share. The Brookshire's Blog

Tex-Mex cheese steak nachos


Tex-Mex cheese steak nachos

Ingredients:
1 Tbs vegetable oil
1 cup chopped poblano pepper
1 cup chopped white onion
6 oz sirloin, flank steak or rib eye, sliced into strips and then cut into bites
1 jar Leigh Oliver’s White Queso, any flavor
Salt and pepper
1 can refried beans or refried black beans
6 oz tortilla chips
Garnish: sour cream, chopped tomato, guacamole, chopped onion, jalapeño

Directions:
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add peppers and onions
and sauté for about 4 minutes, until tender. Remove peppers and onions from
skillet and set aside. Sprinkle sirloin with salt and pepper. Add to skillet and cook
over medium-high heat until brown, but still medium-rare, about 4 minutes.
Remove from heat. Heat refried beans in microwave until warmed throughout,
about 2 minutes, stirring once.

Arrange chips on serving platter and top each with a dollop of refried beans and a slice of sirloin. Drizzle with Leigh Oliver’s White Queso and garnish as desired. Serve immediately.



Product Talk: New, improved, Food Club Sodas!


New, improved, Food Club Sodas!On a hot day like today, a cool, refreshing soft drink sounds like just the ticket. Especially one of our new, improved Food Club sodas, with better taste, new packaging and some exciting new flavors, all at the great prices you’ve come to expect from Food Club.

Have you tried one yet? Our Food Club soda lineup now includes 17 flavors, including five diet varieties.

We’re especially proud to introduce three new flavors:

  •   Vanilla Cream: The old-fashioned, American favorite.
  •   Cherry Cola: Our great cola taste, perked up with sweet cherry flavor.
  •   Cola Zero: All the taste, zero calories!

We’ve updated and improved all our flavors, creating brighter, fresher tastes. But all your old favorites are still in the soda lineup, including grape, lemon-lime, root beer, strawberry, orange, diet lemon-lime, diet root beer and regular diet cola.

By the way, we’ve updated the packaging too. Food Club sodas are still available in  two-liter bottles, great for a crowd, and 12-ounce cans. But now, if you prefer the convenience of a reclosable bottle, try our new 6-packs of 16.9 ounce plastic bottles – great when you’re on the go!

Each week during August, we are randomly giving away $50 to be loaded to your Brookshire’s Thank You Card.  Just send your Thank You Card number to facebook@brookshires.com for a chance to win.  View the Food Club Soda bracket!  Contest starts on Wednesday, August 3, 2011.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Product Talk


Dine-In: Spinach Lasagna


Today is National Lasagna Day! I’m all in favor of celebrating this terrific Italian favorite, but, to be honest, I usually think of traditional lasagna as a better choice for fall or winter. Traditional versions are usually rich, meaty and filling, great comfort food when it’s chilly outside.

 

So for summer, try this version. It’s got whole wheat lasagna noodles and a filling made of lower-fat cheeses and baby spinach, making it lighter but still satisfying on a balmy evening.

Spinach Lasagna
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients:
1 (8 oz) pkg whole wheat lasagna
8 oz 2% mozzarella cheese, shredded
6 oz parmesan cheese, shredded
2 cups Food Club Low Fat Cottage Cheese
1 egg, beaten
1 tsp ground oregano
1 tsp dried basil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 (10 oz) bag baby spinach
1 (26 oz) jar Food Club Traditional Pasta

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350° F. Spray an oven safe baking dish with cooking spray.

In a pot bring water to a boil. Add lasagna noodles; cook until al dente (cooked firm and not too soft).

In a large bowl combine mozzarella, parmesan and cottage cheese; mix well. Mix egg into cheese mixture. Add oregano, basil and minced garlic; mix well.

Layer lasagna noodles, cheese mixture, spinach and spaghetti sauce in baking dish. Repeat layering; ending with sauce and cheese. Bake for 30 minutes.

Nutritional Information: Calories per Serving: 336, Fat: 13 g (7 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 51 mg, Sodium: 898 mg, Carbohydrates: 28 g, Fiber: 5 g, Protein: 25 g

© 2011, Brookshire Grocery Co.  Nutrient counts are rounded to the nearest whole number.  All dietary and lifestyle changes should be supervised by a physician.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Dine In


Family Matters: Feeding Baby Safely


It’s a big step in the care and feeding of your baby: The day you begin feeding solid foods.

While you may receive lots of well-meaning advice from grandparents, friends, and even the occasional stranger, you should recognize that recommendations may well have changed since the advice-giver was feeding their baby.

Always consult your pediatrician before starting your infant on solid foods. And brush up on some of the current prevailing wisdom on safely feeding solids.

When to start: Most babies can start eating solid food when they are between four and six months of age. That’s when they are able to swallow foods, as opposed to pushing back with their tongue against a feeding spoon. Yes, Grandma may say that she started feeding cereal when her baby was just six weeks old and it helped the baby sleep through the night, but today, pediatricians recognize infants can’t properly digest or swallow solids that young, and cereal served from a bottle can be a choking hazard.

Veggies first? You may have heard you should offer vegetables before trying fruit, so a baby used to applesauce doesn’t turn up her nose at the stronger tastes of things like pureed cauliflower or peas. Guess what? Researchers say it doesn’t really matter.  Babies are born with an innate taste for sweet foods, and that preference doesn’t change whether they’re fed peas or peaches first.  

Don’t hold the spice: The preference for bland, un-spiced baby food is largely a cultural issue. In other parts of the world, babies are served food that’s spiced the same way as adult food, and there’s little research that spicy foods harm children. Use common sense and stay away from really spicy things that may harm babies’ sensitive mouths and noses – no wasabi or habaneros – but a little cinnamon, ginger, cumin or even mild chiles like poblanos may tickle your baby’s palate and help them learn to eat a wider variety of foods while young.

Safety first: Baby-food recalls are often a parent’s big worry, but they’re actually quite rare. A much bigger safety issue is just following safety rules for proper feeding and food-handling.   

• Do not feed baby directly from the jar of food, unless you plan to use the entire jar at one meal. Saliva from your baby’s mouth can lead to the growth of harmful bacteria in the food. If you must serve from the jar, throw away any uneaten portion.
• Never microwave baby food. Uneven heating can cause hot spots that can burn baby’s mouth.
• Never leave a baby alone with food _ not even for a minute, while running to answer the phone.
• Don’t feed honey to a baby under 12 months; some pediatricians, in fact, now recommend 18 months as the cutoff.
• Slowly introduce potentially allergenic foods like peanut butter, eggs and wheat. A few years ago, the American Academy of Pediatrics reported that research does not support holding off on allergenic foods until after age 1, clearing the way to offer them to babies sooner. However, many pediatricians still suggest going slowly, especially if your baby has eczema or there’s a family history of food allergies or asthma.



Shop the Sale: Off to College Shopping Spree!


It still feels like summer just got started, but I got a wakeup call the other day while walking through the seasonal aisles at my local Brookshire’s store. The back-to-college goodies are already in stock!

Having already gone through the process of sending my own daughters off to school, I know what an overwhelming time this is for parents and college students, especially new freshmen or those leaving home for the very first time.

Aside from the emotion of starting a brand new life, and taking a very big step toward adulthood, there are the actual logistics involved in setting up a new home. Some things – computer, new bedding, photos of family and friends – are a given.  But the rest is a big tossup. What’s going to fit in that little dorm room or new campus apartment? What can I scavenge from the parents or grandparents, and what will I need to buy new? What can I absolutely not live without?

Again, as a mom who’s been through this, I can tell you it’s important to make sure your child takes a few things that both make them feel at home and make their lives easier. (They’re going to be stressed enough already!) We selected some special items for our seasonal aisles with the comfort and happiness of new students in mind:

Big Boss Grills: Even if your student never mastered much beyond pushing the buttons on the microwave, you can be assured they can feed themselves if they have one of these counter cookers. It’s a grill, a griddle, a waffle iron and a sandwich maker, all in one.

Big Boss Blenders: Just right for a student, this powerful blender makes single-serving smoothies, shakes or salsas. It even chops ingredients for salsas or grinds coffee beans. 

Big Boss Rapid Wave ovens: A microwave alternative, this is a tabletop cooker that uses three kinds of power (halogen, convection and infrared technology) to cook foods without added oil. Again, this As Seen on TV item is a good solution for young adults who may not know much about cooking, but who don’t want to end up subsisting on fast food or cafeteria fare.

While you’re shopping, check out the seasonal aisles for things like Rubbermaid totes (great for packing up for the big move) and a couple of throw rugs from Garland Rugs, to add some homey warmth to that cold dorm room floor. And one more thing: I’d suggest laying in a supply of your student’s favorite study-time snacks, especially healthier, storable items like granola bars or roasted almonds. If you can’t be there when your student is stressing out during a 2 am study session, at least you know they’ll be well-nourished.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Shop the Sale


Healthy Living: Healthy Lunches


It’s that time of year again, summer is ending and school is just around the corner. Parents prepare their children for the start of the school year by purchasing new school uniforms, new school supplies, and helping to finish all the school summer projects. What parents may fail to adequately prepare is healthy school lunches. As you prepare your child for the school year, do not neglect their nutrition. A healthy mind stems from a healthy body and a healthy diet.

A healthy diet includes all three nutrient classes: carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. All three nutrients make the body healthy and strong. A proper diet is essential in children, as they need these nutrients in order to grow strong, both physically and mentally. A carbohydrate is the body’s energy source. Good carbohydrates to include in your child’s lunch are: fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread products, and low-fat dairy products. Try to avoid empty, unhealthy carbohydrates, such as: chips, cookies, crackers, and sweets. Protein is important in normal growth and development. It helps children develop strong muscles. Good protein sources include: beans, nuts, turkey, ham, and peanut butter. Lastly, healthy fats are important in your child’s development. Healthy fats include: salad dressings, such as Italian dressing and low-fat Ranch dressing as a nice side to dip their carrots or celery in.

Just because your child needs a healthy lunch, does not mean it needs to be boring. A few tips to encourage your child to eat their healthy lunch include:

  1. Include a low-fat dip, such as peanut butter or low-fat ranch with the vegetables (carrots, celery) so that your kids enjoy the taste more.
  2. Instead of a sweet dessert, include a low-fat yogurt, Jell-O, or fruit choice, as these are sweet and healthy substitutes.
  3. Instead of including regular potato chips, use baked chips or pretzels as a healthier alternative.
  4. When preparing sandwiches, use whole-grain bread instead of white bread. Go easy on the mayonnaise.
  5. As for drinks, include low-fat milk or water frequently. Use juice or soda sparingly. These are full of sugar and empty calories.


Product Talk: Pork Butt


The cut of pork known as pork butt doesn’t get much as much respect as trendier, leaner, and fancier  cuts like pork tenderloin.

But I really prefer pork butt for many dishes, especially pulled pork sandwiches and tacos. Think of it as the pork version of pot roast. Because it’s got better marbling and higher fat content, it stays moist and cooks up tender, especially if you use a slow-cooking method like a crockpot. (Pork loin and pork tenderloin are both easy to overcook, giving you a dried-out, tough piece of meat.)

Pork butt also has a deeper, richer, meatier flavor than some of those other “white-meat” pork cuts.  And it absorbs flavor nicely during cooking, without a lot of work. If you’re cooking in the oven or a crockpot, for instance, you can just coat the meat with a dry rub before cooking. Or to create the Mexican dish known as carnitas, great in tacos, cook with chiles and orange juice, or another citrus.

Plus, did I mention it’s affordable, often just about half the price of leaner cuts?

This recipe makes a great weekend supper, and makes enough that you can invite a few friends. If you’re short on time, you can use your favorite prepared barbecue sauce instead of putting together homemade.

Oven Pulled Pork with Homemade BBQ Sauce
Serves 6 to 8.

Ingredients

Pork:
1 cup + 2 Tbs salt
½ cup + 2 Tbs sugar
3 Tbs + 2 tsp liquid smoke
5 lbs boneless pork butt
¼ cup creole mustard
2 Tbs ground black pepper
2 Tbs smoked paprika
1 tsp cayenne pepper

BBQ Sauce:
1 ½ cups ketchup
¼ cup  molasses
2 Tbs Worcestershire sauce
1 Tbs Louisiana hot sauce
½ tsp kosher salt
½ tsp black pepper, fresh ground

Directions:

Pork:
Deeply score pork 5-6 time to allow brine to penetrate.

Dissolve 1 cup salt, 1/2 cup sugar, and 3 Tbs liquid smoke in 4 quarts cold water in large container. Submerge pork in brine and refrigerate for 2-3 hours.

While pork brines, combine mustard and remaining 2 tsp liquid smoke in small bowl; set aside. Combine black pepper, paprika, remaining 2 Tbs sugar, remaining 2 tsp salt, and cayenne in second small bowl; set aside. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees.

Remove pork from brine and dry thoroughly with paper towels. Rub mustard mixture over entire surface of of pork. Sprinkle entire surface of each piece with spice mixture. Place pork on wire rack set inside foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Place piece of parchment paper over pork, then cover with sheet of aluminum foil, sealing edges to prevent moisture from escaping. Roast pork for 3 hours.

Remove pork from oven; remove and discard foil and parchment. Carefully pour off liquid in bottom of baking sheet. Remove fat from liquid and reserve for sauce. Return pork to oven and cook, uncovered, until well browned, tender, and internal temperature registers 200 degrees on instant-read thermometer, about 1½ hours. Transfer pork to serving dish, and let rest for 20 minutes.

Sauce:
While pork rests, pour 1/2 cup of defatted cooking liquid into medium bowl; whisk in sauce ingredients.

Using 2 forks, shred pork into bite-sized pieces. Toss with 1 cup sauce and season with salt and pepper.

Serve, passing remaining sauce separately.



Dine In: Well, hot dog!


Nearly every kid loves hot dogs, but a lot of adults do, too. After all, Americans will eat 7 billion hot dogs this summer, so kids can’t be eating all of them!

July is National Hot Dog month, so it’s a great time to throw some ‘dogs on the grill for an easy summer cookout. (If you’re worried about the fat content, look for all-turkey dogs, or low-fat or non-fat varieties that can have as few as 50 calories each.)

And how will you dress your dog? The National Hot Dog & Sausage Council, which tracks such things, says mustard is the most popular condiment, followed by ketchup and then chili, with relish and onions far behind. But why not mix it up a bit? Check these ideas for bringing some unusual, gourmet, or regional flavors to your table: 

  • Top with fried onions (like Durkee’s) and spicy mustard.
  • Top with ranch dressing and cooked, crumbled bacon. A more adult alternative: Use blue cheese dressing and crumbled blue cheese along with the bacon!
  • Instead of offering chopped raw onions, grill or sauté slices of onions and red and green bell peppers, similar to the topping you typically get on Italian sausage.
  • Frito-pie dog: Top with chili, grated cheese, and crumbled Fritos.
  • Make it Asian style: Instead of ketchup, use teriyaki sauce; soy sauce; sriracha sauce, a spicy, Asian-inspired chile sauce; or hoisin, a slightly sweet, slightly spicy Chinese-style sauce.
  • Chicago ‘dog: Load it up with yellow mustard, relish, chopped raw onion, tomato slices, celery salt, and serve in a soft poppy seed bun. A dill pickle spear can be stuffed in the bun as well.
  • Kansas City ‘dog: Melted Swiss cheese and warm sauerkraut, stuffed into a sesame-seed bun.
  • Mexico ‘dog: At streetside stalls across Mexico, the hot dog is given star treatment: It’s wrapped in bacon and grilled, then topped with chopped raw onion and tomato; tomatillo (green) salsa; and a squirt of hot sauce, and served in a soft egg bun. You can then add mayonnaise, ketchup and mustard if you please.

This easy topping recipe is billed as a Texas-style ‘dog, thanks to its barbecue sauce and pickle-spiked coleslaw.

http://brookshires.mywebgrocer.com/RecipeDetails.aspx?Pos=0&Search=hot%20dogs&SRC2=0&RecipeID=53616&cc=1&s=158775443&g=3a38de0d-8f21-4a24-b69a-4468a4b3a35c&uc=DC97B



Family Matters: Waffle Bowls


July was declared National Ice Cream Month in 1984 by President Ronald Reagan. Celebrate by decorating a waffle bowl and filling it up with creamy, cold Goldenbrook Farms Ice Cream!

See these waffle bowls in the July issue of Celebrate Cooking.  Available online and in all Brookshire’s stores.

Wacky Waffle Bowls
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 10

Ingredients:
1 (7 oz) pkg waffle bowls
1 (6 oz) pkg white baking chocolate, melted
1 (8 oz) pkg semi sweet baking chocolate, melted
Toppings: shredded coconut, sprinkles and chopped nuts
Goldenbrook Farms Ice Cream, flavors of your choice

Directions:
Place semi sweet chocolate baking squares and white chocolate baking squares in separate bowls. Place bowls one at a time in the microwave for 30 seconds. Stir chocolate. Microwave chocolate in 15 second intervals, stirring after each time you microwave until chocolate is melted.

With a spoon pour melted chocolate over the rim of the waffle bowl. Make sure you cover both the inside and outside rims of the bowl.

Decorate each bowl by adding your favorite color sprinkles, chopped nuts or shredded coconut.

Allow chocolate to harden. Add a few scoops of your favorite Goldenbrook Farms creamy ice cream to waffle bowls and serve.

| Permalink | Print
Posted in: Family Matters


America’s Dessert with a Cherry on top


No dessert could be simpler than the
ice cream sundae–a scoop of ice cream,
a sweet topping, and the ubiquitous whipped cream and cherry at the top.

However, icons are never really that simple,
and, perhaps more than any other dish,
the sundae is an American icon.

Like people, nations are what they eat. More than any other native dish, the ice cream sundae is an essential reminder of the American genius for invention, passion for indulgence, and reputation for wackiness…it’s as messy and irresistible as democracy itself.

Source: icecreamsundae.com



Copyright © 2010-2014, Brookshire’s. All rights reserved.
The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

Mi Blog Hispano

De Todo un Poco
Subscribe via RSS