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Shop the sale: Chili fixins’

No food says “fall” quite like chili. So this week, we’re making it easy for you to whip up a warm, comforting chili supper. We’ve got all the fixins’ on sale this week at your neighborhood Brookshires – including chili meat, Food Club canned tomatoes, Jiffy corn bread mix, and two famous chili kits that make it easy to make a great pot of chili.

Both of these kits  – Wick Fowler’s Two-Alarm Chili Kit and Carroll Shelby’s Original Texas Chili Kit – contain all the pre-measured spices you need, and let you make it as hot or mild as you dare. They both make a darned good pot of chili. And both kits have a pretty good story attached.

Wick Fowler’s Two-Alarm Chili Kit: The late Wick Fowler was a distinguished Texas newspaperman – he was a foreign correspondent during World War II  – but he became most famous for his chili and the chili-cooking competition he helped found in West Texas.

Back in the 1960s, Texas newspaper columnist Frank Tolbert began writing frequently about Texas chili and founded something called the Chili Appreciation Society. Fowler, quite the chili cook, joined the cause, and in 1967 he competed in the first World Championship Chili Cookoff in Terlingua  in far west Texas.  His recipe is now reproduced in the seasoning kit sold under Fowler’s name.

The Terlingua chili cookoff was mostly a goof by Fowler, Tolbert and friends, but it had staying power. Now called the Original Terlingua International Frank X. Tolbert – Wick Fowler Championship Chili Cookoff, it celebrates its 45th year in November, and has even spawned a second “world championship” chili cookoff in the ghost town of Terlingua. More than 10,000 chiliheads usually attend.

Carroll Shelby’s Original Texas Chili Kit: To most people, Shelby is known for his career as a car designer and driver – he created the classic ‘60s muscle car that’s now known to collectors as the Shelby Mustang. But the native Texan had a lesser-known hobby  of cooking chili.

He helped Fowler, Tolbert and other friends launch the first Terlingua championship, and later turned his own recipe into the kit that bears his name today. The company has since been sold, however, and Shelby is no longer associated with it personally. Still, the easy-to-use kit makes a nice, spicy bowl of red.

Chicken Pot Pie

Chicken Pot Pie
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 6

1 cup baking mix (Bisquick)
1/3 cup Full Circle Fat Free Milk
1 egg, beaten
1 Tbs Food Club Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breast, cubed
2 carrots, diced
1/3 cup chopped onions
1 cup frozen green peas, thawed
2 celery stalks, chopped
1 (10 3/4 oz) can 98% fat free cream of mushroom soup
1/2 cup chicken broth

Preheat oven 400° F. Spray 6 ramekins with cooking spray.
In a medium bowl combine baking mix, milk and egg; mix well. Set aside.  In a skillet add olive oil and chicken; cook until chicken is browned. Add carrots and onions to skillet; cook until slightly tender. In a medium bowl combine chicken, carrots, onions, green peas, celery, soup and chicken broth; mix well. Pour vegetables into ramekin and top with baking mix batter. Bake pies 25 to 30 minutes, or until golden brown.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 304, Fat: 10 g (3 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 98 mg, Sodium: 652 mg, Carbohydrates: 23 g, Fiber: 3 g, Protein: 29 g

© 2011, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.

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Posted in: Cooking

Healthy Living: Think Pink

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month – an annual observation that promotes education, awareness and empowerment regarding this potentially deadly disease.

This year, it’s estimated that nearly 40,000 Americans will die of breast cancer, and more than 230,000 new cases will be diagnosed just in the United States, according to the Susan G. Komen For the Cure, the Dallas-based foundation that has been fighting breast cancer since 1982. Most doctors believe that the best weapon against breast cancer is early detection. If the cancer is not discovered until its causing symptoms, it has likely progressed to a more serious stage, and possibly has grown beyond just breast tissue.

Early detection saves lives!

So, not just during Breast Cancer Awareness Month but every month, please join Brookshire’s in the fight against breast cancer. Following just three simple steps will help in early detection.

Step 1: Mammograms: Yearly mammograms are recommended starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health.

Step 2: Clinical Breast Exam: Clinical breast exams by your doctor or nurse should be part of a periodic health exam about every three years for women in their 20s and 30s and every year for women 40 and older.

Step 3: Breast Self-Awareness: Women should know how their breasts normally feel and report any breast change promptly to their doctor or nurse. Breast self-exams should be part of every woman’s monthly routine starting by age 20; to help yourself remember, do your self-exam at roughly the same time every month.

It takes only a few minutes a month to take charge of your own health. Remember, together, we are the cure.

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Posted in: Healthy Living

Product Talk: Orville Redenbacher Lives!

There really was an Orville Redenbacher. That wasn’t just a funny name that some marketing guys dreamed up to sell popcorn.

If you’re old enough, of course, you already probably knew that, because you remember the TV commercials ol’ Orville used to make in the ‘70s and ‘80s, wearing his trademark bowtie and glasses and talking a mile a minute about popcorn. He really was an Indiana popcorn farmer, who had started out as a popcorn-obsessed kid and then set out to develop the world’s best, fluffiest popcorn. He launched his self-named company in the 1970s, and the rest was TV, and grocery store, history.

Mr. Redenbacher passed on about 15 years ago, but the popcorn brand he started is still one of the best-loved in the U.S.  And just like the entrepreneur who started it, the brand keeps managing to reinvent one of our favorite snacks – with new ideas like their single-packet Flavors.

These flavor singles come in three varieties –Extra Cheese, White Cheddar, and, taking a cue from a popular potato chip flavor, Sea Salt and Vinegar. Each comes with a separate seasoning packet, so you can decide if you want just a light sprinkle of seasoning or an intense flavor. And, because they are sold individually, not in a multi-pack box, you can try all three, or stock up on each family member’s favorite flavor.

The new flavors join a big lineup of Orville Redenbacher’s products, including microwave popcorn in kettle corn, caramel corn, nacho cheese,movie-theater butter, and light varieties.

I understand why Orville’s popcorn has such staying power – it really is good, popping up big and fluffy and with few inedible widows, and with true, bright flavors.

And, of course, it’s benefited from our growing awareness that when it comes to snacks, popcorn is a pretty healthy choice. It’s a whole grain, so it delivers more fiber than the average salty snack food. And years ago, Orville Redenbacher’s ditched the trans fats and lowered the salt content in its leading variety.  So you don’t have to feel guilty about indulging. Seems that even back in the day, Orville Redenbacher was really onto something.

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Posted in: Kids, Product Talk

Dine-In: Angel Food Cake

“Food of the Angels” is the term often used to describe the airy lightness of an angel food cake.

While most cakes use leavening agents, like baking powder and/or baking soda, angel food cake get its airiness from whipped egg whites.

So you can feel a little less guilty when enjoying a slice of angel food cake because it’s made with no fat, and one slice has fewer than half the calories typically found in a piece of most other types of cakes.

Angel food cake can be paired with seasonal fruits for a delicious dessert. Most people think first of berries or peaches, but this recipe takes advantage of the fruit that is in its peak season right now – apples. 

Apple Spice Angel Food Cake
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Serves: 12

1 lb apples, chopped
1 cup apple juice
1/2 cup Food Club Light Brown Sugar
1 tsp Food Club Ground Cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 Tasty Bakery Angel Food Cake

In a saucepan, over medium heat, combine apples, apple juice, sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Cook mixture until syrup like. Spoon mixture over angel food cake.

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Posted in: Cooking, Dine In

Family Matters: Table Manners

The holidays are stressful! All that last-minute cleaning, cooking, and preparing for guests, so take care of something now that doesn’t need to wait till the last minute – improving your children’s table manners.

Holiday dinners can be stressful for kids too – all those adults at the table, all that fancy food. And, you can’t expect your children to have perfect manners overnight. You must work with your kids now to teach them good manners. As parents, you must lead by example. If your elbows are on the table and you’re talking with your mouth full, don’t expect your children not to do the same.

Don’t make dinner a time of lectures and scolding. Praise your children for doing the right things instead of scolding them for doing the wrong. The key is to praise and reinforce. Here are a few table manners you and your family can work on now so they are ready for the holidays:

  • Before and after meals, make sure to wash your hands.
  • No pet, toys or electronics should be brought to the table. This includes cell phones.
  • Remove any hats before coming to the dinner table.
  • Place your napkin in your lap.
  • Wait until everyone is seated at the table before eating.
  • Ask politely if you need anything passed at the table. Don’t forget to say please and thank you.
  • Remember eating is not a race. Take your time and chew your food.
  • Don’t stuff your mouth. Only eat what you can.
  • When eating your food, keep your mouth closed.
  • If someone asks a question while you have food in your mouth, wait until you have swallowed before answering.
  • Avoid eating with your hands, unless appropriate.
  • Bring your food to your mouth rather than leaning too far into your plate..
  • Leave a little liquid in your glass to prevent slurping.
  • Ask to be excused before leaving the table.

Shop the sale: Ribs, ribs, ribs

The secret to great ribs is time. You have to let the ribs marinate in the sauce, so they absorb deep flavor, and you have to be patient cooking them, a long time at a lower temperature, so they get fall-off-the-bone tender.

Especially this time of year, the easiest way to cook them is in the oven. Even if you’re a rib purist, and think you can’t make ribs without putting them in the smoker, I think you’ll like this recipe, and the ease of this technique. It requires very little work once you put them in the oven, produces a nice tender rib, and gets a wonderful spicy/smoky flavor from the chipotles.

Any of the three types of ribs on sale this week at Brookshire’s – St. Louis-style pork ribs, medium pork spareribs, or pork baby back ribs- would work in this recipe, but I’d probably pick the St. Louis-style ribs. “St. Louis-style” ribs just means that the tips, which can be gristly anyway, have been cut away, leaving a nice, flat, rectangular slab that will fit nicely in a roasting pan.

Oven BBQ’d Ribs
Serves 8

2 tablespoons  vegetable oil
1/2  yellow onion, chopped fine
2 cloves  garlic, minced
1 3/4 cups  ketchup
3/4 cup chipotles, canned
1 cup   molasses
1/3 cup  sugar
8-10 pounds ribs (about two St. Louis style rib racks, each cut in half, or about four baby-back rib racks)
Kosher salt, to taste

Heat the oil in medium saucepan on medium-high, and add the onion and garlic. Sauté until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the rest of the ingredients, except the ribs; turn heat to low, and simmer uncovered for 25 minutes. Cool to room temperature.

Put the ribs and the sauce in a large plastic sealable bag, and refrigerate overnight.

Preheat oven to 300°F. Remove ribs from bag and reserve liquid and set aside. Season ribs with salt. Arrange the ribs on a foil-lined baking sheet and cover tightly with foil. Bake for 2 1/2 hours. Meanwhile, bring the barbecue sauce to a boil in a pot on the stove. Boil for 3 minutes, and set aside.

Uncover the ribs, turn them over, and bake an additional 30 minutes. Brush with barbecue sauce on both sides, and serve hot.

Healthy Living: A Happy Healthy Halloween!

Halloween was historically a celebration marking the end of summer and the harvest season. Over the centuries, many of the old traditions have endured, just in a slightly different form.

When Halloween was first celebrated in America, the poor would go from door to door asking for “soul cakes” in exchange for prayers for the family’s lost loved ones. The old “soul cakes” tradition has transformed into what we know today as trick or treating.

When I was younger, my family would go to the church fall carnival instead of trick or treating. My brother and I were not there for soul cakes, but candy; lots and lots of candy. As soon as we got home from the carnival, my brother and I would pour all our candy out on the dining room table and begin the great candy trade. (I was allergic to chocolate so Halloween was not as fun for me as it was for my brother.)

If you want your children to experience the fun of Halloween, it does not mean you have to let them overdose on the sugar. Many children end up coming home with enough candy to last them a month! Instead, think of ways to limit the sugar shock, both for your own family and the neighborhood kids:

Hand out healthier treats: Candy bars aren’t your only option.

  • Fruit makes a nice alternative. Consider Full Circle raisins that have a NuVal score of 8, apples with a NuVal score of 96, bananas with a NuVal score of a 91 or oranges with a NuVal score of 100.
  • Food is not the only thing that you can pass out. You can also give out pencils, stickers, glow sticks and crayons.
  • Many snack companies have gotten the message and sell small treat-size packages of better-for-kids snacks like pretzels, goldfish crackers, fruit wraps or granola bars. If you have leftovers after the trick-or-treaters are all gone, these foods are better suited to after-school snacks, sports team practices, or to pop into a lunch box, too.

Donate some of the haul:  Instead of having candy left all over your house for a month, look into a local candy buy-back program. Many dentists have a program where they “buy back” candy from children and send the candy overseas to our armed forces. Double win: You get the candy out of your house, and you donate to the brave men and women who are protecting our country. If you can’t find a candy buy-back program near you, check online for programs that send candy to our brave soldiers.

Product Talk: New cranberry – pecan chicken salad

If you like chicken salad – or actually, even if you don’t  – you need to try our new cranberry chicken salad, which has just arrived in all our stores with delis.

This new offering updates traditional chicken salad with a modern twist – the sweet-savory flavor that’s a big trend with restaurants and chefs these days.

This is no bland salad; it has tons of flavor. Made with tender, all-white chicken breast, the salad gets a burst of sweetness from chopped cranberries and just a bit of crushed pineapple, and texture and crunch from pecans. The creamy dressing, with just a hint of honey, brings it all together.

It’s fancy enough to serve to guests, especially if you put it on a croissant or on a bed of mixed greens, but familiar enough to make it a good choice for a regular lunch or a light supper for family.

You’ll find the cranberry chicken salad with our other salads in the chef case and in our self-serve deli sections, where it’s available pre-packaged in a 12-ounce container, so you can pick it up quickly when you’re on the run. Try some and see if it doesn’t change your mind about what makes a great chicken salad.

Dine-In: Chicken Cacciatore

Chicken cacciatore is a fancy name for what’s really a pretty simple dish – braised chicken, Italian style.

The name comes from the Italian phrase for “hunter’s style,” which in culinary terms usually means “with mushrooms,”  but in this case also means cooked with tomatoes and wine. Chicken cacciatore was a popular dish in the ‘60s and ‘70s, and you can still find it in some old-school Italian restaurants, but for the most part it is one of those dishes you just don’t see much anymore.

I don’t really understand that, because it’s actually a very solid dish, easy to make but full of flavor. Serve it over pasta, or with some warm, crusty bread, and you have a hearty dinner for a cool evening.

I prefer using thigh meat, because I think the dark meat is moister and more flavorful, but if you like white meat better, you can substitute an equivalent amount of bone-in chicken breasts, probably about one package of four breasts, depending on the size. Do not use boneless, skinless breasts unless that’s all you have; cooking the chicken with the bones and skin adds a much richer flavor.

In all, this is a pretty classic recipe, including the use of red wine. If you are not used to cooking with wine, be aware that the alcohol evaporates during the cooking. If you prefer not to use it, perhaps because of allergies to the sulfites in red wine, you can substitute additional chicken stock, but the finished dish will not have quite the depth of flavor as the original recipe. 

Chicken Cacciatore with Mushrooms and Herbs
Serves 4

8 bone-in chicken thighs (about 3 pounds), trimmed of excess fat
1 tsp. teaspoon olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
3 portobello mushroom caps, wiped clean and cut into 3/4-inch cubes
4 medium cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 tbls.unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/2  cups dry red wine
1/2 cup chicken stock or low-sodium canned chicken broth
1 can diced tomatoes (14 1/2 ounces), drained
2 tsp. fresh thyme leaves, minced
1 piece Parmesan cheese rind (2 inches, about 1 ounce), optional
2 tsp. fresh sage leaves, minced

Season chicken with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 2 minutes. Add four chicken thighs, skin-side down, and cook, not moving them until skin is crisp and well browned, about 5 minutes; using tongs, flip chicken and brown on second side, about 5 minutes longer. Transfer browned chicken to large plate; brown remaining chicken thighs, transfer to plate, and set aside.

Drain off all but 1 tablespoon fat from pot. Add onion, mushrooms, and 1/2 teaspoon salt; sauté over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until moisture evaporates and vegetables begin to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile, remove and discard skin from browned chicken thighs. Add garlic to pot and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in flour and cook, stirring constantly, about 1 minute. Add wine, scraping pot bottom with wooden spoon to loosen brown bits. Stir in stock, tomatoes, thyme, cheese rind (if using), 1/2 teaspoon salt (omit salt if using cheese rind), and pepper to taste. Submerge chicken pieces in liquid and bring to boil; cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer until chicken is tender and cooked through, about 45 minutes, turning chicken pieces with tongs halfway through cooking. Discard cheese rind, stir in sage, adjust seasonings with salt and pepper, and serve.

If your Dutch oven is large enough to hold all the chicken pieces in a single layer without crowding, brown all the pieces at once instead of in batches. The Parmesan cheese rind is optional, but it is recommended for the robust, savory flavor it adds to the dish. An equal amount of minced fresh rosemary can be substituted for the sage.

Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

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