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Dine In: Lemon Orzo Chicken Salad


Lemon Orzo Chicken SaladFamily vacation at the beach entails 19 people in one house under one roof for a week. We love it, but let’s face it: even the closest of families can be so confined.

This year at the beach, it’s rained almost every day, further compounding our “togetherness.” We’ve played games, taken a trip to the local aquarium, had a dance off, played hide-and-seek with the kids (which ended badly with a downed shower curtain rod), watched movies and made T-shirts. There have been funny moments, and there have been a few tense moments.

However, there is always harmony during mealtime. Prep time constitutes happy hour. Then, we feed the kids. After the kids are full, they are dispatched to the “kids’ room” for Legos, pool or Toss Across while the adults eat.

The adults have taken to eating on the porch if the weather is conducive. This summer salad has the perfect, beachy flavors. Salty air, optional.

Lemon Orzo Chicken Salad

Ingredients:
1/4 cup orzo, uncooked
3 cups grilled chicken breast, chopped
1 1/2 cups baby spinach
1 cup grape tomatoes, halved
1/2 cup red bell pepper, chopped
1/4 cup pre-chopped red onion
2 Tbs fresh basil, chopped
1 tsp fresh oregano, chopped
2 Tbs red wine vinegar
1 Tbs extra virgin olive oil
1/8 tsp salt
1/8 tsp black pepper
6 Tbs (1 1/2 oz) goat cheese, crumbled

Directions:
Cook orzo according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; drain well.

Combine orzo, chicken and the next 6 ingredients (through oregano) in a large bowl; toss well.

Combine vinegar, oil, salt and black pepper in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk. Drizzle vinegar mixture over pasta mixture; toss well to coat. Sprinkle with cheese.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 274, Calories from Fat: 71, Fat: 8 g, Trans Fat: 0 g (1 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 96 mg, Sodium: 215 mg, Potassium: 488 mg, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Fiber: 2 g, Sugar: 2 g, Protein: 38 g.

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Posted in: Dine In, Produce


Family Matters: Walk the Talk


Treadmill

As a parent with children, we at times tell our kids how to act or what to do, and we later find ourselves not doing the same. Over the years, I have talked to my kids about overeating or eating healthy but not followed suit. Well, as I have gotten older, I have gained weight, and with my family history of heart problems and high blood pressure, that is not healthy. So, I went out and purchased a treadmill and starting walking every day.

I finally hit my tipping point a few months ago and realized that I needed to get in shape, not only for my own health but for my husband and four daughters. I want to be around to see my children have a family of their own (and some grandkids!). I now get up 30 minutes early every morning and walk one mile before work, and when I get home, I walk another mile. Two miles may not seem like a lot, but for someone who has not exercised in 20 years, it is a big deal. I started watching what I eat, and within two weeks, I can truly feel the difference and my family is proud of me. My goal is to increase my distance of course, but at least I have started in the right direction.

I say all this to tell you that as I have finally made the commitment to change my life for the better, I came home last week to find one of my children running on the treadmill. I was surprised and even more surprised to find out that the other three had been doing the same but none of them had mentioned it to me. Now, we take turns as a family working out on the treadmill. Not only am I now getting my money’s worth out of the machine, but my entire family is in the process of living a healthier life.

Remember: “walk the talk” in all that you do. This is so very important in our Christian lives especially. Let us all reflect Him daily in our actions and words, that His name may be glorified. Count your blessings daily and give thanks for the time you have with your family.

 



Shop the Sale: Slow Cooker Smoked Chicken


Slow Cooker Smoked ChickenOnce upon a time, I had no idea what to do with a whole fryer chicken. I didn’t really want to fry it. I didn’t know how to butcher it, and I certainly had no concept of what it meant to butterfly it.
Then, someone told me to just plop it in the slow cooker and cook it that way.

Brilliant.

The slow cooker is one of my favorite ways to make dinner and a whole fryer chicken comes out so well after a long, slow simmer in the slow cooker. Smoked paprika almost imparts a cooked-on-the-grill flavor, but you could really use any spice or spice combination that you like. There’s no need to add any liquid to this recipe to end up with a juicy bird. Try this while whole fryers are on sale at Brookshire’s and buy a few extra to freeze. Just be sure to thaw chicken entirely before cooking this recipe.

Slow Cooker Smoked Chicken

Ingredients:
4-5 lb whole fryer chicken
4 Tbs smoked paprika
2 cups white onions, chopped

Directions:
Rinse chicken and place in slow cooker, breast side up. Sprinkle with smoked paprika and top with chopped onions. Cook on low heat setting for 8 hours.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 471, Calories from Fat: 245, Fat: 27 g (7 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 227 mg, Sodium: 590 mg, Potassium: 164 mg, Carbohydrates: 6 g, Fiber: 3 g, Sugar: 2 g, Protein: 52 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

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Posted in: Shop the Sale


Mi Blog Hispano: Deliciosa Receta de Coctel Mariscos


Coctel MariscosEstuve recientemente en una celebración en la casa de unos amigos quienes prepararon un delicioso Coctel de Mariscos llamado por ellos “Vuelve a la Vida”, así que me encantó y les pedí la receta y hace unos días me aventuré a prepararlo y déjenme decirles que me quedó para chuparse los dedos, así que hoy voy a compartir con ustedes esta gran receta que aprendí.

Coctel Mariscos

Ingredientes:
1 litro de agua
1 cucharada de aceite de oliva
300 g. de camarones crudos
300 g. de pulpa de jaiba
300 g. de ostiones
300 g. de pulpo, cocido y en cubos pequeños
½ taza de salsa de tomate cátchup
3 cucharadas de vinagre blanco
1 chile manzano picado muy finito
1 chile guajillo
1 cucharadita de aceite
1 aguacate
Sal y pimienta al gusto

Preparación:
Calienta el agua con aceite de oliva y una pizca de sal. Agrega los camarones y deja que se cocinen por 10 minutos Luego coloque en la misma agua la pulpa de la jaiba y hierva durante cuatro minutos más, cuélelos y guarde una taza del caldo. Quite la piel de los camarones y mezcle con la pulpa de la jaiba, los ostiones y el pulpo picado en trozos si es muy grande. Agréguele la salsa de tomate, el vinagre blanco y el chile manzano, junto al chile guajillo cortado en rodajas y freído en aceite previamente. Revuelva todos los ingredientes y sirva frio en copas grandes que puedes decorar con trocitos de aguacate y acompañar con galletas saladas o tostadas.

En nuestras tiendas puedes encontrar todos estos ingredientes con una excelente calidad y frescura y además a precios muy convenientes. ¡Que lo disfruten!

Para 4 personas.



Healthy Living: Peppers Stuffed with Quinoa, Corn and Feta


Peppers Stuffed with Quinoa, Corn and FetaWith the bounty of available summer produce, I could really go meatless all during the hot months.

Quinoa, a complex grain, provides protein and corn provides a carbohydrate in this dish, giving you a balanced meal. The feta cheese adds tang to this dish, and the jalapeño peppers make it spicy and give great flavor to the grains.

Peppers Stuffed with Quinoa, Corn and Feta 

Ingredients:
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup quinoa
2 Tbs olive oil
1 bunch scallions, including 2 inches of the greens, thinly sliced
2 jalapeño peppers, finely diced
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
1 tsp ground cumin
4 ears worth of corn kernels (about 2 cups)
1 bunch spinach, leaves only
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1/4 lb feta cheese, cut into small cubes
2 large red onions, thinly sliced into rounds
1/2 cup veggie broth or white wine
4 bell peppers

Directions:
Bring 2 cups of water to a boil. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt, then the quinoa. Give it a stir, then cover. Simmer over low heat until the grains are tender and reveal their spiraled germ, about 15 minutes.
Warm half the oil in a wide skillet. Add the scallions and jalapeño peppers. Cook over medium heat for about 2 minutes, then add the garlic, cumin, corn and spinach, along with 2 tablespoons water. When the spinach is wilted, add the cilantro, quinoa and feta; remove from heat. Toss everything together. Taste for salt and season with pepper.

Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a wide skillet. When hot, add the onions and sauté, stirring frequently, until they start to color around the edges after several minutes. Pour in the broth or wine; deglaze the pan, giving the onions a stir as you do. Season with salt and pepper, and distribute in a baking dish large enough to hold the bell peppers.

Slice the bell peppers in half lengthwise. Cut out the membranes and seeds. Simmer in salted water until tender to the touch of a knife but not overly soft, about 4-5 minutes. Remove. Fill them with quinoa mix and set them in the baking dish.

Preheat oven to 400° F. Bake the peppers until heated through, about 20 to 30 minutes. Switch the heat to broil and brown the tops. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 405, Calories from Fat: 149, Fat: 17 g, Trans Fat: 0 g (6 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 25 mg, Sodium: 374 mg, Potassium: 862 mg, Carbohydrates: 54 g, Fiber: 9 g, Sugar: 10 g, Protein: 14 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Product Talk: Soppressata


SoppressataLast night on our first night of vacation, we sat on the porch of the big yellow house, mesmerized by the ocean waves, the pinks and oranges of the sun setting behind us, and the soaring pelicans flying and dipping into the blue water.

Dinner was cooking, but while we were waiting, we sliced some savory soppressata and served it with a tangy, sharp parmesan.

Soppressata is dried, cured Italian hard salami, and it’s found with the specialty cheeses at Brookshire’s stores. While the varieties of soppressata vary among the different regions of Italy where it’s from, the basic sausage is made of pork, pressed and dried flat. It can also be shaped.

Soppressata is traditionally served on an antipasto platter with cheeses, olives and peppers. Currently, on-trend chefs throughout the United States are substituting it for pepperoni on artisanal pizzas and in red sauce with pasta dishes. 

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Posted in: Product Talk


Dine In: Dominican Rice and Beans


Dominican Rice and BeansAs often happens when my large, extended family convenes, we do what all families do: give each other a hard time.

This week, while we’re all at the beach together, the “hard time” factor is ratcheted up a notch…or two.

We each take turns making a meal for each other during the vacation week. My sister-in-law, Juli, and brother, Andy, grilled shrimp and beef for tacos or fajitas, and Juli made rice and beans.

“These aren’t Mexican,” my brother, Jim, pointed out as we sat down to eat, completely counterintuitive to the Mexican meal Juli and Andy were trying to prepare.

Jim has spent quite a bit of time in Latin America, unlike the rest of us who rely on Pinterest and the Food Network for our exposure to other cuisines.

Luckily, Andy and Juli have a good sense of humor and the “correction” on the name of their dish was forgotten as soon as it was tasted.

This dish of beans, rice and pork cooked in one pot is indeed Dominican in origin. The “peasant food,” so to speak, is filling, easy to cook and great for a crowd.

Dominican Rice and Beans

Ingredients:
8 oz red kidney beans
1/2 lb smoked ham or bacon (coarsely cut into cubes)
4 cloves garlic (coarsely chopped)
1/2 green bell pepper (coarsely chopped)
3 sprigs cilantro (coarsely chopped)
3 medium onions (coarsely chopped)
2 Tbs vegetable oil
1 1/2 Tbs tomato paste
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 medium tomato (coarsely chopped)
2 Tbs vinegar
2 cups white rice (well rinsed)

Directions:
Soak beans overnight or for a minimum of 3 hours in a large container with enough water to generously cover. 

Drain water, transfer beans to a large stockpot and cover with 5 cups of fresh water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, add the ham or bacon pieces, partially cover and cook for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Add 1 cup of water and continue cooking for 30 to 35 minutes.

Meanwhile, make a sofrito. In a food processor or blender, combine garlic, bell pepper, cilantro and half of the onion, and process to a coarse paste.

In a small skillet, heat the oil. Add the sofrito mixture and cook for 1 minute. Add the tomato paste, salt, black pepper, tomato, vinegar and remaining onion to the beans, and cook for 5 minutes. Add the rice and cook uncovered for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.

Reduce the heat to low, cover and cook for another 15 to 20 minutes. Do not stir or the mixture will break up and take on a gluey consistency. The dish is done when the liquid has been absorbed and the rice is fluffy.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 371, Calories from Fat: 59, Fat: 7 g, Trans Fat: 0 g (2 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 16 mg, Sodium: 671 mg, Potassium: 682 mg, Carbohydrates: 62 g, Fiber: 7 g, Sugar: 4 g, Protein: 15 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

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Posted in: Dine In


Family Matters: What’s in your Kid’s Lunch?


Kids Lunch

What do you pack in a kid’s lunch box when they will not eat a sandwich? That’s right; my 12-year-old daughter, Grace, does not eat sandwiches. Not only will she not eat sandwiches but she also does not eat cheese, peanut butter, bread, pasta, nuts and very few. It gets really tough to make her lunch every day for school!

The best way to influence your child’s lunchtime habits, of course, is to pack it yourself. How do you pack a healthier lunch and end up with something they’ll actually eat and not toss in the trash so that they’re ready for an afternoon of learning, playing and growing? Get started here:

Get kids involved in planning: If your children go along when you do the grocery shopping, let them select some or all of their lunch components. (This works best, obviously, if you narrow down their choices first to just a few choices, so you don’t spend all day in the store.) If they don’t accompany you, ask for their requests before you head to the store. Again, this works best if you have a list of good choices to start from.

Get the proper packaging: Since kids don’t have access to microwaves or refrigerators, a small investment in thermal containers and cold packs is worth it. It will allow much more creativity in lunch packing – soups, pastas, cool desserts – and more importantly, it will keep cold and hot foods safe and appetizing to eat.

Pack ahead: Mornings are a rush job in most households. If you only have two minutes to throw lunch together, it’s far too easy to rely on leftover pizza and a bag of chips. Instead, pack the night before right after dinner and before you’ve cleaned up the kitchen. Make it a family project; older kids can make their own lunches while you load the dishwasher, or younger ones can help pull out lunch components with your supervision.

Make simple substitutions and phase them in gradually: You don’t have to make drastic changes, at least not right away. A few small substitutions will get you on the way to healthier lunches fast. For instance, substitute yogurt-covered raisins, trail mix or plain dried fruit for candy. Use mustard or fat-free mayo instead of full-fat mayonnaise or sandwich spread. Send pretzels or carrots with ranch dressing instead of chips and lean turkey instead of fatty pepperoni or bologna on a sandwich.

Experiment a little: We all tend to end up in a lunch rut. Get away from the sandwich-chips-fruit combo. Why not hummus and pita chips, bean dips and baked tortilla chips, or even a container of edamame? Make that sandwich on pita bread, a whole-wheat bagel or a tortilla. Try a Greek yogurt cup instead of pudding.

Allow the occasional surprise treat: Nobody can be perfect all the time, so it’s fun for kids to discover the occasional unexpected treat. A fun-size candy bar, a small bag of chips, a cookie – anything that’s school-approved should be included at least once in a while to mix things up and remind kids that moderation is the goal.

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Posted in: Family Matters


Shop the Sale: Cajun Catfish


Cajun CatfishAs summer winds down, there’s no reason not to capture the feeling of fishing, fun and fireflies with this Cajun-inspired catfish dish. It’s easy to make for a weeknight supper or feed to a crowd at a back-to-school bash.

Catfish comes in several different varieties and is found in all parts of the country, at all depths of bodies of water. Some catfish have a hard exterior: they are for eating. Other breeds of catfish have a mild white meat, which we like to catch, eat and enjoy!

Cajun Catfish

Ingredients:
2 Tbs yellow cornmeal
2 tsp Cajun seasoning or blackening seasoning
1/2 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp dried basil
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp lemon pepper seasoning
2 (6 oz) catfish fillets
1/4 tsp paprika

Directions:
Preheat oven to 400° F. In a large resealable plastic bag, combine cornmeal, Cajun seasoning, thyme, basil, garlic powder and lemon pepper.

Add catfish and shake to coat. Place on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle with paprika. Bake 20-25 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

Nutritional Information: Calories: 265, Fat: 13 g (3 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 80 mg, Sodium: 812 mg, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Fiber: 1 g, Protein: 27 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Healthy Living: Grilled Okra


Grilled OkraOkra is definitely a Southern thing.

While I bristle when people accuse me of being from the North (I’m from the capital of the Confederacy, people!), there were some things, like okra and sweet tea, that took some getting used to here in the Deep, Deep South.

Okra and I have progressed in our relationship. I tasted it. Then, I tolerated it. Then, I liked it. Recently, I had it prepared in such a simple, healthy way that I even have come to crave that dish again.

The beauty of summer, and of veggies like okra, is that you don’t need to do much to them to make a delicious, healthy meal. Let the flavor of the vegetable stand out, and don’t overcook it to preserve the nutrients.

Grilled Okra

Ingredients:
1 lb okra, washed
2 Tbs extra virgin olive oil
2 Tbs Tony Chachere’s seasoning

Directions:
Wash okra. Trim both ends. Toss with olive oil and seasoning.

Prepare grill to medium-high heat. Spray a grill pan with nonstick cooking spray and place okra in the grill pan. Grill, stirring at intervals, until okra is crisp-tender, about 8 minutes.

Serve immediately.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 97, Calories from Fat: 65, Fat: 7 g (1 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 8 mg, Potassium: 339 mg, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Fiber: 4 g, Sugar: 2 g, Protein: 2 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

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On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

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Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

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Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

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