share. The Brookshire's Blog

Family Matters: “Get a Job”


Get a JobEarlier this month, I had the opportunity to meet the world famous Dr. Temple Grandin and hear her speak.

Dr. Grandin is world-renowned for her work in animal-behavior in the livestock industry, and she has designed the front end of every meat-processing plant in the country. She’s also maybe one of the most recognizable and vocal autism brains in the world.

The point of Dr. Grandin’s speech was that society has done a great job of diagnosing autism and offering early intervention options for our kids. What we are not doing well, as a society and as an educational system, is transitioning people with autism into the real world.

When you think about it, this probably extends far beyond only young adults with autism.

Every time someone in the audience would stand up to ask a question, she asked how old the child in question was, and then her response was a resounding “Get them a job,” no matter the question.

A job outside of the home, working for someone other than family, is the first step in building confidence and responsibility in our young people, she said.

Having to keep a schedule and be accountable is a life skill that is best taught early and often, according to Dr. Grandin. Kids as young as 11 and 12 can walk dogs, do yard work or serve as greeters and ushers at church, she offered.

Having a job gives our youth skills, lets them earn their own money, and helps get them out of their bedrooms and away from video games, she emphasized repeatedly.
(Brookshire’s hires teenagers at 16!)

It’s important for kids to do internships, she said, starting every summer in high school and working their way through college or trade school. It’s also important for adults to serve as mentors and TEACH children good skills and work ethic, instead of doing it for them.

She suggested pursuing internships in a variety of fields that interest you, as it helps kids focus in on what they want to do later in life.

My 13-year-old already has a job and my 15-year-old is looking for one. Perhaps, we’ll have him look a little more diligently.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Family Matters


Shop the Sale: Sweet Potato Hash with Caramelized Onions


Sweet Potato Hash with Caramelized OnionsPrep Time: 15 mins
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 mins
Serves: 8

What could be better than sweet potatoes, caramelized onions and chorizo? For breakfast, brunch or really any meal of the day, this hearty dish will satisfy even the most voracious eaters. Chef note: get perfectly caramelized onions every time by ensuring you don’t crowd the pan (we recommend a 12” pan for two large onions) and keeping the heat low. Remember, you’re not sautéing here! Serve with your breakfast favorites or as a side dish for a main meal.

Ingredients

1 Tbs unsalted butter
2 lbs yellow onions (about 2 large), sliced into thin half moons
1 Tbs kosher salt, plus more to taste if necessary
1 lb Mexican chorizo
3 lbs sweet potatoes (about 3 large potatoes), peeled and 1/2-inch diced
6 large cloves garlic, minced
2 long stems fresh rosemary, finely minced
3 Tbs olive oil
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions
Heat oven to 450° F. Melt butter in skillet over medium-high heat. When it foams up, add onions; sprinkle lightly with salt. Lower heat slightly. Cook onions for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally and lowering heat further if they begin to burn. Cook until onions are very dark brown and caramelized. Meanwhile, put chorizo in another skillet. Brown over medium-high heat, chopping up into fine crumbles with spatula. Cook meat for about 10 minutes, or until browned and beginning to crisp. Drain any excess fat.

While chorizo and onions are cooking, place sweet potatoes, garlic and rosemary in large bowl. Toss with olive oil, kosher salt and generous amount of black pepper. Mix well. When onions are dark brown and meat is beginning to get crispy, stir them into sweet potatoes. Mix to combine. Line large baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. Spread out sweet potato mixture evenly. Roast sweet potatoes for 30 to 45 minutes or until soft and browned. Remove from oven. Serve hot with your favorite breakfast accompaniments.

Calories Per Serving: 567, Fat: 29 g (10 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 54 mg, Sodium: 1603 mg, Carbohydrates: 60 g, Fiber: 10 g, Protein: 18 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

Chef Tips

The Sweet Benefits of Sweet Potato
Not only do they taste good, they’re good for you. Sweet potatoes are a great source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, manganese, copper and pantothenic acid. They also provide potassium, dietary fiber, niacin, vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and phosphorus, plus they’re high in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients.

Sweet Potato Latte Anyone?
While you might be more accustomed to sweet potato bakes than lattes, there are a lot of surprising (and delicious) ways to use sweet potato. From coffee to smoothies, hummus and pizza, chili and biscuits to decadent deserts like Ginger-Sweet Potato Cheesecake and Sweet Potato Pie, the uses for sweet potatoes are almost endless. Try swapping them for meat in your quesadillas, adding them to old favorites like Mac & Cheese or building a whole meal around them with recipes like Sweet Potato Fritters.



Healthy Living: Cauliflower Rice


Cauliflower RiceI resisted the craze of making cauliflower into rice for a long time, a very long time.

Now I regret every, single, solitary minute of my stubborn holdout.

Cauliflower rice is the best thing since sliced bread, without the carbs, that is.

Cauliflower rice gives you the impression you’re eating rice without the starch.

It’s simple and amazing. Use in place of your fried rice, your Mexican rice or whatever other kind of rice you fix. It’s faster to cook, too. No fluffing with a fork required.

Cauliflower Rice

Ingredients:
1 head cauliflower
2 Tbs coconut oil
salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:
Remove florets from the head of cauliflower, and pulse in food processor until it has formed small “grains.”

Heat coconut oil over medium-high heat in a large skillet. Sauté cauliflower until crisp tender, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately, or use in another dish.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 75, Fat: 7 g (6 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 601 mg, Carbohydrates: 4 g, Fiber: 2 g, Sugar: 1 g, Protein: 1 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Product Talk: Epsom Salt


Epsom SaltI could extol the virtues of Epsom salt for hours.

Hours, I tell you.

I mix them into my bath water with a few drops of essential oil for the best, most relaxing bath there is.

They’re great for inflammation and swelling: I put a heaping tablespoon into the bucket of ice water my track athlete uses to soak his foot after a hard practice or competitive meet.

They’re wonderful for extracting toxins. Did you know that if you soak an area with a splinter in water with Epsom salt, the splinter will come to the surface of your skin, making it super easy to extract?

Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate and has about a trillion uses. Since it’s spring, I wanted to talk about one of them: homemade miracle plant growth stimulator.

Yep, you don’t need to put chemicals on your spring plantings to make them grow into bountiful and beautiful plants. Simply use 1 teaspoon baking soda and 1 tablespoon Espom salt, and dissolve into a gallon of water. I’ve used this on my new rose bushes, my new hosta, my tomatoes and my new annuals.

It has produced lush, huge plants in a short amount of time.

Add one more wonderful addition to the list of uses of Epsom salt.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Dine In: Frico


FricoThere I was, sitting at a small, wrought iron table adorned with a single candle, in Venice. I was sitting canal-side, the water lapping at the smooth stone as the sun set on another gorgeous day in Italy.

I’d spent all afternoon on the island of Murano, watching glass heated to unholy temperatures and turned and spun and morphed into the most beautiful colored creations. Murano, a short vaporetto ride from Venice, is known for its beautiful glass creations. I had a few wrapped securely and carefully tucked into my suitcase to bring home.

Venice, known for its labyrinth of canals, the famous St. Mark’s Square and gondola rides, also has amazing restaurants tucked into quiet corners.

I happened to pick one where no one spoke English, and my Italian, which was pretty much limited to the language of food, failed me miserably.

“Frico?” I repeated to the waiter, who had rattled off the prix fixe rapidly, almost impatiently.

“Frico,” he repeated, definitively.

I nodded affirmation, hoping that my third course was going to be something recognizable.

Luckily, it was.

Frico can mean different things in different parts of Italy. In the far north, it’s a potato and cheese dish, almost like a gratin but with a crispy baked topping of cheese.

In other regions, frico is a cheese crisp. It’s cheese, nothing else, baked into a cracker-like bite of deliciousness.

They’re so easy to make, and the flavor that develops from baking the cheese (think of the crispy bites you scrape off of the pizza pan) is delightful. You can play with flavor combinations of the cheeses and spices.

Frico

Ingredients:
1 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated (or Asiago, aged cheddar, aged Gouda, Manchego or another hard cheese)
1/2 tsp crushed cumin seed, toasted (or fennel)

Directions:
Preheat oven to 375° F. Cover two baking sheets with parchment paper or a nonstick mat. Grate cheese, and toss with the spice. Evenly spoon 2 tablespoons of the mixture onto the parchment paper, creating a 4-inch round that is evenly distributed across. Spread with a fork, if necessary. Bake one sheet at a time until the edges begin to crisp and darken, about 6 to 8 minutes. Remove from oven, and loosen from the pan with a large spatula. Cool over a rolling pin to make them bowl-shaped, or lay flat on paper towels. Cool completely.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 221, Fat: 16 g (12 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 50 mg, Sodium: 360 mg, Carbohydrates: 0 g, Fiber: 0 g, Sugar: 0 g, Protein: 18 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Cooking, Dine In


Family Matters: Save, Spend, Give


Save, Spend, GiveBoth of my boys got their first jobs recently. I’m so proud of them both for wanting to earn money, for the responsibility it takes to hold down a job, and for the life skills they are gaining while working in their early teenage years.

With the first job comes the first paycheck. Seriously, nothing was more thrilling for them than holding that piece of paper in their hands.

That first paycheck brought the opportunity for new life lessons. They opened their own savings accounts. They are responsible for their bank ledgers. They will learn how to reconcile a bank statement.

They will learn the value of the dollar.

My older son wanted to spend his first paycheck immediately. He knew what computer part he wanted to buy.

My younger son had an idea of something he’d like to purchase, but he also wanted to save his paycheck.

It was time to introduce “Save, Spend, Give.”

My parents always taught us to “pay yourself first,” so that’s what I’m teaching my boys. Seventy-five percent of their paycheck went into their savings account. They can buy a car with that money later on, if they can wrap their heads around the fact that this is an investment in their future.

The next part of their paycheck was cashed for spending money. You can decide what percentages work best for your kids and your family. Since 75 percent went into savings, we decided on 20 percent for spending, and the remaining 5 percent goes to giving. Philanthropy is an important value in our family. Whether the money goes to church or to a nonprofit agency, I want them to know that it’s important to give back.

Some families do 40/30/30, and this is great, too! With younger kids, you can use clear jars and actually divide the cash out so that the visual makes an impact on your children.

I hope this lesson will stick with my kids and carry on the very valuable skills they are learning as contributing members of the workforce.



Mi Blog Hispano: El Molcajete


El MolcajeteLa nueva tecnología y aparatos eléctricos se han integrado mucho en nuestros hogares, pero en una familia latina, principalmente mexicana, ¡no suele faltar el molcajete! Esta piedra que es tan cultural y especial les da a las salsas un sabor mejor. Yo recuerdo a mi mama moliendo y mezclando los ingredientes en su molcajete para hacernos esas salsas tan ricas que aun hace.

He preparado salsas en la licuadora y simplemente no me quedan igual que cuando las preparo en el molcajete moliendo con la piedra. Así que, si usted hace sus salsas, pero siente que algo le está faltando al sabor, el secreto está en el molcajete. No me cabe duda.

El molcajete fue diseñado hace miles y miles de años, muchísimo antes que existiera la licuadora. Sus tres patitas realmente son un detalle artístico de los tiempos prehispánicos. La piedra que se usa para moler nos recuerda a lo típico que se usaba para cocinar en esas épocas. El molcajete está hecho principalmente de piedra volcánica. Por eso cuando compre uno nuevo necesita curarlo antes de empezar a usarlo. Para curarlo puede simplemente moler arroz y sal en el molcajete hasta que no le salga polvo de tierra o de piedra. Después lo lava y listo para una rica salsita de molcajete.

Ahora les comparto una receta sencilla y riquísima para hacer en el molcajete. ¡Espero que la disfruten!

Ingredientes:
2 tomates roma
2 chiles serranos
2 ramitas de cilantro
2 dientes de ajo
Sal al gusto

Instrucciones:
Dore los tomates, chiles, y ajo en un comal. Ponga la sal y el ajo en el molcajete y muela. Quite las semillas a los chiles y agréguelos al molcajete junto con el cilantro y siga moliendo. Agregue los tomates y muela a la consistencia que usted quiera. Agregue más sal al gusto. Sirva la salsa directa del molcajete.



Shop the Sale: Onion Latkes


Onion LatkesPrep Time: 15 mins
Cook Time: 30 mins
Serves: 4

Try a new take on the traditional potato latke! This delicious alternative is the perfect appetizer or gourmet party hors d’oeuvre. Skip the usual sour cream and serve with garlic-chive yogurt dip, chipotle aioli, spicy peanut dipping sauce – or all three – for some flavorful pairings.

Ingredients
3/4 cup flour
1 1/2 Tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp seasoning salt
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Freshly cracked black pepper
3/4 cup milk
2 1/2 cups onions, finely diced
1 green onion, finely chopped
Oil, for frying

Instructions
In a large bowl, mix together flour, sugar, baking powder, seasoning salt, cayenne, garlic powder and a small amount of black pepper. Combine well. Add milk; whisk until thoroughly combined. (The batter will be thick.) Add all onions to batter; mix with wooden spoon until combined. (A few lumps are fine, so don’t overmix.)

In a large frying pan, heat about 1/2 inch oil to medium-high, adding more oil as needed while cooking.

Drop batter by the tablespoonful into hot oil. If needed, slide batter off with another spoon. Flatten slightly with spoon or spatula to about 3 to 4 inches in diameter. Fry for 2 to 3 minutes or until golden-brown. Flip and repeat on second side. Drain well on paper towels. Repeat with remaining batter. Serve hot.

Calories Per Serving: 159, Fat: 1 g (1 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 4 mg, Sodium: 900 mg, Carbohydrates: 33 g, Fiber: 2 g, Protein: 5 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

Chef Tips

What Are Latkes?
Latkes are traditional Jewish fried pancakes served at Hanukkah. While latkes are usually made from grated potatoes, these savory, shallow-fried cakes can – and have been – made from various vegetables, legumes and cheese for hundreds of years. Many cultures have their own version of the latke too, from the German kartoffelpuffer to the Korean gamja-jeon.

Don’t Cry Over Chopped Onions…And Other Onion Tips
Oh, onions! We love you, but you make us cry and our hands smell like you all day. Here’s how you can enjoy the flavor without the hassle.

Reduce tearing when cutting onions by chilling them in the freezer 10-15 minutes or in the refrigerator for 30 minutes and leaving the root end intact when chopping.

To remove the smell of onions from your hands, rub them with lemon juice. Note: this also works for “onion breath”, but you need to rinse with equal parts lemon and water (although if you do wish to rub lemon in your mouth, please video that comedy).

Store dry onions in a cool, well-ventilated place. Do not store them in plastic bags. For peeled or chopped onions, store in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 7-10 days.

Or pick up a package of Brookshire’s Shortcuts chopped onions, found in the produce section of your local store!



Healthy Living: Whole 5® Puree


Whole 5® PureeWhen I saw this product on the shelf in the refrigerated section of Brookshire’s in the produce by prepared salads and bagged greens, I figured it was a juice.

It’s not. They’ll be the first to tell you that Whole 5® is a puree in which one serving contains the same antioxidant properties as five servings of blueberries. If you know your health facts, you know that’s a lot.

Whole 5® is not a juice or an energy drink. According to their website, “It is pureed whole food. It is dense nutrition that provides health-giving antioxidants and phytonutrients, plus natural sustained energy without stimulants.”

Whole 5® contains 15 super foods, including (all whole foods) grapes, apples, acai, pomegranates, blueberries, aloe, noni, cranberries, elderberries, bilberries, goji, nopal cactus leaf, plums, carrots and sweet potatoes.

It also contains two herbs: Chinese Skullcap and whole gentian root.

Finally, there are 13 trace minerals essential to overall health, including potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, copper, selenium, chromium, iodine, vanadium, molybdenum and sodium.

Adding an ounce of Whole 5® to your diet each day can give you more energy, help you sleep better, help you fight infection, and help you feel better overall. Recommended use is one ounce in the morning and one ounce in the evening.



Product Talk: Wholly Guacamole® Minis


Wholly Guacamole® Minis“Mom, I need to talk to you about something,” my older son said recently.

“Okay,” I agreed, with slight trepidation.

“I’d like some different fruits and vegetables in my school lunch,” he said.

Phew, that I can do!

I found Wholly Guacamole® Minis at Brookshire’s last week, to his delight.

These small, individually packaged guacamoles are great for his school lunch. I send along carrots, celery, cucumber spears or pita wedges for him to eat with the guacamole. He’s getting a great dose of protein and good fats to keep him alert and full throughout the afternoon. You know how hard that is to accomplish with teenage boys!

Find this product in the refrigerated produce section of Brookshire’s, near the bagged salads.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Page 9 of 248« First...567891011121314...Last »
Copyright © 2010-2017, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS