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Dine-In: Pork Schnitzel


Even people who think they don’t like German and Austrian food usually like schnitzel. It’s pork and it’s fried – what’s not to like?

Actually, the Germans and the Austrians may not have invented schnitzel, which is traditionally a thin, breaded cutlet of meat that’s fried till golden. Most food historians think they borrowed it from a northern Italian dish called milanesa. But, well, pretty much every other culture has a version of this dish, too. (Chicken-fried steak? It’s basically a schnitzel, or milanesa, made with beef, and then covered with gravy.)

Although in Europe schnitzel is often made with veal, I prefer pork, because it’s easy to get and inexpensive. This is a good weeknight meal because it cooks so fast; the thinner you pound the meat, the faster it cooks. Serve it with mashed potatoes and a green vegetable or salad, or with German potato salad and cooked cabbage if you want to go the traditional European route.

Schnitzel
Serves 4

Ingredients:
2 cups unseasoned bread crumbs
1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
2 large eggs
2 cups+ 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 pork tenderloin (1 1/4 pounds). trimmed of fat and silver skin and cut on angle into 4 equal pieces
Salt and pepper, to taste

Garnish:
1 lemon, cut into wedges
2 tablespoons parsley, fresh chopped
2 tablespoons capers, rinsed (optional)

Directions:
Place bread crumbs to shallow dish. Spread flour in second shallow dish. Beat eggs with 1 tablespoon oil in third shallow dish.

Place one piece of pork cut-side down inside a large plastic freezer bag and pound to even thickness, until cutlet is between 1/8 and 1/4 inch thick. Repeat with remaining pieces of pork. Season cutlets with salt and pepper.

Working with 1 cutlet at a time, dredge cutlets thoroughly in flour, shaking off excess, then coat with egg mixture, allowing excess to drip back into dish to ensure very thin coating, and coat evenly with bread crumbs, pressing on crumbs to adhere. Place breaded cutlets in single layer on wire rack set over baking sheet; let coating dry 5 minutes.

Heat remaining 2 cups oil in large Dutch oven over medium-high heat until it registers 375 degrees on instant-read thermometer. Lay 2 cutlets, without overlapping, in pan and cook, shaking pan continuously and gently, until cutlets are wrinkled and light golden brown on both sides, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer cutlets to paper towel-lined plate and flip cutlets several times to blot excess oil. Repeat with remaining cutlets. Serve immediately with garnishes.

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Posted in: Cooking, Dine In


Family Matters: Homemade Ornaments


Does it feel like the holidays rush by every year, and they’re over before you’ve even had a chance to relax and enjoy them?

This year, make a promise to slow down and create some special holiday memories with your family – in the kitchen, of course. These old-fashioned dough ornaments are fun for the whole family to make, and easy enough that even the littlest kids can get in on the act. Double or triple the recipe and you’ll have enough dough to invite friends, neighbors and cousins for an ornament-making party. While the ornaments are baking, serve hot chocolate and play board games, and create memories that will last a lifetime.

The basic dough recipe is below, but you can find illustrated step-by-step directions in the December issue of Celebrate Cooking. You can pick up your free copy at your local store, or view the digital edition online at brookshires.com.

Happy holidays to you and yours!

Dough Ornaments

Ingredients:
4 cups Food Club Flour
1 cup Food Club salt
1 1/2 cups warm water
Red and green food coloring

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Combine all ingredients in large mixing bowl. Turn dough onto floured surface and knead by hand until elastic and smooth.

Divide dough into roughly three equal pieces. Leave one portion white. In the other two portions, work in red and green food coloring by kneading,  adding color until you reach the desired hue.

Roll small pieces of dough into long, thin ropes and twist together to form candy canes and wreaths. Hand-cut small bows of red or green dough to decorate wreaths. Place ornaments on parchment-lined cookie sheets and bake until hard, about one hour.



Shop the sale: Brookshire’s Best Angus chuck roast


If you’ve never tried our Brookshire’s Best Angus beef, this is the week to treat yourself. We’ve got our Brookshire’s Best Angus chuck roast on special starting today.

Angus cattle are often called the Cadillac of the beef world, and the nickname actually makes a lot of sense:  Raised with careful quality control, American-ranched Angus cattle produce superior cuts of tender, juicy beef. It’s considered some of the best in the business.

And our Brookshire’s Best Angus beef is the best of the best. We select only the highest-quality Angus beef for this program, so you are guaranteed a consistently tender, delicious cut.

What makes Angus such good beef?

It starts with genetics. American ranchers have been raising Angus cattle for more than 100 years, after the first Angus were brought here from their native Scotland in the 1870s. These Angus cattle have been bred to produce beef that is finely marbled, meaning the fat is well-distributed throughout the muscle, so that the meat cooks up juicy and tender.

And it continues through production and selection. The Angus beef we choose for our Brookshire’s Best line comes from ranches following high standards of feeding and care, so that their beef is consistently of the highest quality.

Finally, this beef is hand-cut, the old-fashioned way.

It all adds up to a cut of beef that’s not just good; it’s seriously good.



Healthy Living: National Diabetes Month


November is American Diabetes Month, and last week in this space, my colleague, pharmacist Dr. Charlotte Weller, shared some important news about health care for those who are living with diabetes. But as a nutrition specialist, I see that many people are very unfamiliar with this all-too-common disease, and are not aware of the steps they can take to make sure they do not develop it.

Because many cases of diabetes can be prevented with proper nutrition and exercise, I think it’s important to review the basic facts of this disease, with help from information from the Centers for Disease Control.

Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes affects 8.3% of the U.S. population, resulting in 2.8 million Americans suffering from diabetes. There are 3 types of diabetes; type 1 (5% of cases), type2 (90% to 95% of cases) and gestational.

Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile-onset diabetes, occurs when the only cells in the body that produce insulin, pancreatic beta cells, are destroyed. This can be due to an autoimmune disorder, genetics or environment. Insulin is required to help regulate the level of glucose in your blood. Insulin transport glucose into the cells through special receptors. Once the beta cells are destroyed, your body is unable to produce insulin resulting in glucose remaining in the blood. People suffering from type 1 diabetes receive insulin from an insulin pump or insulin injections. Type 1 diabetes is not currently preventable, but can be controlled.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not use insulin properly. This can occur due to a number of factors, including age, lifestyle, family history, and race/ethnicity. Changes in lifestyle, like eating healthy and regularly exercising, can delay and even prevent type 2 diabetes.  A clinical study, the Diabetes Prevention Program, monitored a group of people who had a high risk of developing diabetes. After three years, the participants who increased their amount of exercise and lost weight were 58% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

Gestational diabetes occurs among 2% to 10% of pregnant women. Five to ten percent of women with gestational diabetes were found to be diabetic after the pregnancy.

How do you know? Type 2 diabetes, especially, sometimes goes undetected for too long because the early symptoms can be vague or may seem minor. Symptoms may include increased thirst, hunger and urination; fatigue; blurred vision; tingling in the feet; and unexplained weight loss. If you are over the age of 45, the American Diabetes Association suggests you have regular screenings for pre-diabetes and diabetes. Additionally, regular screenings are also suggested for those who are under 45 but who are overweight or obese and also have other risk factors, such as a family history of diabetes.

Help educate the ones you love.

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Posted in: Healthy Living


Product Talk: Brown Rice


As food writer Mark Bittman put it in The New York Times earlier this month – Brown rice isn’t just for hippies anymore.

But I’m willing to bet that most of you don’t eat it very often – or at all. If you don’t, you really ought to try it, not just for a change of pace but because in most cases it really is a better choice, nutrition-wise. It has more fiber and more minerals than white rice, and slightly fewer calories.

Brown rice is simply the less-refined cousin of refined white rice. (Brown rice can be any kind, including exotics like jasmine or sushi rice, but the kinds that are easiest to find are short-, medium-, or long-grain rices.)

During processing, only the outer, inedible hull is removed. The bran and the germ, which are stripped out of refined rice, remain behind in brown rice. That makes brown rice one of those whole grains we’re all advised to eat more often, and gives the clear health advantage to brown rice:

  • On average, brown rice has about four times as much fiber as white – 4 grams of fiber per cup of brown rice, compared to less than one for most varieties of white rice.
  • Brown rice has much higher levels of such nutrients as manganese, iron, selenium, and many B vitamins. While some of these nutrients are added back into enriched white rice, many of the minerals are not.
  • Brown rice gets a NuVal score of 82. Enriched white rice is scored about 30 points lower. (Remember, the higher the NuVal score, the better the overall nutrition of the product.)
  • A study by Harvard researchers indicated that eating brown rice regularly may even help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Convinced yet? You might be if you try some, as long as you don’t compare it to the white rice you’re used to. Brown rice has a nutty flavor and a chewier, heavier texture; it may remind you more of a whole grain like barley, quinoa or even oatmeal.

Simply served plain, yes, brown rice can be a little boring. So incorporate it in other dishes: Serve it as a base for chili or stir-fries; cook it in chicken or beef stock instead of plain water; substitute it for white rice in your favorite pilaf recipe.

And if you’re in a hurry, or intimidated by cooking something new, try one of the faster-cooking or microwave varieties that have hit supermarkets in recent years. Regular brown rice does take much longer to cook than typical white rice, but some of these newer products can be ready in as little as a couple of minutes. So you really have no excuse not to give one a try.

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Posted in: Product Talk


Family Matters: Gerber’s squeezable fruits & veggies


If you are the parent or grandparent of a toddler, you know these two things about their eating habits:

  • They want to do it themselves.
  • And their version of “doing it themselves” often involves getting more of the food on their hair, clothes, and chair than into their little bellies.

So here is a way they can achieve their first objective, without you having to clean up the second one: Gerber’s new Graduates Grabbers . These  squeezable, healthy fruits and vegetables come in a pouch that’s easy for little ones to handle themselves.

The new foods, just widely available this fall, come in five flavors. Many children will think they’re getting a juice pouch – but you’ll  know they’re really getting real, pureed fruit and vegetables. In fact, those of you who are always trying to get your kids to eat more vegetables will be pleased to note that, unlike many other pouch products, two of these flavors include veggies in the mix. (The flavors include Banana Blueberry; Apple, Pear & Peach; Apple & Sweet Potato with Cinnamon; Pear & Squash; and Apple, Mango & Strawberry.)

The contents of each pouch are made with 100 percent natural produce, and without any fake colors or flavors. There’s no extra sugar or salt added, either. Each contains two servings of pureed fruit and/or vegetables, and a good helping of Vitamins E and C.

The pouch is smartly designed, too. It’s just the right size to fit in little hands, but the twist-off cap is large enough that it does not present a choking hazard, a potential problem with some brands of pureed foods geared to toddlers. And they will fit nicely into diaper bag or backpack when you’re running out and would like to take a snack beyond Cheerios.

As with any food, you’ll want to supervise your child while they eat a Grabber. But thanks to this self-contained packaging and the child-friendly flavors, you don’t have to worry so much that your child will end up wearing their snack instead of eating it.



Shop the sale: Community Coffee


If you’re a fan of good coffee, you probably already know Community® Coffee, now on sale at Brookshire’s, just in time to let you stock up for holiday guests. The Louisiana-based brand, sold in the familiar red packages, roasts only the highest-quality Arabica beans, so the bright, smooth flavor of the coffee really shines through.

But you may not know the rich tradition behind this business – still family-owned after more than 90 years.

Community Coffee traces its beginnings to 1919, when founder Henry Norman “Cap”  Saurage began brewing coffee in his country store on the edge of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He bought beans from local roasters but mixed them according to his tastes, creating an exceptionally smooth, flavorful blend.

Soon, the coffee became more popular than the groceries, and in 1924, Cap went into the coffee business full-time, turning a backyard barn into a coffee mill. He called his coffee  “Community” because of the support he received from his beloved neighborhood.

From there, business boomed. In the early 1940s, Community Coffee began roasting its own beans, and by 1955, it began importing green coffee beans from coffee plantations in South America – ensuring that its high standards of quality would be upheld from point of origin to the consumer’s coffee cup. And the company has continued to innovate. They were the first U.S. coffee company to introduce the now-ubiquitous vacuum-sealed coffee package, way back in 1980. And, going back to their roots, they launched their first coffeehouse, CC’s Community Coffee House®, in 1995.

With all of its flavors and roasts, Community Coffee continues to follow the vision it embraced for itself nearly a century ago: Make the best coffee possible, and share it with consumers. That’s why they use only the highest-quality Arabica beans. Grown at higher altitudes, Arabica beans are more flavorful and contain less caffeine than the lower-quality Robusta beans, which are used in many other commercial grades of coffee.

The fourth generation of the Saurage family now owns and operates Community Coffee, so popular that it’s unofficially called the state coffee of Louisiana. Since they know a little something about food and drink in Louisiana, I think that’s a pretty big honor.

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Posted in: Shop the Sale


Healthy Living: Diabetic Foot Care


November is Diabetes Awareness Month, so let’s take a few minutes to learn more about better foot care for those living with diabetes.

For someone with diabetes, careful tending to the feet is very important. Even small injuries to the foot such as a minor cut can produce serious consequences.  Diabetes may cause nerve damage that can take away the feeling in your feet, making those small injuries go unnoticed.  Diabetes may also reduce the blood flow to the feet, making it harder to heal injuries or resist infection.  An infection or non-healing wound could put you at risk for an amputation.  To avoid these serious complication of diabetes follow these guidelines when caring for your feet.

Inspect your feet daily.  Check for cuts, blisters, redness, swelling, or nail problems.  Use a magnifying hand mirror to look at the bottom of your feet.  Call your doctor if you notice anything.

Wash your feet in lukewarm (not hot) water.  Keep your feet clean by washing them daily.  Use only lukewarm water – the temperature that you would use on a newborn baby.

Be gentle when bathing your feet.  Wash feet with a soft washcloth or sponge.  Dry by blotting or patting, and always carefully dry between the toes.

Moisturize your feet – but not between your toes.  Use a moisturizer daily to keep dry skin from itching or cracking.  But DO NOT moisturize between the toes. Doing so could encourage a fungal infection.

Cut nails carefully.  Always cut nails straight across and file the edges.  Don’t cut nails too short, as this could lead to ingrown toe nails.  If you have concerns or questions about your nails, your doctor is a good source of information.

Never treat corns or calluses yourself.  Always visit your doctor for treatment.

Wear clean, dry socks.  Change them daily.

Avoid the wrong type of socks.  Avoid tight elastic bands which can reduce circulation.  Don’t wear thick or bulky socks (they can fit poorly and irritate the skin.)

Wear socks to bed.  If your feet get cold at night, wear socks.  NEVER use a heating pad or hot water bottle.

Shake out your shoes and feel the inside before wearing.  Remember, your feet may not be able to feel a pebble or other foreign object, so always inspect your shoes before putting them on.

Keep your feet warm and dry.  Don’t let your feet get wet in snow or rain.  Wear warm socks and shoes in winter.

Never walk barefoot.  Not even at home.  Always wear shoes or slippers.  You could step on something and get a scratch or cut.

Take care of your diabetes.  Keep your blood sugar levels under control.

Don’t smoke.  Smoking restricts the blood flow in your feet.

Get periodic foot exams.  In addition to daily foot inspections at home, it is important to see your foot and ankle doctor on a regular basis.  This will help prevent the foot complications of diabetes.

While feet may not be the prettiest or most popular part of our body, their care plays an important role in our overall health.  Take the time to pamper them!

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Posted in: Healthy Living


Product Talk: Pomelos


If you’ve noticed the giant, greenish pomelos in the produce department, you may have just thought these citrus fruits were just freakishly large, unripened grapefruit.

Actually, the pomelo is just a distant cousin of the grapefruit – but you may find you like them even better.  Most people will find them juicier, sweeter and milder than most grapefruit.

In fact, if it weren’t for pomelos, we probably wouldn’t even have grapefruit today. Pomelos (sometimes called “pummelos” ) are native to southeast Asia, and were particularly common in  Malaysia, Indonesia and southern China, even as far back as thousands of years ago.

According to the authoritative Oxford Companion to Food, food historians believe that sailors brought pomelos to the Carribbean West Indies in the 17th century. There, they were cultivated, cross-bred and refined until the modern grapefruit was produced.

Only in the last few years have pomelos been common in U.S. supermarkets again. Maybe that’s because of appearances: The pomelo does look like an ungainly stepsister to more common, petite citrus fruits. Its skin is usually green or yellowish-green, and slightly rough.  Pomelos are usually at least an inch or two larger in diameter than even the largest grapefruit.

The skin, or rind, is also very thick and soft, with a thick white pith. Rather than eating it on the half-shell like a grapefruit, it’s easier to eat a pomelo like an orange, by peeling away the rind and separating the fruit into sections. The flesh doesn’t have the tart edge of a grapefruit or the high acidity of other citrus fruits.

You can use pomelo in just about the same way as you would a grapefruit, in a salad or by itself. Peak season is now through late winter.



Dine-In: Pumpkin Pudding


I love pumpkin! On cool fall mornings, I enjoy a warm pumpkin spice latté, and on Thanksgiving, you’d better be prepared to fight me for the last piece of pumpkin pie.

What can you not like about pumpkin when it has a NuVal score of 94! (That’s just six points away from the perfect NuVal score of 100, meaning it’s about a nutritious a food as you can get.) One cup of pumpkin has 763% of your daily recommendation of vitamin A.  Vitamin A not only helps fight infections, but it helps prevent night blindness and contributes to red blood cell production, growth and development. Pumpkin is also a good source of vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin E, iron, potassium and fiber.

When Thanksgiving rolls around, skip the 316 calories, 14 grams of fat and 5 grams of saturated fat in a slice of pumpkin pie and go for a lower-fat pumpkin treat. This year, I’ve been asked to make this pudding instead of the traditional pie. Serve this pumpkin pudding over crushed gingersnaps and you won’t even miss your pumpkin pie.  

Easy Pumpkin Pie Pudding
Prep Time: 15 minutes, plus refrigerating
Serves: 8

Ingredients:
2 (1.34 oz) boxes Food Club Sugar Free Instant Vanilla Pudding
4 cups Full Circle Fat Free Milk
1 cup Food Club Canned Pumpkin
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup Food Club Fat Free Whipped Topping
1/4 cup pecan, chopped

Directions:
In a large bowl prepare pudding with milk. In a medium bowl, mix together pumpkin and pumpkin pie spice. Fold pumpkin into pudding. Spoon filling into glasses. Refrigerate glasses for 1 hour. Garnish with whipped topping and pecans.

Nutritional Information: Calories per Serving: 114, Fat: 3 g (0 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 2 mg, Sodium: 496 mg, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Fiber: 1 g, Protein: 5 g

© 2011, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

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