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Healthy Living: Tutti Fruitti for Diabetics


Is fruit good for you? Of course it is! It’s full of antioxidants and nutrition—and great taste! When you’re diabetic, though, you have to remember that fruit contains natural sugar—and the carbohydrates need to be balanced in your diet.

Different fruits have differing amounts of carbohydrates, though, and that can help you as you plan your menu for the day. Look below for some comparisons.

Medium apple: 110 calories, 30 grams carbohydrates

Medium banana: 105 calories, 27 g carbs

Pear: 96 calories, 26 g carbs

Watermelon wedge: 86 calories, 22 g carbs

Medium orange: 86 calories, 22 g carbs

1 cup seedless grapes: 62 calories, 16 g carbs

1 cup cantaloupe cubes: 54 calories, 13 g carbs

1 Circular slice pineapple: 42 calories, 11 g carbs

1 cup whole strawberries: 46 calories, 11 g carbs



Healthy Living: Eye Care


Sight is something that people often overlook, but your eyes are very important! Below are some tips to help keep your eyesight healthy & strong.

  • Overexposure to the sun can accelerate cataract development. Protect your eyesight by wearing sunglasses as much as possible.
  • Be aware that medications (both over-the-counter and prescription) can affect your eyesight.
  • Always let your doctor know what you are taking to avoid potentially harmful combinations.
  • Visit you optometrist every 3-5 years.
  • People with pronounced eye problems should visit more frequently.

Dry Eyes

  • Dry eyes occur when you body fails to product enough tears
  • Causes are: aging, air quality, medicines, and computer use
  • Treatment is artificial tears

Allergy Eyes

  • Caused by aero allergens (pollen; etc…)
  • Symptoms include:  red, itchy, or watery eyes
  • Treated by allergy eye drops that contain antihistamines and decongestants

Irritated Eyes

  • Caused by irritants (chlorine, ammonia; etc.) or foreign bodies (dust, eyelashes; etc.)
  • Treated with sterile eyewash

 

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Product Talk: It’s Bacon!!


Actually, it’s not. It’s not really bacon, but if you’re trying to watch your diet, it’s the next best thing. Bacon Salt, from J&D’s, is a seasoned salt that tastes deliciously bacon-y. It comes in several varieties (regular, hickory and peppered) and a sprinkle on top of a ground turkey burger will make you think you’re having a double-bacon burger deluxe.

The only caution to advise is that it IS salt, so it IS high in sodium. Other than that, it’s fat-free, cholesterol-free and zero calories. Now THAT’s what bacony goodness is all about!

You’ll find J&D’s Bacon Salt in the spices and seasonings section of Brookshire’s.



Dine In: Beef Tenderloin


If you’re like me, most of the time you’re saving every nickel you can. Times are tough! But every once in a while, you need a special dinner. Maybe you’ve got extra-special friends coming over, or maybe you just need a well-deserved splurge. If you want to show someone how much you care, here’s a tip: don’t make reservations….make dinner at home! It’s the ultimate gift from the heart.

Ever had a beef tenderloin? A tenderloin is what filet mignon steaks are made from. To make filet, the tenderloin is sliced into rounds. So a tenderloin roast is just one large filet mignon—and man oh man, is it delicious. It’s pricey—but trust me, you get what you pay for. Watch for a sale in the meat department and grab one. Put it in the freezer until that special time comes, and you’ll be ready to splurge. Bonus: because it’s so low-fat, it’s actually a pretty healthy cut of meat!

Side dishes can be as simple or as elegant as you wish: mashed potatoes, steamed broccoli, fresh asparagus or a tossed salad. Simple is good when you have a delicious main course like this!

Simple Roast Tenderloin
Prep time: 10 minutes; Cook time: 45 minutes

3 to 4 pound beef tenderloin, trimmed and tied with twine (to help it hold its shape)
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ teaspoon onion powder
½ teaspoon garlic salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Place the tenderloin on a broiler pan. Rub roast with olive oil and sprinkle with onion, garlic and pepper.

Roast the tenderloin for 15 minutes per pound for rare, or 20 minutes per pound for medium rare.

Let roast rest 15 minutes before carving.

Serves 6

Nutritional Information
Calories per serving: 307.  Fat: 16 grams (5 gr. saturated fat), cholesterol: 156 mg., sodium: 101 mg., carbohydrates: 0 gr., fiber: 0 gr., Protein: 49 gr.

© 2009, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.



Family Matters: Compromise, Not Sacrifice!


My kids are much older now, but when they were little, I was a real fanatic about serving only the most-healthy foods possible. Compromise was out of the question. In the years since then, I’ve softened my position, and while my family still eats healthier than most, sometimes you have to give a little here and there. And it’s compromise, not sacrifice. We stay true to the most important aspects of our food plan, but there are some areas where a little splurge now and then can be a good thing!

For instance, in their lunch boxes, or in the snack bag when we went to visit friends, I used to insist on ultra-healthy, ultra-natural foods. And I’m still not going to put cookies and chips in the bag, but I have decided that some of the pre-packaged items I’d always boycotted weren’t really that bad! Crust-less sandwiches, frozen yogurt tubes and juice boxes were still a lot cheaper than buying fast food, and they weren’t as pure as foods I prepared myself, but you know what? They’ll still work just fine. Kids do like to fit in with their friends, and the convenience of ready-to-use items is really handy. At home, they’re happy to eat what they’ve always eaten, but when it’s a special time, the food can be special, too.

We saved these items for play dates and lunch boxes, and it turned out to be a compromise that worked.



Shop the Sale: Split Chicken Halves


Sometimes you see something on sale and you know exactly what to do with it. Hot dogs? No problem. But split chicken halves? You hate to miss out on a bargain, but what do you do with them?

Not  a problem! Don’t let the form distract you from the product. Whether it’s a half a chicken or a chicken breast tender, it’s all CHICKEN!

A split chicken half is either a breast and wing, or a thigh and drumstick. It’s like you drew a line right down the middle of a whole chicken. Hey, that’s probably why they call them chicken halves!

The easiest way to cook a chicken half is to slip them in a baking pan, add a bit of chicken broth, sprinkle on some salt and pepper and let them bake. They’re kind of large, so they’ll most likely take 30 to 45 minutes at 375° F. But that gives you plenty of time to cook some pasta and make a salad….for an effortless dinner. And if you know you’re going to have a really busy day ahead, pull out Ole Betsy—your infallible slow cooker—and let her do the work while you’re busy all day.

To make eating easier for your family, pull the meat off the bones once it’s cooked. Shred or chop and it looks much more user-friendly.



Healthy Living: Low-Fat & Gluten-Free


If it’s not one thing, it’s another. Doesn’t it feel that way sometimes? If you use dairy products, you may be using low-fat varieties to help keep your weight in check. But guess what? Many low-fat ice cream, sour cream, cottage cheese and buttermilk products contain modified food starch—and modified food starch contains gluten.

What’s a person to do? In this case, the best bet is to buy the full-fat dairy products and watch your calories elsewhere. But take heart: gluten-free eaters often avoid many of the typical “junk” foods that are high in calories, so you’re already ahead of the game in this respect.



Product Talk: Rice


What’s this week’s four-letter word? RICE. Yes, rice. Talk about plain and simple, rice can do just about anything, and there are more varieties of rice than you can shake a stick at. Brown rice, white rice, wild rice, long grain, short grain….the list goes on and on.

For most of us, the first decision is white rice versus brown rice. Brown rice is whole-grain rice, and the white version had much of the extra nutrition removed—very similar to how bread has white and whole-grain brown types. White rice cooks a little faster, but brown rice is healthier and only take about 5minutes longer to cook.

Check the package of every rice variety for cooking proportions, but much of the time, it’s two or three to one; that is, two or three parts water to one part rice. Some use a bit more or less, so read the label the first time. Rice does best when the water is brought to a boil; rice added; returned to a simmer; cover and simmer until water has been absorbed.

Once cooked, refrigerate rice in a covered container. It also freezes well. Spread it on a baking sheet, in a single layer. Freeze and then transfer to a freezer bag where you can remove as much as you need at a time. This is almost instant rice!

Have you ever made fried rice? It’s nice and simple. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a skillet. Add a teaspoon of minced garlic and a cup each of shredded carrots, frozen peas and leftover chicken. Sauté 5 minutes. Stir in 2 cups of cooked rice and add soy sauce tot taste. Serve throughout and serve! (Don’t forget the chop sticks.)

Or how about green rice salad? Mix 1 ½ cups cooked rice, 1 cup thawed green peas, ¼ cup chopped parsley and about 1/3 cup Italian salad dressing. Mix and serve!

Rice has lots of carbohydrates, which makes it a good energy source. Brown rice has more complex carbohydrates, due to the whole-grained nature of it. Diabetics need to watch how much rice they eat, because of their concerns with carbohydrate balancing. People on a gluten-free diet can enjoy rice in place of pasta!



Dine In: Steak and Potatoes—with Flair!


What’s the favorite weekend dinner meal? It’s gotta be steak! And if you fix it on the grill, there’s no doubt that steak will be at the top of the list! So whether you broil it or grill it, a great dine-at-home meal often includes steak.

But what goes with steak? Of course it’s a baked potato, no question, but how about switching that up just a bit? How about making that a baked SWEET potato? If you’ve been to a steak house restaurant, you know that baked sweet potatoes, with butter, brown sugar and cinnamon taste just about like pumpkin pie—delightful! But did you know that unsweetened, they still taste amazing?

 To speed dinner along, you can make sweet potato fries—and you’ll dazzle everyone. Peel and cut sweet potatoes into French-fry-sized strips. Toss them in a large plastic bag (or a bowl) along with a tablespoon of olive oil. Spread in a single layer on a pan and bake at 375 for 20 to 30 minutes. It’s that easy! And besides the wonderful flavor, sweet potatoes are powerhouses of nutrition, with lots of fiber and Vitamins A and C (great for eyesight and immunity health). And even better: sweet potatoes are on sale at Brookshire’s this week!

Top it off with a salad and fresh fruit for dessert and you have an A-1 dinner, fit for a gourmet, at budget prices…and with great health benefits.



Family Matters: Parakeet Health


Sometimes toddlers like to eat the same food, day after day after day. Mothers wonder what’s wrong with them—because most folks like a little variety in their diet. 

It’s the same with birds, too.  If you have a parakeet, do you offer a variety of foods? It’s easy to fall into the pattern of the same foods, but your bird will thank you for switching things up a little. 

Many experts say that instead of a seed diet, parakeets do better with a diet of special bird pellets. It’s a lower fat diet that keeps birds more active and healthy. If your bird is currently eating a seed diet, you may want to talk to your vet or pet care provider about making a gradual switch to the pellet food plan. 

Pellets (or seeds) should make up about 60 to 70 percent of your parakeet’s diet. The rest can be a mixture of fruits and vegetables, including grated carrot, raw broccoli, apple slices and leafy greens. Vets recommend no fruit seeds, avocados, chocolate, alcohol or caffeine. Remove uneaten food every day and replace with fresh. Birds also need clean water, changed daily. 

You’ll know you have a healthy parakeet if you see alert, sociable activity, dry nostrils and bright eyes, and a body full of smooth, well-groomed feathers. 

(Material collected from the ASPCA Complete Guide to Pet Care)



Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

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