share. The Brookshire's Blog

Dine In: Meatloaf Bombs


Meatloaf BombsThis post is an homage to an account I follow on Instagram. The owner of the account, whose real name I don’t know of course, is a grill aficionado, with new, delicious-looking temptations on his account almost daily. The man must live on his back porch (which sounds like heaven-on-earth to me).

He posted a picture recently that made me stop and do a double-take. It looked amazing. It made me actually consider commenting and asking him what his secret was. After I thought about it, I knew I had to do more than consider the question. I commented and he answered! He didn’t give away all his secrets, so I had to guess at the recipe when I recreated it on a recent Friday night, but he did tell me enough to cook it perfectly. We’ll be making this again and again.

Meatloaf Bombs

Ingredients:
1 lb ground beef
1/2 cup panko or seasoned breadcrumbs
1 egg
2 Tbs Worcestershire sauce
2 Tbs parsley, dried
1 tsp garlic salt
2 Tbs ketchup or tomato paste
2 large white onions
8 slices bacon

Directions:
Mix ground beef with breadcrumbs, egg, Worcestershire sauce, parsley, ketchup and garlic salt. Form into 4 balls.

Peel white onion and remove ends. Using the tip of a sharp knife, slice through the outer ring of onion and remove. Remove the 2 outer layers of onion (the 2 largest ones) from each onion. Wrap onion around each ball of meat, forming kind of a shell. Wrap 2 slices bacon around meat balls, crisscrossing over the top and securing with a toothpick to hold the mixture together.

Preheat grill to 400° F.

Place meatloaf bombs on the grill over indirect heat. Cook until internal temperature reaches 160° F for medium, 170° F for well-done. Serve immediately.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 634, Calories from Fat: 294, Fat: 33 g, Trans Fat: 0 g (11 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 205 mg, Sodium: 1669 mg, Potassium: 975 mg, Carbohydrates: 21 g, Fiber: 2 g, Sugar: 8 g, Protein: 60 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

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Posted in: Cooking, Dine In


Family Matters: Patient Potty Training


Potty TrainingFirst things first: Your toddler might not be ready for potty-training when they are 3 years old and that’s perfectly fine.

One of my sons, who has a September birthday, potty-trained the summer before he turned 3. The other son wasn’t potty-trained until WELL AFTER he turned 3, and that was fine, too.

I can promise you one thing: no matter how old they are, if they are not ready, it’s going to result in a lot of frustration for all of you!

So to get started, wait until your toddler shows signs of being interested in the potty. Is he telling you when he’s wet or dirtied his diaper? That’s another good sign of potty-readiness. If he’s asking questions or wants to see what happens when you use the restroom, that’s another good indicator.

Find a potty he likes. Some tots don’t mind using a seat adaptor on the big potty. My kids wouldn’t hear of it. A smaller potty chair worked best for them. Decorate it. Does your daughter want a pink princess potty? Make it happen! Stickers, paint, whatever it takes to make little one feel comfortable on the potty. Stock the bathroom with books and toys; you might be there a while some days.

Pick out new BIG KID underpants with your child. My younger son only had to be told once not to tee-tee on Thomas (the train), and he didn’t wet those pants again!

Decide your approach. Are you going to transition to underpants slowly using pull-up diapers, or are you going to go cold-turkey?

Set aside time. You might need to stay home for a week straight to properly teach your child how to use the potty.

Figure out their currency. That’s what Dr. Phil says, at least. Find out what motivates them to want to use the potty effectively and offer that incentive.

Bring them to the potty regularly. Bring them FAR more often than they’ll need to go, so they will start to learn how it feels when they have to go and don’t miss the opportunity.

Don’t get discouraged; they will have accidents.

Finally, if the first round doesn’t take, put the potty away for a while and try again in a few weeks.



Family Matters: Keeping Up With Baby


Keeping Up With BabyThose months from 7 to 12 are explosive!

Baby gets moving!

During the age from 7 to 12, baby is likely to start scooting, crawling, cruising and even walking. It’s hard to keep up!

During this time frame, it’s especially important to make sure your house is baby-proofed! Your little one is going to tug on, pull on, hold onto, bump into and grab at anything she can get her hands on as she explores her environment from new vantage points.

Did you think the boxes you had stored under the bed were safely tucked away? Think again! They’re right about baby’s eye level as she crawls.

What about the cabinets with the cleaning supplies? Baby is going to use that handle to pull up and inadvertently open the cabinet. Lamps and decorative objects on tables? Goners. Cords and plugs? So much fun to touch.

It might sound silly, but crawl around your house at baby’s level and see what she sees that might be tempting to little hands.

Install childproof locks on any cabinets containing things you don’t want baby to touch.

Move décor and unsteady objects to higher ground for a few years so they don’t topple on baby. Consider installing safety straps on the back of any furniture, like bookshelves, that baby could pull down on top of her.

Good luck keeping up!



Family Matters: Preventing Diaper Rash


Preventing Diaper RashGrandmas always say that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and never has the saying been truer than when it comes to diaper rash!

Diaper rash is an irritation on a baby’s bottom, usually because of irritation from a wet or dirty diaper.

Baby’s bum is a particularly sensitive area, especially on some babies. My older son had buns of steel; he probably had one or two diaper rashes that I can remember. My younger son had diaper rashes so constantly that I would apply diaper rash cream every single time I changed his diaper.

In fact, that’s not a bad strategy for a baby prone to diaper rashes because when it comes down to it, they are easier to prevent than they are to treat.

The first defense against diaper rash is to change the baby’s diaper frequently. The drier baby stays, the more his skin is protected. At first, I felt like I was changing my son’s diaper too frequently; it wasn’t even wet when I’d go to give him a clean one, but it went a long way in keeping his diaper rashes under control.

The second tactic is to keep a barrier between baby’s skin and the diaper. A diaper rash cream or a layer of simple petroleum jelly applied thickly to baby’s bum works wonders. Our moms used baby powder, which helps absorb moisture. Now, we know that it’s not good for baby’s lungs to inhale powder, but if you keep it neatly contained and controlled in your hand when you apply it, that could also help.

Next, be proactive if your child is on antibiotics. They can change the PH of your baby’s stools or urine, making them more susceptible to irritation. The same goes for new foods. You never know how a baby will react to a new food, and the irritation might manifest in their diaper!

As always, make sure that when you change their diaper, they are very clean and completely dry when you put a new one on. It’s also not a bad idea to let them “air out” a bit after a bath so their bottom can dry completely.



Mi Blog Hispano: El Cuidado de las Flores del Día de los Enamorados


El Cuidado de las Flores del Día de los Enamorados¡Ya llega el 14 de febrero!  Este día es más conocido como el Día de San Valentín o el Día de los Enamorados.  Es un día especial porque queremos consentir a nuestra pareja con regalos, chocolates, ositos de peluche, flores, o una exquisita cena.  Aunque los queremos todo el año, este día queremos que se sientan aún más queridos.

Uno de los regalos más comunes, y que más se vende para este día son las flores.  Según una encuesta de la Federación Nacional de Menoristas, en el 2015, el 37.8% de personas en la nación compro flores el Día de los Enamorados gastando $2.1 billones.  Esto quiere decir que hay mucha posibilidad que usted sea una de esas personas que recibirá flores en este día especial.  ¡Que romántico!

¡Las flores son tan hermosas!  Llenan el ambiente con tanta alegría, frescura, y quisiéramos que nos duren siempre.  Es tan importante cuidarlas bien porque aparte de hermosas, son especiales y hacen que nuestro hogar luzca mejor.

Hay algunas cosas que puede hacer para disfrutar sus flores y hacer que le duren más.

  1. Mantenga sus flores alejadas de áreas calientes (como calentadores, la tele, o la estufa).
  1. Si las flores están envueltas en papel y con ligas, es importante sacarlas del papel y ponerlas en un envase floral y con agua.
  1. ¿Sabía que las flores toman mucha agua? Llene el envase de agua fresca a diario, y asegure que cada flor este tocando agua.
  1. Hay ocasiones en que las flores vienen con un paquetito de preservativos. Úselo para sus flores.  Si no tiene, entonces puede agregarle un poquito de azúcar al agua.  Este es un remedio de mi mama que dice que ayuda a las flores, y yo le creo.
  1. Corte el vástago de la flor cada que le cambie el agua. Corte solamente una pulgada cada vez.  Esto ayuda a que la flor absorbe mejor el agua y dure más.  Cuando empiecen a quedar más chicas las flores, haga otros arreglos con las mismas flores.  Simplemente use más envases chicos, y separe sus flores.

¿Le gustaría guardar una pequeña memoria de sus flores?  Si es así, tome una sola flor y métala entre las páginas de un libro grueso y pesado.  Después de varias semanas la flor queda plana y bella.  Es una manera de tener una bonita memoria de ese arreglo tan especial.

Tomando unos pocos minutos extras para cuidar nuestras flores hace que las disfrutemos un poco más.  Es tan bonito decorar nuestros hogares con plantas y flores naturales así que saber cómo cuidarlas vale la pena.

¡Les deseo que se la pasen de maravilla junto a su pareja especial en este Día de los Enamorados!



Shop the Sale: Bubble Chicken


Bubble ChickenSometimes, like on a cold winter’s night, you want something creamy, cheesy and simple to make that will “stick to your ribs,” as my mom used to say.

Check, check, check, check.

This chicken dish fits the bill. I like anything with cheese and sour cream; my kids love anything with chicken, and we all love anything with bacon. Plus, there are those nights when you need a one-dish meal that cooks up quickly (like every Tuesday and Thursday night before soccer practice).

This week, boneless, skinless chicken breasts are on sale at Brookshire’s, so you can buy a package or two and cook up some chicken to use in this dish! Then, on the night you choose, it will be ready to mix up and pop into the oven.

This is called “Bubble Chicken” because the biscuits puff up, and the creamy mixture bubbles when the dish is ready.

Bubble Chicken

Ingredients:
2 cups cooked chicken, chopped
1 (10.75 oz) can cream of chicken soup
8 oz sour cream
1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
1 1/2 Tbs ranch dressing mix
1/4 cup chopped bacon, cooked
1 (12 oz) can refrigerated Pillsbury Grands Jr. Biscuits

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350° F.

Spray a 9 x 13 pan with nonstick cooking spray.

Thoroughly mix chicken, cream of chicken soup, sour cream, cheese, ranch dressing mix and bacon together.

Cut each biscuit into 4 pieces. Toss with the chicken mixture. Pour into prepared pan.

Bake for about 25 minutes, or until the dish is bubbly and the pieces of biscuit are golden-brown. Serve immediately.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 814, Calories from Fat: 436, Fat: 48 g, Trans Fat: 0 g (23 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 146 mg, Sodium: 2110 mg, Potassium: 438 mg, Carbohydrates: 46 g, Fiber: 1 g, Sugar: 7 g, Protein: 46 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

 



Healthy Living: Salads in a Jar


Salads in a JarMy sister-in-law, Lesley, takes healthy to a whole new level. Her eating is as clean as it gets, and she puts a massive amount of time and effort into taking good care of her family’s health. She has my brother and her three sons eating super-duper healthy as well, which shows! They are an active, lean, happy family, and she takes great care of them inside and out!

Recently, Lesley hosted a salad-making party. Each guest brought one ingredient for a salad, along with five large Mason jars, and Lesley provided the leafy greens.

They set up everything they brought in salad-bar style. Guests started by placing any salad dressing they wanted (including vinegar and oil) in the bottom of their Mason jar. When you’re making these, keep dressings and wet ingredients on the bottom.

Next, add heavy ingredients like black beans, kidney beans or chick peas, or any proteins like chunks of chicken, tuna packed in water or grilled lean meats. On top of that, layer other fruits and veggies like strawberries, yellow peppers, cucumbers or tomatoes. Then, nuts, sunflower seeds or other grains are added. Finally, pack the jar with leafy greens like romaine or spinach. Cap the jar tightly, and store in the fridge for up to one week. Grab a jar each morning on the way out the door.

Turn it out onto a large paper plate, and your salad lunch is ready to go with the dressing already on top.

Enjoy!



Product Talk: TGI Fridays Green Bean Fries


TGI Fridays Green Bean FriesThe other night, Paul was making dinner and I pulled out some romaine lettuce, some cucumbers and some Roma tomatoes to make a salad.

“WHAT ARE YOU DOING?” he asked, with a slightly horrified expression on his face.

“Um…making a salad,” I stuttered.

“WHY. ARE. YOU. DOING. THAT?” he wanted to know.

“Because we don’t have a fresh vegetable with dinner,” was my response.

This is a conversation we frequently have during meal-planning at my house.

I ask, “What vegetable do you want?” and the response is always, “Salad.”

Don’t get me wrong, I love a good salad, and when I make them, I can get so creative with what I put into it.

However, my guys, all three of them, are a little less creative.

Oh, they can be creative when they try to argue that rice is a vegetable. I mean, it’s a member of the vegetable kingdom because it grows in the ground, but it is classified as a grain.

When I think “vegetable,” I think green or at least brightly-colored and healthy.

I told this to Paul, who listened, because he brought over green beans the next time he was making dinner.

Fried green beans.

They were delicious and brightly-colored.

TGI Fridays has a whole line of frozen appetizers and snacks that mimic the appetizers on their restaurant menus. Green beans fries are just that: fried green beans. Even when you reheat them, they are crispy and come with a zesty wasabi ranch dipping sauce.

I laughed so hard when he produced green beans, and I couldn’t argue that they didn’t count as my version of a vegetable.

They were delicious and fun to eat! You can find them in the freezer section of Brookshire’s in the “snacks” case.

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Dine In: Homemade Bread Bowls


Homemade Bread Bowls I remember when serving soup in a bread bowl was all the rage, and I’ll never forget the first time I had it served that way.

I was in graduate school at the University of Texas at Austin, and a class I was taking in public relations only had four students registered for the course. We only met once a week for three hours on a Friday morning. The professor elected to have class in a small bistro near campus in downtown Austin. We’d arrive and order breakfast with a never-ending pot of coffee, from which we got more than our money’s worth, and we’d pour over the lesson and engage in lively discussion and banter. It was one of my favorite classes, mostly for the ambiance and the readily-available caffeinated beverages.

Then, there was the soup in the bread bowl. I usually ordered breakfast, but remember, it was a three-hour class. If I’d eaten breakfast before my two-hour commute to class, I was hungry again about an hour into class. It was that odd time when either breakfast or lunch would work, and soup tastes good at pretty much any time of day or night.

This café served a velvety tomato soup in a whole-grain bread bowl that was sustenance enough for two meals, especially on those rainy, chilly days of the winter semester. I could savor the soup, then pick at the saturated morsels of whole-grain bread until there was nary a crumb left on my plate.

I made bread bowls recently for a soup we were going to have on a cold, Friday night, and my kids thought this was the most brilliant, novel idea they’d ever heard of.

Using instant yeast made this a practical meal for a Friday night after a long week of work.

Homemade Bread Bowls

Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups warm water
2 Tbs instant yeast
1 Tbs sugar
3 1/2 cups bread flour, more as needed
2 tsp salt
spray bottle with warm water

Directions:
In the bowl of a heavy-duty stand mixer, dissolve the yeast and sugar in the 1 1/2 cups of warm water. Make sure the water isn’t too hot or it will kill the yeast. Let it stand for 5 to 10 minutes, or until it becomes foamy.

Add 3 cups of flour and the salt, and mix at medium speed of the mixer until well-combined.

Mix in the remaining flour, 1/4 cup at a time, until the dough is smooth, only slightly sticky to the touch and begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. Knead until smooth. Place the dough in a bowl greased lightly with olive oil or sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Cover with a damp towel and let rise 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes, punch the dough down and divide into 4 equal-sized pieces.

Preheat the oven to 500° F. Shape each piece into a ball, and place on a lightly-greased baking sheet.

Score the top of each roll, then spray with warm water and sprinkle with salt. Let rest for 15 minutes.

Bake for 2 minutes, spray again with water, then reduce the heat to 425° F. This will give you the crisp crust on the bread.

Bake for 16 to 18 minutes or until golden-brown. Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Using a paring knife, score a circle on the top of the bread. Remove ring of outer crust and soft, tender interior, leaving a thick shell. Reserve the removed bread for other purposes. Spoon soup into the bread bowl; serve immediately.

Serves 4

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 427, Calories from Fat: 12, Fat: 2 g, Trans Fat: 0 g, (0 g Saturated Fat), Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 1171 mg, Potassium: 238 mg, Carbohydrates: 89 g, Fiber: 4 g, Sugar: 3 g, Protein: 13 g.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

 

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Posted in: Cooking, Dine In, Kids


Family Matters: Easy Meal Idea


Easy Meal IdeaI recently prepared a meal for my family that was so easy to make, and it was delicious not only for dinner but it also made a great leftover meal for the next day.

Slow Cooker Pork Loin
Cut pork loin in 3/4” to 1” pieces, and dip in a milk and egg mixture to moisten the outside of the meat. Place pieces of pork loin in breadcrumbs (flip several times to make sure they are covered). Place the breaded pork loin in a slow cooker and seal off with cover. I put 3 layers of pork chops with no problem. Do not put any type of water or juice in the slow cooker. Cook on high for 4 hours. Remove from slow cooker, and you are ready to eat. Meat comes out crunchy and tender. If your family likes gravy, it would be great on top of the finished pork loin.

Baked Diced Potatoes
Wash whole potatoes thoroughly in warm water. Cut potatoes in half and then cut into small cube-shaped pieces (as large or small as you like). Place in a large bowl, rinse with cold water and then drain. Add olive oil in the bowl and mix potatoes until they are covered. Add at least 1 package of dry ranch dressing, and toss potatoes so the seasoning is mixed in well. Bake at 400° F for 1 hour or until tender. Remove from oven and enjoy. Potatoes are soft, full of flavor and better for you since they are baked!

Try this easy meal idea and use the extra “free time” to enjoy your family or to do something special for yourself…you deserve it! Count your blessings daily and give thanks for time with your family.



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

Product Talk

Each Monday we feature a new or interesting product.

Healthy Living

Tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, every Tuesday.

Shop the Sale

On Wednesdays, get a tip or idea on using an item in the circular.

Family Matters

Ideas for the whole family come to you every Thursday.

Dine In

Stop fighting the crowds, save money and dine in, every Friday.

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