share. The Brookshire's Blog

Shop the Sale: Boneless Rump Roast


It’s that time of year. It’s stew weather, soup weather and roast weather. As soon as it gets just a little chilly, all those hearty meals sound really, really good. How about a super-easy way to give your family the memories you had as a kid—or the memories you wish you’d had? Check out this week’s Brookshire’s circular (online or in print). Right on the front page, you’ll find the perfect cool-weather dinner idea.

Pot roast. It’s a dinnertime staple from back in the days when everybody’s mom had lots of time to cook. You can still do a pot roast, you know. If you have 10 minutes in the morning (or even the night before) you can get it ready to put in the slow cooker. If you have a block of time on a weekend afternoon, you can throw it in the oven and have it ready for supper. Either way, this dish is about as easy as it gets.

Back in the 1960s, housewives discovered that Lipton’s Onion Soup mix made a fantastic base for cooking roasts. And you know what? It still works in 2009. It’s this simple: Place the roast in a baking pan (or slow cooker). Surround with roast-friendly vegetables, such as chunks of carrots, potatoes, celery, sweet potato and onion. Sprinkle one envelope of onion soup over everything and then pour 2 cups of water over top. Cover and cook. For a slow cooker, that would be all day; in the oven, it would be 1.5 to 2 hours at 350°F.

If you’d rather not have the sodium that comes in dry soup mix, you can substitute beef broth.

The meat is fall-apart tender, the cooking juices make the most divine gravy (thickened or not) and the veggies create a picture of Americana that has been all but forgotten. Leftovers (if you have any) make great sandwiches and freeze well.



Healthy Living: A Gluten-Free Lifestyle & Bread… Sigh.


When you start eating a gluten-free diet, once you learn the basics, it’s really not that difficult. Most of your favorite foods will have a suitable alternative. But the one food that is really hard to prepare gluten free is…..bread. And that makes sense! If the main ingredient of bread (wheat flour) is something you can’t have, it’s going to be hard to duplicate it!

Oh, you’ll find gluten-free bread, all right, but many of the choices are pretty sad. One of the key concepts is to warm up your GF bread. Store-bought, gluten-free bread often tastes terrible at room temperature. Keep the bread frozen, and then toast it or microwave it a slice at a time, as needed.

There are recipes to re-create bread in a gluten-free format. There are also mixes. Many of these methods require a lot of exotic ingredients and long procedures. It’s worth it, though, just to sink your teeth into a chewy slice of bread once again!

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Healthy Living


Healthy Living: Swine Flu & Diabetics


The H1N1 virus, commonly called swine flu, is spreading. Here’s the good news: Being diabetic does not put you at greater risk for catching the flu. And here’s the bad news: if you do catch the flu, as a diabetic, you’re more likely to face complications.

Since having diabetes puts you in a high-risk group, you should try to get the flu shot—both the standard flu shot and the one for H1N1, when available. If the worst happens and you do come down with the flu, be sure to let your health care providers and family know. They’ll want to monitor you for dangerous developments.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), it’s important for diabetics to keep their insulin going. Continue taking your medications, even if you can’t eat. Merely having the flu will raise your blood glucose levels, and irregular eating can make that even worse. Monitor your blood glucose levels more than you usually would, and if your numbers start to change, notify your doctor right away.

For most people, getting the flu means a week of uncomfortable misery. Diabetic patients face greater risks and complications—so it’s not something to take lightly. Work hard to prevent it, and if you do get the flu, contact your doctor.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Healthy Living


Product Talk: Pacifiers


Back when you and I were babies, there wasn’t much variety when it came to pacifiers. Nowadays, though, there’s just about any option you want to consider: orthodontically shaped ones that help tooth and jaw development, flavored ones that please the palate, color-coordinated passies that match outfits (don’t forget the matching pacifier clip!), and even models that automatically close when dropped (to control germs).

With all those choices, what’s a parent to do? Despite the many options in pacifiers in 2009, it still all comes down to one main factor: what does your baby like? Each baby has individual preferences and if they spit out the pacifier, it isn’t going to do much good, now, is it? Finding the perfect passie is going to take some trial and effort, and once you find it, take a tip from an experienced mom: buy lots of them! The last thing you need is to have a fussy baby and no pacifier in sight.

Did you know that pacifiers actually come in sizes? There’s one size for newborns, another for ages 6 to 18 months and one for babies older than 18 months. When selecting a pacifier, think of your baby’s safety, also. The best models are one piece, with the nipple and base firmly attached. If you get a pacifier with several parts, it could come apart and pose a choking hazard.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Baby, Product Talk


Party List and Tips


Suggested Serving Quantities

Most of our entertainment trays provide estimates as to how many people they will serve.

However, taking your guests’ appetites into consideration, this guide will help you calculate how much food to serve: 

 

Per Person:

Appetizers 4 to 5 per hour
Fruit and vegetables 1/2 to 2/3 cup
Meat, poultry and fish 4 to 8 ounces
Side dishes 1/2 cup per dish
Sauces, dips and dressings 2 to 3 tablespoons


Brookshire’s Party Shopping Check List

__ Plastic utensils

__ Paper/plastic plates and glasses

__ Paper napkins, disposable tablecloths

__ Paper towels

__ Disposable baking and roasting pans

__ Nuts, chips, pretzels, dips

__ Candy, mints

__ Cookies, cakes, pies

__ Deli items: cheese, meat

__ Bakery items: breads, rolls, muffins, decorated cakes, specialty items

__ Service meats: special order meat, seafood or other entrees

__ Floral items: arrangements, corsages, bouquets, centerpieces

__ Beverages: soda, coffee, tea, bottled water, mixers, beer, wine

__ Candles, matches

A Few More Things to Remember

  • If you provide background music, be sure it’s soft and inviting.
  • A manageable sit-down dinner party size is 6 to 12 guests. Consider how many can sit at your table without bumping elbows.
  • To remove red wine stains, blot up as much as possible with an absorbent cloth. Saturate the stain with club soda or plain water. Later, apply a paste of three parts baking soda to one part water. Let dry, then vacuum.
  • Do your shopping three to four days in advance, except for vegetables, fresh fish and flowers.
  • If you’re having a buffet-style gathering, be sure to have plenty of coasters, napkins and paper towels available. People will need to put down their glasses, and may even spill a few!
| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Entertaining


Setting the Scene


Most gatherings are informal, and place settings reflect a more casual attitude. Try your best not to crowd table settings, because that’s when spills and accidents happen. And keep floral arrangements low, so that conversation isn’t blocked. Some other guidelines include:

Allow two feet from the center of one dinner plate to the center of the next plate. If a buffet service means there are no plates on the table, a napkin can be put in the center of each setting. View a simple napkin fold.

  • Silver goes in “outside in” order. Guest reach for first-used tools on the outside edge of place setting and work their way inside the arrangement. The salad fork goes to the left of the dinner fork, or example.
  • Put two knives to the plate’s right. The outside knife is used first.
  • Soup spoons, if needed, are set on the table to the right of the knives.
  • Only provide butter knives if you’re putting out butter or bread plates in the 11:00 position.
  • Salad plate goes on top of the dinner plate, in the center of each setting.
  • Desert spoon and fork are laid on the table at dinner plate’s top.
  • Put the water glass at 2:00 position to dinner plate and any wine glasses to its right. The outside glass will be your champagne flute if champagne is served.

 

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Entertaining


Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS