share. The Brookshire's Blog

Healthy Living: Five Foods


I was looking through my folder of interesting articles and ran across an old one from Woman’s Day Magazine (July 2007, to be exact) called “The Five Most Underrated Foods.”  These are foods that don’t get the credit they deserve for being healthy.

So what are those 5 underrated foods?

 

  1. Strawberries: one cup has more vitamin C than an orange, plus fiber to help maintain blood sugar levels.
  2. Eggs: Eggs are great sources of choline (good for brain health) and protein, and the dietary cholesterol in eggs has been shown to not damage blood cholesterol levels significantly.
  3. Salmon: All fish are high in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids but salmon has one of the highest levels.
  4. Avocados: They’re loaded with fat, but it’s the good-for-you monosaturated fat that can actually help reduce your bad cholesterol numbers.
  5. Kiwi: Two or three kiwi a day can help reduce blood clotting, which is a factor in heart attacks. Kiwi is also rich in fiber, which is important to protect against heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

I’m happy to say that I love all five of the five underrated foods. How about you?



Healthy Living: Eat Well!


If you’re new to diabetes, you may feel like your life is suddenly full of CAN’Ts: I can’t have this, I can’t do that….and it’s frustrating. Actually, though, your diabetes diagnosis can be a moment of empowerment. By changing your diet, you’ll be declaring your intent to become healthy—and what’s more awesome than that?

In many regards, a diabetic diet is really just a HEALTHY diet. You’ll be eating pure, natural, wholesome great foods—and that’s something everyone would be smart to consider! Instead of a chicken-fried steak smothered in cream gravy, enjoy a pan-grilled chicken breast, steamed broccoli and a salad—and know that you’re being a positive role model to EVERYONE, not just diabetics. This is a healthy diet that benefits everyone!

Diabetics need to take care to balance carbohydrates throughout the day—that’s crucial. But diabetics don’t need to eat special, exotic foods. If it’s wholesome and healthy, it’s probably okay for a diabetic diet. Bread and desserts are part of that diet as well! Talk with your doctor and your dietician and you’ll find that what you CAN eat is actually what we all SHOULD be eating every day.



Product Talk: School Supplies


Now that school is well underway, you and your children have most likely settled into a routine. It’s amazing how that routine flows pretty smoothly until a sudden disruption throws life into chaos. How often do you get the last-minute news that your child needs to turn in a special project the next day? Maybe it’s the science club volcano or the map of Peru….but regardless, when that call goes out for the super-duper project, it’s the parents who snap to attention and make it all happen. 

The next time you’re on special-project alert, stop by our stores and see what materials we have to help you and your child come out on top. And to get the jump on those last-minute assignments, you can stock up while you’re picking up groceries. A pair of scissors, some poster board, colored pencils and report folders….they’re all right here. Won’t your young student be surprised when you calmly pull out the supplies, instead of panicking? Hey, that’s what parents are for!

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Posted in: Kids, Product Talk


Up Close and Personal With Martha!!!


What an amazing day in the Big Apple!!! We had a brief celebrity sighting at brunch this morning of Harvey Keitel, but nothing compares to the sighting I have right now…..we’re in the 3rd row from Martha Stewart’s kitchen stage!!! We are so close, we could almost reach out and touch her!

She’s cooking out of her brand new cookbook (sadly it isn’t available until next week) called Martha Stewart’s Dinner at Home, which features 52 full menus for 52 full dinners, covering all courses and offering a fairly healthy selection. This cookbook sounds like it will make your families happy and your friends ecstatic. I can’t wait to pick up a copy!

Okay, on the menu tonight is…..are you ready…..duck breast with carmelized onions and fig jam, braised red cabbage, grated potato cake (like a pancake) and a most scrumptious and heavenly hot fudge hazelnut (aka filbert) sundae. Oohhh, I bet Goldenbrook Farms Ice Cream would make this sundae taste even better! Martha says this would be her last meal.

Oh, and she says iron skillets are a must in the kitchen. And she craves daiquiris…who knew?? She’s got a really funny personality.

I wonder if Martha would want to come cook for me every week….yeah, I know, I’ll keep dreaming!

You wouldn’t believe how wonderful this room smells!

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Posted in: Cooking


Dine In: Bring the All-Night Diner Home!


What is there about an all-night diner that is so exciting? IHOP, Denny’s or the neighborhood greasy spoon: it’s magical to eat scrambled eggs any time of the day or night. 

You can bring the all-night-diner feel home, and save a big chunk of change while you’re at it! Breakfast for Dinner is an all-American favorite and our sales this week will help you make it all happen. Right on the front page: Food Club eggs. You can’t beat the price! And right beside is Pillsbury Cinnamon Rolls. All you need to do is cook up some bacon and pour the orange juice!

Super-Easy, Elegant Omelet
Serves 2
Prep time: 10 minutes

4 eggs
2 Tbs milk or water
½ cup shredded cheese
Salt and pepper to taste 

With a fork, lightly scramble the eggs with the milk. Pour mixture into a piping hot, nonstick pan. Immediately reduce the heat to medium. As the mixture starts to firm around the edges, gently swirl the pan to allow more egg to reach the surface, lifting up the edges to let egg run into the pan. When nearly firm, sprinkle the cheese over the surface. Using a spatula, fold the omelet in half. Continue cooking a minute longer and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Slide onto a plate and cut in half.

Note: use your favorite additional cooked ingredients to customize your omelet.

Nutritional Information:
Calories Per Serving: 248,   Fat: 14 g (7 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 403 mg, Sodium: 304 mg, Carbohydrates: 2 g, Fiber: 0 g, Protein: 18 g.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.

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Posted in: Cooking, Dine In


Family Matters: Take ‘Em Along!


Do you dread taking your kids along to the grocery store? I have to admit, it’s always easier when I’m alone, and I definitely stick to my list better when there’s nobody else along to sneak forbidden foods into the buggy. But what about when there’s no choice and the kid(s) will be joining you? Don’t groan; you CAN make this work!

And of course, the key element is to plan ahead. Sometime, totally unrelated to the shopping trip, gather a few tools that will make grocery trips more do-able. Depending on the age of your children, maybe you can make up a bingo card of items to spot in the store; maybe you can have your child match up coupons with products; younger children can help make veggie choices—like broccoli over carrots, or red grapes instead of green. Kids are great at matching colors—even the youngest child can help you look for the reddest bell pepper, or the largest beet.

Does your child pester for treats and candy? How about making a coupon, one per child; once they find what they want, they redeem their coupon to you, and that’s it. Whenever they see a great potential snack item, you can ask your children if they feel this is the best choice for their coupon….often they’ll reconsider!

In short, the success of your shopping trip will depend on a positive attitude all around, as brief a trip as possible, and if you know of any trouble areas (the candy aisle, perhaps?), discuss them before you ever enter the store.

Grocery shopping with kids is a great educational opportunity. You can learn about fractions, budgets, prioritizing, nutrition and making change. It really is worth it!



Family Matters: My Baby Spits Up!


Almost every baby spits up from time to time. It usually happens because a baby’s digestive system is still developing. The muscle that keeps foods in the stomach may not  close tightly when babies are young. As a result, it’s easy for a baby’s most recent meal to splash back up, so be prepared to do a few extra loads of laundry for a few months!

Usually spit up is nothing to worry about. Talk with your doctor, and if your baby is gaining the proper amount of weight and is thriving, you can be confident that he’s getting enough to eat. Another strong sign that your baby is well fed is having six to 10 wet diapers a day. To reduce spitting up, try feeding your baby only when she shows signs of hunger, keep him in a semi-upright position during feeding, and burp him regularly throughout the meal.

Sometimes, however, lots of spitting up is a sign of a serious condition, so it’s important to discuss this with your doctor. If a baby is not gaining weight, is crying excessively, is choking or seems to be in a lot of pain, he may have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) which your doctor can diagnose. Fortunately, most children outgrow spitting up by the time they’re a year old.



Shop the Sale: Boneless Rump Roast


It’s that time of year. It’s stew weather, soup weather and roast weather. As soon as it gets just a little chilly, all those hearty meals sound really, really good. How about a super-easy way to give your family the memories you had as a kid—or the memories you wish you’d had? Check out this week’s Brookshire’s circular (online or in print). Right on the front page, you’ll find the perfect cool-weather dinner idea.

Pot roast. It’s a dinnertime staple from back in the days when everybody’s mom had lots of time to cook. You can still do a pot roast, you know. If you have 10 minutes in the morning (or even the night before) you can get it ready to put in the slow cooker. If you have a block of time on a weekend afternoon, you can throw it in the oven and have it ready for supper. Either way, this dish is about as easy as it gets.

Back in the 1960s, housewives discovered that Lipton’s Onion Soup mix made a fantastic base for cooking roasts. And you know what? It still works in 2009. It’s this simple: Place the roast in a baking pan (or slow cooker). Surround with roast-friendly vegetables, such as chunks of carrots, potatoes, celery, sweet potato and onion. Sprinkle one envelope of onion soup over everything and then pour 2 cups of water over top. Cover and cook. For a slow cooker, that would be all day; in the oven, it would be 1.5 to 2 hours at 350°F.

If you’d rather not have the sodium that comes in dry soup mix, you can substitute beef broth.

The meat is fall-apart tender, the cooking juices make the most divine gravy (thickened or not) and the veggies create a picture of Americana that has been all but forgotten. Leftovers (if you have any) make great sandwiches and freeze well.



Healthy Living: A Gluten-Free Lifestyle & Bread… Sigh.


When you start eating a gluten-free diet, once you learn the basics, it’s really not that difficult. Most of your favorite foods will have a suitable alternative. But the one food that is really hard to prepare gluten free is…..bread. And that makes sense! If the main ingredient of bread (wheat flour) is something you can’t have, it’s going to be hard to duplicate it!

Oh, you’ll find gluten-free bread, all right, but many of the choices are pretty sad. One of the key concepts is to warm up your GF bread. Store-bought, gluten-free bread often tastes terrible at room temperature. Keep the bread frozen, and then toast it or microwave it a slice at a time, as needed.

There are recipes to re-create bread in a gluten-free format. There are also mixes. Many of these methods require a lot of exotic ingredients and long procedures. It’s worth it, though, just to sink your teeth into a chewy slice of bread once again!

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Posted in: Healthy Living


Healthy Living: Swine Flu & Diabetics


The H1N1 virus, commonly called swine flu, is spreading. Here’s the good news: Being diabetic does not put you at greater risk for catching the flu. And here’s the bad news: if you do catch the flu, as a diabetic, you’re more likely to face complications.

Since having diabetes puts you in a high-risk group, you should try to get the flu shot—both the standard flu shot and the one for H1N1, when available. If the worst happens and you do come down with the flu, be sure to let your health care providers and family know. They’ll want to monitor you for dangerous developments.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), it’s important for diabetics to keep their insulin going. Continue taking your medications, even if you can’t eat. Merely having the flu will raise your blood glucose levels, and irregular eating can make that even worse. Monitor your blood glucose levels more than you usually would, and if your numbers start to change, notify your doctor right away.

For most people, getting the flu means a week of uncomfortable misery. Diabetic patients face greater risks and complications—so it’s not something to take lightly. Work hard to prevent it, and if you do get the flu, contact your doctor.

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Posted in: Healthy Living


Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

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