share. The Brookshire's Blog

Shop the Sale: Split Fillets and Tenderloins


Have you ever heard that you pay for convenience? Well, it’s true—and it makes sense. The more processed a food is, the more it costs. And the same happens with chicken breasts. Boneless, skinless breast halves are so convenient and easy to use—but they also cost more than breasts with the bone still in. 

So that’s what makes this week’s advertised sale of Boneless skinless breast fillets and breast tenderloins such a great deal. Where normally these command a premium price, this week you can score a great deal! Stock up and save—fill your freezer with these super-convenient chicken cuts—and you’ll be able to coast through the coming weeks with plenty of chicken to feed your family. 

What do you do with this cut of meat? It’s probably the easiest way to fix chicken that isn’t already re-cooked. They come in a resealable freezer bag, so the day of your meal, pull out as many pieces as you’ll need for any given recipe. Thaw in the fridge or microwave (never on the countertop), and you’re ready to go. Add a dash of salt and pepper, or maybe barbecue sauce or stir-fry sauce, toss in a skillet and you’ll be eating dinner before you know it!



Healthy Living: Tutti Fruitti for Diabetics


Is fruit good for you? Of course it is! It’s full of antioxidants and nutrition—and great taste! When you’re diabetic, though, you have to remember that fruit contains natural sugar—and the carbohydrates need to be balanced in your diet.

Different fruits have differing amounts of carbohydrates, though, and that can help you as you plan your menu for the day. Look below for some comparisons.

Medium apple: 110 calories, 30 grams carbohydrates

Medium banana: 105 calories, 27 g carbs

Pear: 96 calories, 26 g carbs

Watermelon wedge: 86 calories, 22 g carbs

Medium orange: 86 calories, 22 g carbs

1 cup seedless grapes: 62 calories, 16 g carbs

1 cup cantaloupe cubes: 54 calories, 13 g carbs

1 Circular slice pineapple: 42 calories, 11 g carbs

1 cup whole strawberries: 46 calories, 11 g carbs



Product Talk: It’s Bacon!!


Actually, it’s not. It’s not really bacon, but if you’re trying to watch your diet, it’s the next best thing. Bacon Salt, from J&D’s, is a seasoned salt that tastes deliciously bacon-y. It comes in several varieties (regular, hickory and peppered) and a sprinkle on top of a ground turkey burger will make you think you’re having a double-bacon burger deluxe.

The only caution to advise is that it IS salt, so it IS high in sodium. Other than that, it’s fat-free, cholesterol-free and zero calories. Now THAT’s what bacony goodness is all about!

You’ll find J&D’s Bacon Salt in the spices and seasonings section of Brookshire’s.



Dine In: Beef Tenderloin


If you’re like me, most of the time you’re saving every nickel you can. Times are tough! But every once in a while, you need a special dinner. Maybe you’ve got extra-special friends coming over, or maybe you just need a well-deserved splurge. If you want to show someone how much you care, here’s a tip: don’t make reservations….make dinner at home! It’s the ultimate gift from the heart.

Ever had a beef tenderloin? A tenderloin is what filet mignon steaks are made from. To make filet, the tenderloin is sliced into rounds. So a tenderloin roast is just one large filet mignon—and man oh man, is it delicious. It’s pricey—but trust me, you get what you pay for. Watch for a sale in the meat department and grab one. Put it in the freezer until that special time comes, and you’ll be ready to splurge. Bonus: because it’s so low-fat, it’s actually a pretty healthy cut of meat!

Side dishes can be as simple or as elegant as you wish: mashed potatoes, steamed broccoli, fresh asparagus or a tossed salad. Simple is good when you have a delicious main course like this!

Simple Roast Tenderloin
Prep time: 10 minutes; Cook time: 45 minutes

3 to 4 pound beef tenderloin, trimmed and tied with twine (to help it hold its shape)
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ teaspoon onion powder
½ teaspoon garlic salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Place the tenderloin on a broiler pan. Rub roast with olive oil and sprinkle with onion, garlic and pepper.

Roast the tenderloin for 15 minutes per pound for rare, or 20 minutes per pound for medium rare.

Let roast rest 15 minutes before carving.

Serves 6

Nutritional Information
Calories per serving: 307.  Fat: 16 grams (5 gr. saturated fat), cholesterol: 156 mg., sodium: 101 mg., carbohydrates: 0 gr., fiber: 0 gr., Protein: 49 gr.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



Shop The Sale: It’s Soup Time!


Who doesn’t love a big bowl of chicken soup on a chilly fall evening? Chicken noodle, chicken and rice, chicken and vegetable, chicken tortilla, chicken and dumplings….there’s a soup for every day of the week. If you remember soup like grandma used to make, there’s one secret for making it happen without stress and fuss. The secret? Use a slow cooker!

They’re inexpensive appliances, and if you don’t have one in the back of your pantry, do run out and get one—it’ll be worth its weight in chicken soup!

On sale this week at Brookshire’s is Pilgrim’s Pride Whole Chicken—the key ingredient to great chicken soup. And with your slow cooker, making it is a snap!

Rinse the chicken, and check inside to be sure there aren’t any giblets (innards) in there. Place the chicken in your slow cooker. Throw in whatever vegetables seem nice and soup-worthy:  an onion, garlic, celery, a potato or two…..this isn’t for the final soup yet, but to create a really flavorful broth. If you like, season with salt, pepper, bay leaf and poultry seasoning.  Add water to fill the cooker about halfway and turn on the slow cooker and let it cook all day (or all night, depending on your schedule).

After 8 hours or so, pull out the cooked chicken and place on a cutting board to cool slightly. Strain the incredibly delicious-smelling broth. Skim off the fat for a healthier soup.

You can chill the broth to make soup later, or proceed: Put the broth in a kettle and add the vegetables you love to see in soup: a bag of frozen mixed veggies, maybe, or corn, green beans….it’s your call. Pull the chicken meat off the bones (it practically shreds by itself) and add. Adjust the seasonings: add salt, pepper or poultry seasoning to your personal tastes. Simmer until veggies are done. Add cooked rice, or uncooked noodles (or whatever other ingredients your recipe calls for), simmer a few more minutes, and your soup is ready to serve.

Wasn’t that easy? And it all started with whole chickens on sale!

Note: omit pasta for a great gluten-free meal!



Healthy Living: Hummus Dip


Have you ever tried hummus? It’s a really popular dish in middle-eastern countries, but it’s getting pretty well-known in the USA, too. Hummus is a bean dip, only instead of black beans or pintos, it uses chick peas. Mash up the chick peas and season them up and you have hummus!

Nutritionally, hummus is amazing. It’s vegetarian and even vegan (no animal products whatsoever) and is low in calories, fat, cholesterol and carbohydrates. Hummus can also be flavored with additions like peanut butter, chopped vegetables, soy sauce….you name it!

So the next time you have friends over for appetizers, bring out the hummus. You’ll look sophisticated and they’ll  love the tasty new treat!

Make-Your-Own Hummus Dip
Makes 2 cups

13-oz can chick peas (also called garbanzo beans), drained
3 Tbs olive oil
3 Tbs lemon juice
½ tsp crushed garlic or garlic powder

Combine all ingredients in a food processor. Serve with fresh vegetables or bite-sized pieces of pita bread for dipping.

Nutritional Information
Calories per 1/4 -cup serving: 101.  Fat: 6 grams  (1 gr. saturated fat), cholesterol: 0 mg., sodium: 135 mg., carbohydrates: 9 gr., fiber: 2 gr.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



Healthy Living: Eat Well!


If you’re new to diabetes, you may feel like your life is suddenly full of CAN’Ts: I can’t have this, I can’t do that….and it’s frustrating. Actually, though, your diabetes diagnosis can be a moment of empowerment. By changing your diet, you’ll be declaring your intent to become healthy—and what’s more awesome than that?

In many regards, a diabetic diet is really just a HEALTHY diet. You’ll be eating pure, natural, wholesome great foods—and that’s something everyone would be smart to consider! Instead of a chicken-fried steak smothered in cream gravy, enjoy a pan-grilled chicken breast, steamed broccoli and a salad—and know that you’re being a positive role model to EVERYONE, not just diabetics. This is a healthy diet that benefits everyone!

Diabetics need to take care to balance carbohydrates throughout the day—that’s crucial. But diabetics don’t need to eat special, exotic foods. If it’s wholesome and healthy, it’s probably okay for a diabetic diet. Bread and desserts are part of that diet as well! Talk with your doctor and your dietician and you’ll find that what you CAN eat is actually what we all SHOULD be eating every day.



Healthy Living: Swine Flu & Diabetics


The H1N1 virus, commonly called swine flu, is spreading. Here’s the good news: Being diabetic does not put you at greater risk for catching the flu. And here’s the bad news: if you do catch the flu, as a diabetic, you’re more likely to face complications.

Since having diabetes puts you in a high-risk group, you should try to get the flu shot—both the standard flu shot and the one for H1N1, when available. If the worst happens and you do come down with the flu, be sure to let your health care providers and family know. They’ll want to monitor you for dangerous developments.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), it’s important for diabetics to keep their insulin going. Continue taking your medications, even if you can’t eat. Merely having the flu will raise your blood glucose levels, and irregular eating can make that even worse. Monitor your blood glucose levels more than you usually would, and if your numbers start to change, notify your doctor right away.

For most people, getting the flu means a week of uncomfortable misery. Diabetic patients face greater risks and complications—so it’s not something to take lightly. Work hard to prevent it, and if you do get the flu, contact your doctor.



Page 4 of 41234
Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS