adults place their shoe or purse in the backseat, so they have to look in the back before exiting the vehicle.

If you see a child of any age in a hot vehicle, call 911 immediately and take measures to get them out of the car.



Family Matters: Honey Boy Pink Salmon Croquettes


Honey Boy Pink Salmon CroquettesI am so excited to share this salmon recipe with you because my two boys (my husband and son) are not that crazy about fish. You can imagine their faces when they saw me in the kitchen the other night opening up a can of Honey Boy Pink Salmon to make salmon croquettes! Yeah, they were not happy. They were even talking about eating something else instead, but neither of them can cook.

I was prepared to take all of the leftovers to my parents. I knew they would appreciate tasty salmon croquettes. However, as we sat down to dinner, I watched my husband and son gulp down two croquettes each, and they asked for more! You can bet this will be on my dinner menu again in the near future. As for my parents, there were no leftover croquettes to be had!

The recipe is really easy and can be found right on the Honey Boy Pink Salmon can.

Honey Boy Pink Salmon Croquettes
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 to 20 minutes
Serves: 6

1 can Honey Boy Pink Salmon, drained
2 cups soft breadcrumbs
1/3 cup onions, finely minced
1/4 cup Brookshire’s Milk
2 eggs
2 Tbs parsley, minced
1 to 2 Tbs lemon juice, freshly squeezed
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp dill weed
dash of pepper
cooking oil for browning

Combine all ingredients in mixing bowl and mix well. Heat enough cooking oil to cover the bottom of a non stick pan. Form the salmon mixture into patties, and cook over medium heat until browned on the bottom. Turn them over and brown on the other side.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Page 2 of 4812345678910...Last »
Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS