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Shop the Sale: Sausage Queso Fundido


It’s the time of year when work parties, holiday gatherings, outings with friends, potlucks and other festivities abound.

I seem to be stuck in the rut of always bringing the same few dishes to these events, so this year I tried to shake up my tried-and-true routine while still giving people their favorites.

This sausage queso fundido fit the bill perfectly. Who doesn’t love a bowl of warm cheese and some chips? This recipe is just a slight variation of an old favorite. The flavor is heightened with a dash of beer or tequila, but you can omit that if you don’t want to use it (don’t forget the alcohol will burn off).

Traditionally a fundido is made and served in a cast iron skillet, but you can always keep it warm in your slow cooker too.

Jimmy Dean Pork Sausage is on sale at Brookshire’s this week and I’d be willing to bet you have a party coming up sometime in the next week or two!

Sausage Queso Fundido
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
1/2 lb Jimmy Dean Pork Sausage
1 small onion, diced
1 jalapeno, seeded and diced
1 tomato, seeded and diced
1 clove garlic, chopped
1/4 cup tequila or Mexican beer (optional)
1/2 lb Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
2 Tbs cilantro, chopped

Directions:
Cook the sausage in a pan over medium heat, breaking it apart as you go, about 5-7 minutes. Drain. Add the onion, jalapeno and tomato and cook until the onions are tender, about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about a minute. Add the tequila, deglaze the pan and cook until most of the moisture is gone, about 2 minutes. Sprinkle on the cheese and cook, stirring, until it melts, about 2-3 minutes.

Nutritional Information: Calories: 449, Calories from Fat: 300, Total Fat: 33 g, Cholesterol: 98 mg, Sodium: 730 mg, Total Carbohydrates: 3 g, Dietary Fiber: 1 g, Sugars: 1 g, Protein: 25 g

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Healthy Living: Holiday Party Pitfalls


I have been to three holiday parties so far and that has amounted to at least six extra pounds. It’s hard to stay away from the mini-meatballs, the petit-fours, the sausage slices and the cheese balls and crackers.

But there are choices you can make at all these holiday fetes that won’t adversely affect your waistline.

• Bypass the chips and other fried pound-packers and help yourself to a small handful of nuts, reduced-fat cheese and fresh fruit, or chilled shrimp. Or serve a hummus dip with a holiday-themed veggie platter: red or green pepper, zucchini and jicama strips.
• Instead of a slice of pecan pie, opt for a small slice of pie minus the crust, and make it pumpkin, which is lower in fat and calories and also provides a good dose of beta-carotene. Or try a couple of strawberries dipped in chocolate.
• Instead of calorie-laden eggnog, choose hot apple cider spiced with cinnamon.
• Cheese straws are delicious, but how about a pretzel dipped in salsa instead?
• Dodge the mashed potato bar! Grab a baked sweet potato chip in its place.
• Cheesecake is decadent. If you must, bake a bite-sized version in a mini-muffin pan (and only eat one).
• Spinach and artichokes are packed with nutrition, then drowned in cream and cheese for a warm, crowd pleasing dip. Try drizzling roasted artichokes with a little extra virgin olive oil and sprinkling with salt and pepper.
• Traditional gingerbread is a holiday treat – try making cookies instead, which come in with fewer calories and grams of fat.
• Tis the season for rich coffee drinks. Add one crushed peppermint candy to your coffee instead of choosing a peppermint mocha.
• And when all else fails, don’t forget your regular exercise.

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Posted in: Healthy Living


Product Talk: Passion for Pomegranates


Pomegranates are considered one of nature’s “super foods,” thanks to the cancer- and disease-fighting properties of their juicy seeds. And this time of year, pomegranates make a powerful, delicious addition to your wintertime diet – whether you drink the juice or enjoy a snack of pomegranate seeds (which are completely edible).

A ripe pomegranate feels fairly heavy when you pick it up. You want to choose one that is not pale in color; Look for dark or bright red firm skin. And be sure to eat it as soon as you open the pomegranate. It’s easy for this super fruit to dry out, which won’t taste the way it’s meant to be enjoyed.

One of my favorite pomegranate recipes pairs the taste (and nutrition) of the fruit with toasted walnuts in a wonderful winter salad. It’s colorful and beautiful on your plate, not to mention great tasting and great for you!

Enjoy!

Winter Salad with Walnuts and Pomegranates

For the vinaigrette

Ingredients:
2 tsp shallots, chopped
2 Tbs balsamic vinegar
1 Tbs Dijon mustard
1 tsp thyme, chopped
3/4 cup olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

For the salad
Ingredients:
2 lbs mixed salad greens
2 Granny Smith apples, peeled and julienned
1/4 lb blue cheese
Seeds of 1 pomegranate
3/4 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

Directions:
To prepare the vinaigrette, place the shallot, vinegar, mustard and thyme in a small bowl. Slowly whisk in the olive oil, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Place salad greens, apples and blue cheese in a large bowl and toss with the vinaigrette. Add half the pomegranate seeds and walnuts, then toss again. Sprinkle the remaining seeds and walnuts over the salad. Serves 6.

Nutritional Information: Calories: 529, Fat: 40 g, Sodium: 347 mg, Carbohydrates: 35 g, Protein: 0 g, Fiber: 0 g, Cholesterol: 0 g

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Dine-In: Hot and Sour Soup


Hot and Sour SoupI have become obsessed lately with a local Chinese restaurant’s hot and sour soup.

When I say obsessed, I mean I ate it five days in a row last week. It’s that good.  It’s thick, it’s spicy, it’s perfect for a cold winter night. And it would be even better if I didn’t have to change out of my pajamas to get some.

This recipe is the closest I’ve found to my restaurant favorite and I can prepare it in my pajamas and not have to leave my fireplace on a Friday night to make a soup run!

Hot and Sour Soup
Makes 2 quarts

Ingredients:
4 dried Chinese fungi (about 1 oz), such as wood ears or cloud ears
2 Tbs canola oil
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated
1 Tbs red chile paste
1/2 cup canned bamboo shoots, sliced
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup rice vinegar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp ground white pepper
Pinch sugar
2 quarts Chinese Chicken Stock, recipe follows
1 square firm tofu, drained and sliced in 1/4-inch strips
3 Tbs cornstarch mixed with 1/4 cup water
1 large egg, lightly beaten
Chopped green onions and cilantro leaves, for garnish

Directions:
Put the wood ears in a small bowl and cover with boiling water. Let stand for 30 minutes to reconstitute. Drain and rinse the wood ears; discard any hard clusters in the centers.

Heat the oil in a wok or large pot over medium-high flame. Add the ginger, chili paste, wood ears, bamboo shoots; cook and stir for 1 minute to infuse the flavor. Combine the soy sauce, vinegar, salt, pepper and sugar in a small bowl. Pour it into the wok and toss everything together – it should smell really fragrant. Pour in the Chinese Chicken Stock, bring the soup to a boil, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the tofu and cook for 3 minutes.

Dissolve the cornstarch in the water and stir until smooth. Mix the slurry into the soup and continue to simmer until the soup thickens. Remove the soup from the heat and stir in 1 direction to get a current going, then stop stirring. Slowly pour in the beaten eggs in a steady stream and watch it spin around and feather in the broth (it should be cooked almost immediately.) Garnish the hot and sour soup with chopped green onions and cilantro before serving.

Chinese Chicken Stock

Ingredients:
1 (4 lb) whole chicken
1 bunch green onions, halved
4 garlic cloves, smashed
3-inch piece fresh ginger, whacked open with the flat side of a knife
1 onion, halved
1 tsp whole white peppercorns
3 quarts cold water

Directions:
Put the chicken in a large stockpot and place over medium heat. Toss in the green onions, garlic, ginger, onion and peppercorns. Pour about 3 quarts of cold water into the pot to cover the chicken by 1-inch. Simmer gently for 1 hour, uncovered, skimming off the foam on the surface periodically.

Carefully remove the chicken from the pot and pass the stock through a strainer lined with cheesecloth to remove the solids and excess fat. Cool the chicken stock to room temperature before storing in the refrigerator, or chill it down over ice first.

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

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Posted in: Dine In


Product Talk: Hominy


Pork and Hominy ChiliI never had hominy until I made a cooking mistake. In a hurry at the grocery store one night, I grabbed hominy off the shelf instead of the ingredient I needed for a soup. When I got home and realized my mistake, it was too late to run back to the store and get the correct ingredient.

I opened the can of  hominy, drained it, fished out a piece and popped it in my mouth.“This will do,” I thought, and emptied the can into my soup. It was a hit.

Hominy is essentially kernels of corn which are soaked in an alkali solution of either lime or lye.

The corrosive nature of the solution removes the hull and germ of the corn and causes the grain itself to puff up to about twice its normal size. It’s safe to eat, don’t worry!

Hominy can be made with either white or yellow corn, specifically maize, which is the type of corn used in making cornmeal and other grain products. Hominy can be ground into grits or used in soups, stews, casseroles, baking and breakfast dishes.

I love the taste and texture. Softer than corn, but chewier than a potato or pasta, hominy adds a texture to soups and stews that I find very appealing.

Hominy generally comes in a can. This is even better because this is the last week to participate in the Brookshire’s 2012 Spirit of Christmas Food Drive. Customers can help by donating non-perishable food items in the designated bin or by purchasing a scan coupon at checkstands in our stores. All contributions will go to the food drive. Brookshire’s partners with service organizations and volunteers to provide a box of food for local households screened by local agencies. In addition, our company matches each box with a free baking hen.

So when you’re in Brookshire’s this week, grab a can of hominy for you, and one for the food drive.

Pork and Hominy Chili
Serves 4

Ingredients:
2 tsp canola oil
8 oz boneless center-cut pork chops, trimmed and cubed
1 cup chopped onion (about 1 medium)
3/4 cup chopped green bell pepper
2 tsp bottled minced garlic
1 Tbs chili powder
2 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/8 tsp ground red pepper
1/4 cup no-salt-added tomato paste
1 (15.5 oz) can golden hominy, rinsed and drained
1 (14.5 oz) can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
1 (14 oz) can fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup light sour cream

Directions:
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add pork to pan; sauté 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Add onion, bell pepper, and garlic to pan; sauté 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in chili powder and next 4 ingredients (through red pepper). Cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in tomato paste, hominy, tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes. Serve with sour cream.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 238, Fat: 8 g, Protein: 18 g, Carbohydrate: 25 g, Fiber: 5 g, Cholesterol: 33 mg, Iron: 2 mg, Sodium: 650 mg, Calcium: 61 mg

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



Family Matters: Baby Wearing


When I had my first son, I knew everything about parenting.

Cough.

Choke.

Snort.

Sputter.

OK, I didn’t. I didn’t know a thing.

Phew. There, I admitted it.

But when I had my second son, 17 months later, I knew all there was to know about parenting.

**crickets**

Busted.

I’m not going to pretend I knew everything then, either, but I did do things a bit differently with son number 2 than I had with son number 1.

One of the biggest things I did differently was embrace babywearing.

What’s that, you ask?

Babywearing simply means holding or carrying a baby or young child using a cloth baby carrier.

My friends wanted to buy me a ticket to Woodstock and make sure I had some recycled sandals.

It’s not like that at all, people!

And truth be told, it was as much as having my hands free for my 17-month old as it was having my newborn up close next to my body. We called my sling, the cloth wrap I wore Luke in, the “papoose.” Luke was often not happy at all if he wasn’t in the blue denim sling I wore him in for hours and hours every day.

(Before you argue with me, he’s 9 and has no attachment issues, thank you very much)

Experts say some of the benefits of baby wearing include:

• Happy Babies. It’s true carried babies cry less! In a study published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers found that babywearing for three hours a day reduced infant crying by 43 percent overall and 54 percent during evening hours.

• Healthy Babies. Premature babies and babies with special needs often enter the world with fragile nervous systems. When a baby rides in a sling attached to his mother, he is in tune with the rhythm of her breathing, the sound of her heartbeat, and the movements his mother makes—walking, bending, and reaching. This stimulation helps him to regulate his own physical responses. Research has even shown that premature babies who are touched and held gain weight faster and are healthier than babies who are not.

• Confident Parents. A large part of feeling confident as a parent is the ability to read our babies’ cues successfully. Holding our babies close in a sling allows us to become finely attuned to their movements, gestures, and facial expressions. Every time a baby is able to let us know that she is hungry, bored, or wet without having to cry, her trust in us is increased, her learning is enhanced, and our own confidence is reinforced. This cycle of positive interaction deepens the mutual attachment between parent and child, and is especially beneficial for mothers who are at risk for or suffering from postpartum depression.

• Loving Caregivers. Baby carriers are a great bonding tool for fathers, grandparents, adoptive parents, babysitters, and other caregivers. Imagine a new father going for a walk with his baby in a sling. The baby is becoming used to his voice, heartbeat, movements, and facial expressions, and the two are forging a strong attachment of their own. Baby carriers are beneficial for every adult in a baby’s life. Cuddling up close in the sling is a wonderful way to get to know the baby in your life, and for the baby to get to know you.

•Comfort and Convenience. With the help of a good carrier, you can take care of older children or do chores without frequent interruptions from an anxious or distressed infant—which helps reduce sibling rivalry. Baby carriers are also wonderful to use with older babies and toddlers; you can save those arms and go where strollers can’t. Climbing stairs, hiking, and navigating crowded airports all can be done with ease when you use a well-designed baby carrier.

But of course, never put safety second.

Some tips:

Make sure your baby can breathe. Baby carriers allow parents to be hands-free to do other things, but you must always remain active in caring for your child. No baby carrier can ensure that your baby always has an open airway; that’s your job.

1. Never allow a baby to be carried, held, or placed in such a way that his chin is curled against his chest. This rule applies to babies being held in arms, in baby carriers, in infant car seats, or in any other kind of seat or situation. This position can restrict the baby’s ability to breathe. Newborns lack the muscle control to open their airways. They need good back support in carriers so that they don’t slump into the chin-to-chest position.

2. Never allow a baby’s head and face to be covered with fabric. Covering a baby’s head and face can cause her to “rebreathe” the same air, which is a dangerous situation. Also, covering her head and face keeps you from being able to check on her. Always make sure your baby has plenty of airflow. Check on her frequently.

3. Never jog, run, jump on a trampoline, or do any other activity that subjects your baby to similar shaking or bouncing motion. “This motion can do damage to the baby’s neck, spine and/or brain,” explains the American Chiropractic Association.

4. Never use a baby carrier when riding in a car. Soft baby carriers provide none of the protection that car seats provide.

5. Use only carriers that are appropriate for your baby’s age and weight. For example, frame backpacks can be useful for hiking with older babies and toddlers but aren’t appropriate for babies who can’t sit unassisted for extended periods. Front packs usually have a weight range of eight to 20 pounds; smaller babies may slip out of the carrier, and larger babies will almost certainly cause back discomfort for the person using the carrier.

Baby wearing was such a great experience for us that I highly recommend you try it. Bottom line, you have to do what works for you.



Shop the Sale: Roast Pork Loin With Garlic and Rosemary


I can remember the precise moment I fell in love with rosemary.

It was in Germany, in the fall of 1994, just after I moved to the country for what would be a three-and-a-half year adventure.  My birthday fell three weeks after I moved overseas, far away from family and friends. I didn’t speak the language and, truth be told, I felt pretty alone at first.

All government employees – and soldiers – were required to take a two-week German language immersion course upon arrival in Germany. Our teacher was Greta, and she looked like she just dropped out of an ad for the German National Tourism Board. She was robust and no-nonsense, but very kind, patient and funny.

When she discovered it was my birthday, the second to last day of the class, she invited us all to bring treats for lunch and she would provide the main course.

When she walked into that classroom that morning, bearing a large platter covered with a soft towel, I was hooked.

The smell of rosemary wafted from under the towel and permeated the classroom throughout the morning’s lesson. Mine wasn’t the only stomach growling in eager anticipation of the mid-day meal.

When our clumsy lessons finally wrapped up for the day and we reconvened at the work table – transformed into the lunch table – and Greta uncovered that platter, I knew I was in love.

She’d prepared a roast pork loin with rosemary and garlic. Although I’d had rosemary in other dishes, Greta had used entire fresh sprigs of what is now my favorite herb and skewered them into the pork like wands. The effect was stronger than what it would have been if she’d just chopped the leaves and the woodsy flavor carried through the entire roast.

Pork tenderloin is on sale this week at Brookshire’s, and I know one girl who will be recreating this magical dish in her own (American) kitchen.

Roast Pork Loin with Garlic and Rosemary
Serves 8

Ingredients:
4 large garlic cloves, pressed
4 tsp chopped fresh rosemary or 2 tsp dried
1 1/2 tsp coarse salt
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1 (2 1/2 lb) boneless pork loin roast, well-trimmed
Fresh rosemary sprigs (optional)

Directions:
Preheat oven to 400° F. Line 13×9-inch roasting pan with foil. Mix first 4 ingredients in bowl. Rub garlic mixture all over pork. Place pork, fat side down, in prepared roasting pan. Roast pork 30 minutes. Turn roast fat side up. Roast until thermometer inserted into center of pork registers 155° F, about 25 minutes longer. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes. 

Pour any juices from roasting pan into small saucepan; set over low heat to keep warm. Cut pork crosswise into 1/3-inch thick slices. Arrange pork slices on platter. Pour pan juices over. Garnish with rosemary sprigs, if desired.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 200, Total Fat: 7 g, Cholesterol: 100 mg, Protein: 27 g, Sodium: 246 mg, Fiber: 0 g



Dine-In: Do You Have an Elf on the Shelf?


Austrian ShortbreadDo you have an Elf on the shelf?

We do.

Ok, not the “official,” trademarked Elf on the Shelf, but his cousin, Saxon.

Saxon comes to visit sometime soon after Thanksgiving and stays for the holiday season. He gets into a lot of mischief.

Last year, he took the flour out of the baking cupboard and tried to make a cake, but he only succeeded in spreading flour all over my black, granite countertops.

Not only that, but Saxon tried to bring a feeling of the North Pole to our Southern home by making snowflakes one night. Guess who had to clean up all the little paper clippings in the hallway?

Saxon was known to log on to our family laptop and change the screen saver message. One night he wrote, “Cookies for breakfast!” Guess what we had for breakfast the next morning?

I remember one morning when I woke up and staggered to the boys’ rooms to get them out of bed. Saxon had hung twinkle lights all over their bedrooms!

Silly elf!

Since Saxon usually finds his way to our house right after Thanksgiving, but just before we decorate the Christmas tree, usually the first weekend in December, there’s usually a little anticipatory celebration (although we never know for sure when Saxon will show up, he’s a very silly elf).

Of course, it never hurts to leave a little treat to entice a silly elf to come to your house.

This is my favorite shortbread recipe. Freezing the dough and grating it makes it melt in your mouth and lighter than air.

Austrian Shortbread
Makes 24 bars

Ingredients:
1 lb (4 sticks) unsalted butter, slightly softened
4 egg yolks
2 cups granulated sugar
4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
Optional additions: 1 tsp vanilla extract or 1 tsp lemon zest
1 cup raspberry jam, at room temperature
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar

Directions:
Cream the butter in a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or using a hand mixer) until soft and fluffy. Add the egg yolks and mix well.

Mix the granulated sugar, flour, baking powder and salt together. Add to the butter and egg yolk mixture and mix just until incorporated and the dough starts to come together. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and form into 2 balls. Wrap each ball in plastic wrap and freeze at least 2 hours or overnight (or as long as a month, if you like).

Heat the oven to 350° F.

Remove 1 ball of dough from the freezer and coarsely grate it by hand or with the grating disk in a food processor into the bottom of a 9×13-inch baking pan or a 10-inch tart pan with a removable bottom. Make sure the surface is covered evenly with shreds of dough.

With a piping bag with a wide tip or a zip-lock bag with the corner cut off, squeeze the jam over the surface as evenly as possible, to within 1/2 inch of the edge all the way around. Remove the remaining dough from the freezer and coarsely grate it over the entire surface.

Bake until lightly golden brown and the center no longer wiggles, 50 to 60 minutes. As soon as the shortbread comes out of the oven, dust with confectioners’ sugar.

Cool on a wire rack, then cut in the pan with a serrated knife. I find that chilling the pan in the fridge makes it a lot easier to get clean crust.

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 285 Calories from Fat: 147 Total Fat: 16 g Saturated Fat: 10 g Cholesterol: 76 mg Sodium: 134 mg Total Carbohydrates: 33 g Dietary Fiber: 1 g Sugars: 17 g Protein: 3 g

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.

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Posted in: Cooking, Dine In


Shop the Sale: Eckrich Smoked Sausage Casserole


I don’t know about you, but I loved every minute of the Thanksgiving holiday.

I also know that I’m done with turkey and leftovers, at least until Christmas rolls around.

So when planning my menus this week, I was looking for something that didn’t involve, well, turkey.

I was glad to see Brookshire’s has Eckrich smoked sausage on sale. I love sausage of any kind and when you combine sausage with pasta and cheese, I’m in heaven. This is a great dinner on a cool fall night.

Cheesy Smoked Sausage Casserole
Serves 6

Ingredients:
2 cups uncooked penne pasta
1 lb smoked sausage, cut into 1/4-inch slices
1 1/2 cups 2% milk
1 (10.75 oz) can condensed cream of celery soup, undiluted
1 1/2 cups cheddar french-fried onions, divided
1 (4 oz) cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese, divided
1 cup frozen peas

Directions:
Cook pasta according to package directions. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat for 5 minutes; drain. In a large bowl, combine milk and soup. Stir in 1/2 cup onions, 1/2 cup cheese, peas and sausage. Drain pasta; stir into sausage mixture.

Transfer to a greased 13 x 9 baking dish. Cover and bake at 375° F for 25-30 minutes or until bubbly. Sprinkle with remaining onions and cheese. Bake, uncovered, 3-5 minutes longer or until cheese is melted.

Nutritional Information: Calories: 525, Calories from Fat: 264,Total Fat: 29 g, Cholesterol: 117 mg, Sodium: 1072 mg, Total Carbohydrates: 36 g, Dietary Fiber: 2 g, Sugars: 4 g,Protein: 28 g



Product Talk: Brookshire’s Bacon


Jalapeño Popper Chicken I’ve tried a lot of bacon in my day (Who hasn’t? Just admit it!) and hands down, Brookshire’s brand original sliced,  hickory smoked is my favorite.

It crisps nicely when cooked, either in the microwave or on the stovetop, it’s not too salty, it’s full of hickory flavor and it doesn’t tend to burn.

I could probably write 97,351 blog posts using bacon, but this is one I made last week and my family has already asked for it again.

It combines the flavor of a jalapeño popper with chicken and, of course, bacon. The traditional jalapeño “popper” is a deep-fried, breaded jalapeño stuffed with cream cheese. This take on it makes a mouthwatering meal that would be great for a family dinner or  a special occasion.

Jalapeño Popper Chicken
Serves 4

Ingredients:
4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, pounded to about 1/3-inch
4 oz cream cheese
4 oz cheddar cheese
2 jalapeño peppers, diced
1 Tbs hot sauce
12 strips Brookshire’s Original Sliced, Hickory Smoked Bacon
Toothpicks

Directions:
Pound chicken breasts until they are about 1/3-inch thick.  Soften cream cheese. Add cheddar, jalapeño and hot sauce. Mix well.

Place about 2 tablespoons of cream cheese mixture on one end of chicken. Roll chicken around filling. Wrap chicken with three slices of bacon, secure with a toothpick.

Bake at 400° F for 25 to 30 minutes (I had to finish mine under the broiler to “crisp” the bacon).

Nutritional Information: Calories Per Serving: 614, Calories from Fat: 366 g, Total Fat: 41 g,Saturated Fat: 20 g, Cholesterol: 213 mg, Sodium: 1069 mg, Total Carbohydrates: 2 g, Sugars: 1 g, Protein: 58 g

View this recipe to print or add items to My Shopping List.



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The products mentioned in “Share, the Brookshire’s Blog” are sold by Brookshire Grocery Company, DBA Brookshire’s . Some products may be mentioned as part of a relationship between its manufacturer and Brookshire’s.

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