share. The Brookshire's Blog

FAMILY MATTERS: FIRST WORDS


BabyFirst words often emerge between 8 and 12 months.

It was such a thrill to me to hear my boys’ first words. My older son’s first word was “light.” My younger son’s was “bird.” “Light” made sense to me because lights of any kind were his very favorite things. “Bird” was a bit more perplexing, but I went with it. Both boys said their first words before they babbled “mama” or “dada.” For the record, “D” sounds are easier to say, which is why many little ones say “dada” before “mama.”

TIP 7-12 months : Turn everything you do with your baby into play. They’ll integrate everyday tasks more quickly.



FAMILY MATTERS: BABY SERIES


BabyMy friend’s daughter, Sweet Baby, just turned six months old. Can I just say I can’t even fathom where the past six months have gone? It goes by so quickly, and babies develop in leaps and bounds at this point in their lives.

Sweet Baby surprised her mama this weekend by pulling up to standing at the coffee table in the living room.

Don’t be alarmed if your six month old is not pulling up to stand yet. The average age for pulling to standing is about 9 months. Sweet Baby is just proving to be precocious.

Another milestone a baby should hit around five months of age is hugging! What’s better than when your baby learns to wrap their chubby little arms around yours? Let baby hug you, a stuffed toy or a blanket. Some babies aren’t crazy about hugging. My older son certainly wasn’t, but if yours is a cuddler, then hug away.

Tip 0-6 months: When baby begins to be mobile, it’s time to baby proof. Take all breakable, sharp and heavy objects off of coffee tables and shelves. Make sure your cabinets have locks if they contain items that might be dangerous to baby.



Family Matters: Self Care


FamilyMatters_Baby1336Months_91313_228x173This is about the stage for your toddler when they not only WANT to do everything for themselves, but it’s about time for you to start letting them.

Curt always wanted to brush his own teeth. Now, I wasn’t going to completely relinquish care of his teeth, but I let him brush first before I took over, and that eliminated so much of the power struggle that is common in kids this age. The same thing happened with washing his hair. He no longer wanted me to rinse the shampoo out of his golden-brown baby locks; he wanted to do it himself. So, I let him dump that cup of water over his head, repeatedly. It made him giggle, too. Go figure.

At this age, they can try to comb their own hair. They can help choose what foods they eat (within reason, obviously). They can feed themselves. They can pick up and put away their own toys with help. Independence, here we come!

Tip 13-36 months: Have child-sized brooms, mop cloths (for wiping the table) and sponges available for your toddler, and allow him to clean like the adults do.



Family Matters: Strollin’


BabyBetween 7 and 12 months, baby will start to toddle around. It’s MUCH more fun, at this age, for baby to push your stroller instead of having to ride in it all the time. It’s not always practical to let baby push, but when you can, put the stroller in a safe spot (backyard, inside hallway) and let him go to town. He’ll feel important and powerful. Just make sure he doesn’t tip it back on top of himself!

Tip 7-12 months: Bring out the balls. Rolling a beach ball back and forth is a great inside activity.



Family Matters: Rolling Over


Baby

Rolling over was one of the first, big “Mom-screech” moments in my baby’s development. It happened around four months old for both of my kiddos, although between four and six months is in the range of normal. Belly-to-back rolling usually happens first, maybe during a tummy time session. About a month later, baby will roll from back to stomach in their first venture toward mobility. Luke, my second son, was a rolling machine. In fact, at one point, I was certain he’d never bother learning to crawl because he could just roll everywhere he went. I was surprised he didn’t make himself dizzy. Curt, my older son, was never much on rolling. He only did it when he needed to and without the enthusiasm Luke displayed for the feat. Once they start rolling, use caution about where you place baby and make sure nothing dangerous is within reach.

Tip 0-6 months: When baby becomes mobile, it may be time to pad sharp corners of furniture, fixtures and fireplaces with some kind of buffer between the object and baby’s noggin. Store-bought pads for all kinds of furniture are available, and you can certainly fashion homemade padding as well.



Family Matters: Snacks Rule in the Toddler World!


You don’t have to keep resorting to the same old, same old. Break out of the snack rut and help your toddler learn new foods.

Some fun toddler snacks include cucumber slices, cheese sticks or cubes, peanut butter on mini waffles, zucchini bread, dried fruits and vegetables, tofu, whole grain cereals, quesadillas, yogurt, eggs in a pita, baked sweet potato  fries, kale chips, hummus with veggies, pasta (cold or warm), yogurt and fruit smoothies, graham crackers, homemade fruit leathers or granola, unsweetened applesauce and meats cut into bite-sized pieces.

TIP 13-36 months: Sometimes a simple “no” is best. Explaining, rationalizing and giving choices about good and bad behavior is appropriate for an older child, but if your toddler is doing something wrong, sometimes “no” is more effective.



Family Matters: Stacking Toys


At this point in life, baby is sitting up pretty well (maybe with help at the 6-month mark and like a champ by 12 months) and likes to play!

Use stacking toys for baby at this stage of development to teach many different skills.

Stacking toys promotes gross and fine motor skills.

They teach organization as you can stack by size or color.

Use stacking toys to introduce other simple words and descriptions, like yellow or red, big and little, or top and bottom. You can also use these toys to reinforce understanding of cause and effect.

Of course, you can also make the stack topple at the end! Everyone loves a good mess.

TIP 7-12 months: Don’t forget to introduce foods like mango, kiwi and lentils into your baby’s diet. Don’t be discouraged if they don’t like it at first; some foods have to be presented up to 10 times before a little one takes to it.



Family Matters: Tummy Time


Starting when baby is very tiny, it’s good for them to get supervised tummy time! Putting junior on his belly on a soft blanket helps him develop both physically and mentally, according to experts.

Tummy time helps strengthen baby’s neck and upper back muscles as they try to turn their head, look around and reach for toys, reducing the risk of SIDS because he can move his head away from objects blocking his airway.

When you first start tummy time, baby won’t be able to do much but attempt to move his head from side to side and maybe look up. However, it gives him a different view of the world than being on his back. Spending time on his tummy also helps prevent the flat spots many young ones develop on the back of their heads from always lying in that position.

Start tummy time right after birth, at least once a day, for about five minutes at a time and work up as your baby develops. Don’t push them. If baby is screaming, roll him back over to his back. Only go for as long as baby can tolerate it. You might want to wait until after their umbilical cord stump has fallen off, though, as that can cause some discomfort.

Soon, they’ll turn themselves onto their tummy to play. I had a textured blanket that we used for tummy time. It had bumpy fabric, silky fabric, ribbons and ties that my boys could feel and grasp for.

TIP 0-6 months: Sweet potatoes are a wonderful first food for baby. Buy organic sweet potatoes at Brookshire’s, bake them until soft, puree with a bit of formula or water and voila, a perfect meal for baby!



Family Matters: Social Interaction


When your toddler is about 2 years old, he’ll really like social activities like story time. However, don’t expect him to get down and interact with all the other kids. Little ones at this age still primarily parallel play, that is, they engage in their own activity next to another child. This is perfectly OK. You don’t have to force Jacob to share with Sophie or even be interested in her toys or acknowledge she’s there. He’s still primarily interested in his caregiver and whatever toy he finds most amusing at that given moment. But introducing him to other kids in group settings (whether that be one other child or 10) is good for his development at this point. So maybe try a library story time, or a group music class, or just take your toddler to the park and let them sort out the early social cues.

TIP 12 to 36 Months: Say no to your toddler. That’s right. A simple word, “No.” This is what a toddler can understand. Rationalizing with them, “Do you think that’s a good choice?” is more appropriate for a school-age child. But when they’re 2 and 3, keep it simple!



Family Matters: Car Seat Safety


Your baby is probably big enough now to transition from an infant carrier car seat to a convertible seat. But always, always, always keep it rear-facing. A lot of experts are now recommending that you keep baby in a rear-facing position longer than age 12 months.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends, based on a 2007 study from the University of Virginia, “children under 2 are 75 percent less likely to suffer severe or fatal injuries in a crash if they are facing the rear.”

“A baby’s head is relatively large in proportion to the rest of his body, and the bones of his neck are structurally immature,” said the statement’s lead author, Dr. Dennis R. Durbin, scientific co-director of the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “If he’s rear-facing, his entire body is better supported by the shell of the car seat. When he’s forward-facing, his shoulders and trunk may be well restrained, but in a violent crash, his head and neck can fly forward.”

What more information do you need?

TIP 7 to 12 Months: Babies this age are now eating solid foods. To help them stay full, make sure to provide about 3 full tablespoons of protein at each meal. 



Page 5 of 1112345678910...Last »
Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS