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Dine In: S’mores Oreo Ice Cream Pie


S’mores Oreo Ice Cream PieI was in the mood to make an ice cream pie last weekend. I envisioned a S’mores Ice Cream pie, but when I mentioned it to my son, he said, “Oh, with Oreo ice cream?”

Why not with Oreo ice cream? We made a combination S’mores Oreo pie, and it was delicious.

The great thing about ice cream pies is that you can make any flavor combination you want. This particular pie borrows a technique from a famous ice cream dessert, the Baked Alaska. Make sure the pie is super frozen when you put it under the broiler, or it will quickly turn to ice cream soup.

Ice cream pie on Friday nights reminds me of growing up, when a bowl of our favorite frozen flavor was a weekend treat. Start it a day ahead if need be, so it has enough time in the freezer.

S’mores Oreo Ice Cream Pie

Ingredients:
1 prepared graham cracker crust
1 pint Oreo (or cookies and cream) ice cream
1 (8 oz) jar hot fudge
1 cup mini marshmallows
1 cup marshmallow fluff
1/2 cup Oreo cookies, crushed

Directions:
Let ice cream soften, and stir in 1 cup mini marshmallows. Spread into the bottom of the prepared graham cracker crust; freeze until firm. Remove from freezer, and spread a layer of hot fudge over the ice cream. Put back into the freezer until fudge is firm. Preheat broiler in oven to high. Remove pie from freezer; spread with marshmallow fluff. Place under the broiler for 2 minutes or until marshmallow fluff is lightly golden-brown. Sprinkle with crushed Oreos. Either serve immediately or place back in freezer until ready to serve.

Serves 10

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 354, Calories from Fat: 123, Fat: 15 g (5 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 13 mg, Sodium: 288 mg, Carbohydrates: 56 g, Fiber: 2 g, Sugar: 37 g, Protein: 4 g.

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Posted in: Dine In, Kids


Family Matters: Group Activities


Group ActivitiesYour toddler probably loves group activities.

They’re important for parents, too, as you can make new friends and socialize with someone who speaks in complete sentences and gets you out of the house for a while.

Lots of toddlers like a story time at the local library or bookstore. These are usually free and often involve a story read to the toddlers, with lots of exciting voices and maybe puppets or actors, some songs and games, and maybe a craft project.

You don’t have to take a class to get involved in a music group. You probably have a parent friend with a rudimentary knowledge of music and some spare instruments. Get your toddlers together and let them make some noise, I mean, music.

Tumbling or movement classes provide great sensory input and great fun for your little one. A local gym might have a toddler class, or just go to the playground and swing, run and jump.

Older toddlers might like some kind of art or craft group, with projects fitting for gross and fine motor skills. They can paint large murals, do handprint or footprint crafts, or paint splatter projects. They might also like craft dough and finger paints.

A just play group is great, too. Let the toddlers decide what they’re doing and enjoy watching them interact.



Family Matters: Playtime


PlaytimeI just asked my sons, now 12 and 14 years old, what their favorite toys were when they were about 9 months old.

They each rattled off a list so quickly it made me laugh.

First, they probably don’t have a lot of memories from that time period.

Secondly, I guarantee they were not playing with little Legos at that age.

It was still funny to hear and brought back memories of what were their actual favorite toys in the second half of their first year.

  • Board books, especially the ones with the peek-a-boo windows, were a huge favorite of both my kids. We’d spend hours opening the windows and seeing what was revealed in each story. At 7 months, I was still opening the windows for them. At 12 months, they were trying to do it themselves.
  • Anything that played music. If they could whack it with a chubby hand and make it play music, it was a favorite. We had a plastic toy radio that they could turn on by pressing a button, and it was great to see how they developed to be able to do it themselves.
  • Wooden stacking blocks. Again, at 7 months, they had only rudimentary command of stacking, maybe two at a time, but they could manage a whole lot more by 12 months.
  • Mirrors! Anything reflective is super fun.
  • Baths. Bathtime was often the very best part of the day. The warm water, plus a lot of splashing, was a great combination.
  • Boxes. Empty pots and pans, anything they could just explore completely, with sounds, textures and experiences.
  • The shape sorter! I can’t count the number of hours we played with this. Lots. Lots and lots. It evolved from banging it around to actually sorting the shapes and naming them.

Whatever your baby likes, let him have a lot of playtime. It’s really learning time!



Family Matters: Never Leave Baby in a Car


Never Leave Baby in a CarAs the weather heats up, this blog post is for all parents, not just those with babies.

Do. Not. Leave. Your. Child. In. The. Car.

Each year, approximately 38 children die from overheating because they were left in a car during warm months.

That’s 38 too many.

So far this year, and it’s only April, two children have died from heat-related deaths in cars.

Parents and caregivers, this is 100 percent preventable.

Do not leave your child in the car, period.

It doesn’t matter if you crack the windows; the car will still get too hot. On an 80-degree day, the interior temperature of the car will reach 123 degrees in only one hour.

Heatstroke is defined as when a person’s temperature exceeds 104° F, and their thermoregulatory mechanism is overwhelmed and cannot continue to function properly.

Symptoms of heatstroke include dizziness, disorientation, agitation, confusion, sluggishness, seizures, hot dry skin that is flushed but not sweaty, loss of consciousness, rapid heartbeat and hallucinations.

When the core body temperature reaches 107 degrees, cells are damaged, and internal organs begin to fail and will rapidly lead to death. This happens three to five times faster in children, who cannot regulate their body temperatures as effectively as an adult.

In 54 percent of cases where a child died of heatstroke, their caregiver “forgot” them in the car.

In an additional 24 percent of cases, a child was playing in the car and could not get out.

Teach your children to never, ever play in the car. If they are in the car, you must be in the car with them.

Develop a system of double-checking the car before you leave and lock it. Some adults place their shoe or purse in the backseat, so they have to look in the back before exiting the vehicle.

If you see a child of any age in a hot vehicle, call 911 immediately and take measures to get them out of the car.



Shop the Sale: John Morrell Bacon Egg Salad


John Morrell Bacon Egg SaladWhen I was little, my favorite sandwich was egg salad.

I used to have it in my lunch on Fridays usually (because we didn’t eat meat most Fridays, not just during Lent), and this was back in the days before we packed school lunches in insulated bags with ice packs. Believe it or not, I survived the five-hour-old egg salad sandwich.

I also loved egg salad because it meant I got to help my mom make it and use her nifty harvest-gold colored egg slicer. The little guillotine wires sliced the egg into perfect little rounds, and then I could turn the egg sideways and slice again, cutting it into tiny little pieces.

That’s how I still slice my eggs, although my egg salad has evolved beyond the mayonnaise, salt and pepper.

Now, I add bacon to my egg salad because bacon makes everything better. John Morrell Bacon is on sale this week at Brookshire’s. This crisp, smoky bacon adds a nice hickory flavor to the egg salad, and if you wait to stir it until just before serving, a great pop of texture, too.

Try this for breakfast on a whole-grain bagel thin or in your lunch, refrigeration recommended.

Bacon Egg Salad

Ingredients:
3/4 cup Greek yogurt
1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1/2 tsp dry mustard
1/2 tsp kosher or sea salt
freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
6 strips John Morrell Bacon, cooked and crumbled
1/4 cup red onions, diced
1 Tbs green onions, chopped
8 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

Directions:
Mix together the Greek yogurt, Worcestershire sauce, paprika, mustard, salt and pepper.

Gently stir in the bacon, red onions and green onions. Carefully fold into the eggs until they’re completely coated with the dressing.

Chill well.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 395, Calories from Fat: 248, Fat: 28 g (9 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 376 mg, Sodium: 1418 mg, Carbohydrates: 4 g, Fiber: 0 g, Sugar: 3 g, Protein: 32 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Healthy Living: Living with Celiac Disease


Living with Celiac DiseaseCeliac Disease is an autoimmune and digestive disorder that results in damage to the lining of the small intestine when foods with gluten are consumed. Gluten is a protein found in some grains. Foods containing gluten include anything made with wheat or flour. That’s a lot of the foods in a typical American diet.

The inability to process gluten can lead to the body having a hard time absorbing nutrients like fat, iron, calcium and folate.

Celiac Disease, and other autoimmune disorders, occur when the body’s normal processes turn on itself. Gluten should be absorbed by the body, but in cases of Celiac Disease, the body attacks the gluten and cannot digest it.

Symptoms of Celiac Disease include significant digestive problems, a severe skin rash, musculoskeletal problems like joint disorders, seizures, growth disorders in children and a tingling sensation in the legs caused by low calcium.

Celiac Disease can lead to osteoporosis, miscarriage or infertility, birth defects, seizures and, rarely, cancer of the intestine. Your doctor can diagnose Celiac Disease with a simple blood test, looking for the presence of antibodies.

Removing gluten from your diet usually eliminates the symptoms of Celiac Disease fairly rapidly, but you have to stay on a gluten-free diet the rest of your life. Doctors may recommend infusions of vital nutrients as well.

These days, there are a lot of gluten-free options in Brookshire’s and in restaurants. There are flours and baking mixes made out of potato, rice, corn or soy instead of wheat. Fruits and vegetables are always fine, as are most unprocessed foods. With all the options available on grocery store aisles, you’d almost never know you were eating gluten-free.

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Posted in: Healthy Living


Product Talk: Brookshire’s Pharmacy App


Brookshire’s Pharmacy AppThis might not be something you can buy at Brookshire’s, but it’s definitely something you need from Brookshire’s.

Stop what you’re doing right now (reading this!), reach for your smartphone, and download the Brookshire’s RX Pharmacy app. It’s a game-changer.

Good for use at Brookshire’s, Super 1 Foods and FRESH by Brookshire’s, this app lets you manage your prescriptions from the tap of your screen.

The first time I used it, I had three prescriptions to refill.

I used the barcode scanner on my smartphone to read the label on my prescription, tapped “refill” and moved on to the next prescription! It was that easy.

The automated phone line is great, too, but this shaved minutes off the phone call.

The app also gives you access to Medline Plus health tips, a store locator for your nearest pharmacy, a quick link to the grocery app and, of course, a place to manage all your prescriptions.

By the time you’d have read this, your app should have downloaded and you’re ready to go. Now you can spend that extra time shopping the beautiful produce department or your other favorite aisles at Brookshire’s.

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Posted in: Product Talk


Dine In: Philly Cheesesteak Sliders


Philly Cheesesteak SlidersThis weekend, Paul made us dinner (twice, actually), and with one of the meals, he served King’s Hawaiian Rolls.

The meal itself was magnificent, but what was totally devoured without a leftover in sight? The Hawaiian rolls. Clearly, all three of my guys love these things.

As for me, I love to make dishes they love, so I searched for more recipes using the rolls. We’ve already done the ham and cheese baked Hawaiian rolls (and they are well-loved, I assure you), but I was looking for something different.

I came across a recipe for Philly Cheesesteak Sliders, so we gave those a whirl last Friday night. They’re quick and delicious, and (you guessed it) they were gone in a heartbeat.

Next time, I might have to make two pans.

Philly Cheesesteak Sliders

Ingredients:
1 pkg King’s Hawaiian Rolls
1 box Steak-umm thinly sliced steak strips
1 green pepper, sliced in thin strips
1 white onion, sliced in thin strips
6 slices provolone cheese
2-3 Tbs mayonnaise
3 Tbs butter, melted
2 Tbs dried onion
salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350° F.

Melt butter in a small pan; stir in dried onion. Set aside to cool and let onion soften.

Spray a 9 x 13 baking dish with nonstick cooking spray.

Carefully holding the rolls in one sheet, carefully slice through the center, horizontally. Place the bottom of the rolls in 9 x 13 baking dish.

Prepare Steak-umms according to package directions. Remove from skillet. Add onion and pepper; sauté until just tender. They will finish cooking in the oven.

Spread mayonnaise on the bottom of the Hawaiian rolls. Top with beef, onions, peppers and slices of provolone cheese. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Top with the remaining half of the rolls.

Pour butter and onion mixture over the sandwiches. Cover with foil and bake for 10 minutes. Remove foil and bake an additional 10 minutes.

Remove from oven; cut into 12 sliders and serve immediately.

Makes 12

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 400, Calories from Fat: 263, Fat: 29 g, Trans Fat: 0 g (11 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 74 mg, Sodium: 484 mg, Potassium: 56 mg, Carbohydrates: 23 g, Fiber: 1 g, Sugar: 5 g, Protein: 13 g.

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Family Matters: Honey Boy Pink Salmon Croquettes


Honey Boy Pink Salmon CroquettesI am so excited to share this salmon recipe with you because my two boys (my husband and son) are not that crazy about fish. You can imagine their faces when they saw me in the kitchen the other night opening up a can of Honey Boy Pink Salmon to make salmon croquettes! Yeah, they were not happy. They were even talking about eating something else instead, but neither of them can cook.

I was prepared to take all of the leftovers to my parents. I knew they would appreciate tasty salmon croquettes. However, as we sat down to dinner, I watched my husband and son gulp down two croquettes each, and they asked for more! You can bet this will be on my dinner menu again in the near future. As for my parents, there were no leftover croquettes to be had!

The recipe is really easy and can be found right on the Honey Boy Pink Salmon can.

Honey Boy Pink Salmon Croquettes
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 to 20 minutes
Serves: 6

1 can Honey Boy Pink Salmon, drained
2 cups soft breadcrumbs
1/3 cup onions, finely minced
1/4 cup Brookshire’s Milk
2 eggs
2 Tbs parsley, minced
1 to 2 Tbs lemon juice, freshly squeezed
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp dill weed
dash of pepper
cooking oil for browning

Combine all ingredients in mixing bowl and mix well. Heat enough cooking oil to cover the bottom of a non stick pan. Form the salmon mixture into patties, and cook over medium heat until browned on the bottom. Turn them over and brown on the other side.

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Shop the Sale: Bacon Brussels Sprouts Skewers


Bacon Brussels Sprouts SkewersI posted on social media recently that I’m obsessed with Brussels sprouts. I was surprised at the number of people who “liked” my post and commented in agreement. I guess I thought that because we didn’t eat Brussels sprouts growing up that no one else did, either.

This is also a testament to the power of the parent who does most of the cooking. My mom didn’t like Brussels sprouts, so we didn’t eat them. I eat anything, so my boys pretty much get exposed to all kinds of food. More often than not, it’s one of them who doesn’t like something that is served. One in particular, I should say.

Back to Brussels sprouts… I eat them roasted with a drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper. I want my boys to like them as well, so I found a simple recipe with everyone’s favorite ingredient: bacon.

Brookshire’s Bacon always cooks up crisply, with a bold, meaty flavor and beautiful, caramel color. It has a deep, rich flavor that showcases the meat, not the fat, and is versatile in any recipe.

After we tried this, I’m not sure one son was bowled over by Brussels sprouts, but he did eat the bacon.

Brookshire’s Bacon is on sale this week, and Brussels sprouts are at the peak of flavor. So, this quick, simple recipe should go on your menu list, for sure.

Bacon Brussels Sprouts Skewers

Ingredients:
1 lb fresh Brussels sprouts
1/2 lb Brookshire’s Bacon
2 Tbs extra virgin olive oil
1 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
wooden skewers

Directions:
Soak your wooden skewers in a shallow pan of water for at least 30 minutes before preparing this dish.

Trim ends off of fresh Brussels sprouts and remove loose leaves. Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper in a large bowl.

Separate bacon into strips. Thread one end of the bacon onto a skewer, and then place a Brussels sprout on the skewer. Wrap the bacon over one side of the sprout; thread through the skewer. The bacon will make an “S” pattern around the sprouts. Repeat until the skewer is full. Repeat with remaining sprouts and bacon.

Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Place skewers on the grill for about 5 to 7 minutes. Flip and grill another 5 to 7 minutes. If the bacon is causing flare-ups, move to indirect heat and grill until browned and toasty and bacon is cooked through.

These can also be roasted in a 400° F oven for 15 minutes, flipping halfway through the cooking time.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 417, Calories from Fat: 280, Fat: 31 g, Trans Fat: 0 g (9 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 62 mg, Sodium: 1920 mg, Potassium: 786 mg, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Fiber: 5 g, Sugar: 3 g, Protein: 25 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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