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Family Matters: Gerber’s squeezable fruits & veggies


If you are the parent or grandparent of a toddler, you know these two things about their eating habits:

  • They want to do it themselves.
  • And their version of “doing it themselves” often involves getting more of the food on their hair, clothes, and chair than into their little bellies.

So here is a way they can achieve their first objective, without you having to clean up the second one: Gerber’s new Graduates Grabbers . These  squeezable, healthy fruits and vegetables come in a pouch that’s easy for little ones to handle themselves.

The new foods, just widely available this fall, come in five flavors. Many children will think they’re getting a juice pouch – but you’ll  know they’re really getting real, pureed fruit and vegetables. In fact, those of you who are always trying to get your kids to eat more vegetables will be pleased to note that, unlike many other pouch products, two of these flavors include veggies in the mix. (The flavors include Banana Blueberry; Apple, Pear & Peach; Apple & Sweet Potato with Cinnamon; Pear & Squash; and Apple, Mango & Strawberry.)

The contents of each pouch are made with 100 percent natural produce, and without any fake colors or flavors. There’s no extra sugar or salt added, either. Each contains two servings of pureed fruit and/or vegetables, and a good helping of Vitamins E and C.

The pouch is smartly designed, too. It’s just the right size to fit in little hands, but the twist-off cap is large enough that it does not present a choking hazard, a potential problem with some brands of pureed foods geared to toddlers. And they will fit nicely into diaper bag or backpack when you’re running out and would like to take a snack beyond Cheerios.

As with any food, you’ll want to supervise your child while they eat a Grabber. But thanks to this self-contained packaging and the child-friendly flavors, you don’t have to worry so much that your child will end up wearing their snack instead of eating it.



Family Matters: Safe cold and flu relief for babies


As a parent, it’s heartbreaking when your baby is coughing, sneezing, crying and clearly suffering from the symptoms of a bad cold.

Of course you want to offer relief. But even though it may seem tempting to give a suffering baby just a tiny bit of cough or cold medicine intended for older children, there are extremely good reasons you should never do so without seeking the advice of your doctor first.

First, a refresher is in order, especially if you did not have an infant at the time the rules changed: Over-the-counter cough and cold products for infants under age 2 were voluntarily removed from the market by manufacturers in 2008, responding to concerns raised by the Food and Drug Administration. Now, even cold medicines for older children carry a warning that they are not to be used in children under age 4.

The new rules apply to products containing these decongestants:

  • Ephedrine
  • Pseudoephedrine
  • Phenylephrine

They also apply to these antihistamines:

  • Diphenhydramine
  • Brompheniramine
  • Chlorpheniramine

There had been numerous reports of illness and even some deaths in children under age 2 who had been given these products, according to FDA reports. Often, this was due to misuse or over-dosage by caregivers who may have misunderstood label instructions.  In addition, these medications have little effect on the duration or severity of an infant’s cold symptoms, according to the Mayo Clinic.

It is important that parents do not attempt to modify doses of medications meant for older children and give them to infants anyway. For instance, do not attempt to guess what a “safe” dose of a children’s cough medicine would be for your six-month-old. 

Instead, seek a physician’s advice for any symptoms that seem particularly severe, especially for infants under three months of age. For babies three months and over, you should probably call your doctor if a cough lasts more than a week, a fever hovers at 102 degrees or your child refuses fluids.

In the meantime, attempt to bring relief with other, safer remedies, approved by the FDA:

Infant formulas of acetaminophen or ibuprofen: Usually provided in a liquid form administered by droppers, these medicines can be used to reduce fever, aches and pains. Choose your favorite name brand, or select store brands/generics that provide precisely the same medication at a cost savings. Acetaminophen is considered safe for babies over three months, and ibuprofen is considered OK for those over 6 months.

Cool mist humidifier: This can help baby’s swollen nasal passages shrink, allowing for easier breathing.

Plenty of clear fluids: Staying well-hydrated will help flush cold viruses out of your baby’s system faster.

Saline nose drops or spray: Helps relieve stuffy noses by thinning out mucus. In children under one year, you can try combining nasal drops with a bulb syringe or aspirator, to suck out excess mucus. (Children over about age 1 often actively protest any attempt at suctioning.)



Family Matters: Feeding Baby Safely


It’s a big step in the care and feeding of your baby: The day you begin feeding solid foods.

While you may receive lots of well-meaning advice from grandparents, friends, and even the occasional stranger, you should recognize that recommendations may well have changed since the advice-giver was feeding their baby.

Always consult your pediatrician before starting your infant on solid foods. And brush up on some of the current prevailing wisdom on safely feeding solids.

When to start: Most babies can start eating solid food when they are between four and six months of age. That’s when they are able to swallow foods, as opposed to pushing back with their tongue against a feeding spoon. Yes, Grandma may say that she started feeding cereal when her baby was just six weeks old and it helped the baby sleep through the night, but today, pediatricians recognize infants can’t properly digest or swallow solids that young, and cereal served from a bottle can be a choking hazard.

Veggies first? You may have heard you should offer vegetables before trying fruit, so a baby used to applesauce doesn’t turn up her nose at the stronger tastes of things like pureed cauliflower or peas. Guess what? Researchers say it doesn’t really matter.  Babies are born with an innate taste for sweet foods, and that preference doesn’t change whether they’re fed peas or peaches first.  

Don’t hold the spice: The preference for bland, un-spiced baby food is largely a cultural issue. In other parts of the world, babies are served food that’s spiced the same way as adult food, and there’s little research that spicy foods harm children. Use common sense and stay away from really spicy things that may harm babies’ sensitive mouths and noses – no wasabi or habaneros – but a little cinnamon, ginger, cumin or even mild chiles like poblanos may tickle your baby’s palate and help them learn to eat a wider variety of foods while young.

Safety first: Baby-food recalls are often a parent’s big worry, but they’re actually quite rare. A much bigger safety issue is just following safety rules for proper feeding and food-handling.   

• Do not feed baby directly from the jar of food, unless you plan to use the entire jar at one meal. Saliva from your baby’s mouth can lead to the growth of harmful bacteria in the food. If you must serve from the jar, throw away any uneaten portion.
• Never microwave baby food. Uneven heating can cause hot spots that can burn baby’s mouth.
• Never leave a baby alone with food _ not even for a minute, while running to answer the phone.
• Don’t feed honey to a baby under 12 months; some pediatricians, in fact, now recommend 18 months as the cutoff.
• Slowly introduce potentially allergenic foods like peanut butter, eggs and wheat. A few years ago, the American Academy of Pediatrics reported that research does not support holding off on allergenic foods until after age 1, clearing the way to offer them to babies sooner. However, many pediatricians still suggest going slowly, especially if your baby has eczema or there’s a family history of food allergies or asthma.



Family Matters: Peach and Chicken Delight


Yield: 10 portions (baby sized) 

Ingredients: 

1/2 cup cooked boneless, skinless chicken, chopped

1/4 cup cooked brown rice

1 ripe peach

1 Tbs peach juice

1 Tbs milk

2 tsp wheat germ 

Directions:

Mix all ingredients together and chop roughly in a food processor or blender. The older your baby gets, the larger pieces they’ll be able to work with. 

Nutritional Information:  Calories per Serving: 34, Fat: 1 g (0 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 6 mg, Sodium: 5 mg, Carbohydrates: 5 g, Fiber: 0 g, Protein: 3 g. 

© 2011 Brookshire Grocery Co. Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.

 



Family Matters: Huggies Little Swimmers


Is this the first summer you will bring your bundle of joy to the pool with you?  Don’t worry about pesky diapers that swell in the pool, pick up Huggies Little Swimmers Swim pants. Huggies Little Swimmers are made with absorbent materials that do not swell when your baby is playing in the water.

You can get Little Swimmers for your infant and even your toddler. With leak guard protection you will not have to worry about leaks when your baby is splashing around in the pool. When heading to the lake or the pool always keep on eye on your little one!  



Family Matters: Baby Wipes


Baby wipes can be used on more than just babies! They can be used as a wet napkin on a picnic or a wipe to clean up a mess. Baby wipes are a must have on any road trip regardless the age of your children.



Family Matters: Infant Formula


 

Did you know that all infant formulas sold in the US are subject to the same regulations governing manufacturing and ingredients per the Infant Formula Act of 1980?

Store Brands formulas, while value priced, meet the same exact FDA nutritional requirements as all the National Brands, while offering substantial savings. Top Care Baby Formula is available in all Brookshire’s stores. Like all formulas, Top Care is nutritionally complete and meets the nutritional guidelines determined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 



Family Matters: Road Trip


Baby wipes are not just for the baby, but for the whole family. When going on a road trip there’s always a generic list of items you pack, like snacks, drinks, flashlights and blankets. An item you may want to add to your list, if it’s not already on it, is baby wipes. When traveling with small children, spills can easily happen. Having baby wipes handy can quickly clean up any spills along the way. 

Young children love to touch everything! After a stop on your trip, you can use the baby wipes to clean your children’s hands.  Baby wipes can also be used throughout your trip to clean surfaces, like the handles of a shopping cart.

Next time you are planning a short trip to the grocery store or a long trip to see grandma, don’t forget to pack your baby wipes! 



Family Matters: Choking Hazards


If you are worried about your baby choking on different foods, partening.com provides a list of foods that could be a choking hazard for your baby.

 These foods are nuts, seeds, large chucks of fruit, meat, cheese and vegetables, popcorn and hard candies. Also, remember never leave your baby unattended while they eat! 

Source:Parenting.com



Family Matters: Introducing Solid Foods


Is it time for you to start introducing solid foods to your baby? We have all seen the commercials of babies eating Cheerios, well one of the first foods you can introduce to your baby is “O” shaped and puffed cereals. Other foods you can start to introduce, when your baby is ready, are mushy foods like diced bananas applesauce and avocado. Pick foods that are easy for your baby to eat, nutritious, and are cut small enough for your baby to eat.



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Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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